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Current Invasive species News and Events

Current Invasive species News and Events, Invasive species News Articles.
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The wildlife trade encompasses all major branches of the biological tree of life
The wildlife trade is a multibillion-dollar industry that threatens biodiversity. (2020-05-26)
Can e-learning help stem the threat of invasive alien species such as Japanese Knotweed?
E-learning could be a crucial tool in the biosecurity fight against invasive alien species such as Japanese Knotweed, Zebra Mussels and Signal Crayfish according to a new study published in the academic journal 'Biological Invasions'. (2020-05-26)
A new Critically Endangered frog named after 'the man from the floodplain full of frogs'
A new species of a Critically Endangered miniaturised stump-toed frog of the genus Stumpffia found in Madagascar is named Stumpffia froschaueri after ''the man from the floodplain full of frogs'', Christoph Froschauer. (2020-05-25)
Marine species are outpacing terrestrial species in the race against global warming
Global warming is causing species to search for more temperate environments in which to migrate to, but it is marine species -- according to the latest results of a Franco-American study mainly involving scientists from the CNRS, Ifremer, the Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier and the University of Picardy Jules Verne -- that are leading the way by moving up to six times faster towards the poles than their terrestrial congeners. (2020-05-25)
Scientists take first census of Arctic freshwater molluscs in 130 years
Based on previously released data and their own investigations, researchers at the St Petersburg University Laboratory of Macroecology and Biogeography of Invertebrates have assessed the diversity of freshwater molluscs in the Circumpolar region of the World. (2020-05-25)
New native grass species have been discovered on the Iberian Peninsula and Menorca
The new species belong to the genus Aira, delicate herbaceous plants, which enjoy their greatest diversity in the Mediterranean Region. (2020-05-22)
Marine biology: Spiny lobster noises may be heard up to 3 km away
Noises produced by European spiny lobsters -- known as antennal rasps -- may be detectable up to 3 km underwater, according to a study in Scientific Reports. (2020-05-21)
CRISPR a tool for conservation, not just gene editing
The gene-editing technology CRISPR has been used for a variety of agricultural and public health purposes -- from growing disease-resistant crops to, more recently, a diagnostic test for the virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-05-21)
Divergence in flowering time contributes reproductive isolation between wild rice species
This study chose a pair of wild rice species (Oryza rufipogon and O. nivara) as a unique system to investigate the between-species reproductive isolation based on artificial crossing experiment and the flowering census from the common garden experiment. (2020-05-20)
Hunting threatens one of the world's most amazing wildlife migrations
As the world looks to tighten up the illegal capture of wildlife, migratory birds are being threatened by widespread and unsustainable hunting across the Asia-Pacific region. (2020-05-20)
A sound treatment
University of Utah biomedical engineering assistant professor Jan Kubanek has discovered that sound waves of high frequency (ultrasound) can be emitted into a patient's brain to alter his or her state. (2020-05-20)
How the mouse conquered the house
A study, published in Scientific Reports on May 19, 2020, reconstructs the history of the biological invasion of the house mouse and reveals that the diffusion dates into Europe coincide with the first appearance of domestic cats on the continent. (2020-05-19)
Faster breeding sea urchins: A comeback animal model for developmental biology
University of Tsukuba researchers identified a species of sea urchin with a relatively short breeding cycle of six months. (2020-05-19)
How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
New research from Kyoto University show that the coal tit (Periparus ater) can eavesdrop and react to the predatory warning calls of the Japanese tit (Parus minor) and evokes a visual image of the predator in their mind (2020-05-19)
How does an increase in nitrogen application affect grasslands?
The 'PaNDiv' experiment, established by researchers of the University of Bern on a 3000 m2 field site, is the largest biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment in Switzerland and aims to better understand how increases in nitrogen affect grasslands. (2020-05-19)
Ecosystem diversity drives the origin of new shark and ray species
Biologists how different oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of California and the Baja California Peninsula influenced formation of new species of sharks and rays. (2020-05-19)
Analysis of bird species reveals how wings adapted to their environment and behavior
Bird wings adapted for long-distance flight are linked to their environment and behavior, according to new research on an extensive database of wing measurements, led by the University of Bristol. (2020-05-18)
Fish feces reveals which species eat crown-of-thorns
Crown-of-thorns starfish are on the menu for many more fish species than previously suspected, an investigation using fish poo and gut goo reveals. (2020-05-18)
Even biodiverse coral reefs still vulnerable to climate change and invasive species
A new study reveals clear evidence highlighting the importance of fish biodiversity to the health of spectacular tropical coral reef ecosystems. (2020-05-18)
New study records dual hand use in early human relative
Research by anthropologists at the University of Kent has identified hand use behavior in fossil human relatives that is consistent with modern humans. (2020-05-18)
Study examines impact of Chicago River reversal on region's aquatic environments, fauna
In a paper published in the journal Urban Ecosystems, University of Illinois at Chicago students from the departments of earth and environmental sciences and biological sciences have measured both the extent of wetland loss in Cook County since the time of the river reversal and the alterations in the animal populations. (2020-05-18)
Food webs determine the fate of mercury pollution in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon
In the Grand Canyon reach of the Colorado River, two species play an outsized role in the fate of mercury in the aquatic ecosystem, and their numbers are altered by flood events. (2020-05-15)
SCAI issues position statement on the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention in ambulatory surgical centers
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) today issued a position statement on the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs). (2020-05-14)
SCAI issues expert consensus on managing patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has released an expert consensus statement describing recommendations for the management of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). (2020-05-14)
Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health. (2020-05-14)
Cell therapy treatment for cardiac patients with microvascular dysfunction provides enhanced quality
Trial results presented today revealed a promising therapy for patients experiencing angina due to coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD). (2020-05-14)
Patients with intermediate left main disease experience worse cardiovascular events
A new study shows that when compared with patients without intermediate left main coronary artery disease, those with intermediate left main disease have greater risk of cardiovascular events. (2020-05-14)
The butterfly effect: Climate change could cause decline of some alpine butterfly species
The long-term effects of climate change suggests that the butterfly effect is at work on butterflies in the alpine regions of North America, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists -- and the predictions don't bode well. (2020-05-12)
Alaskan rainforests are a global lichen hotspot, new study shows
The rainforest fjords of Southeastern Alaska harbor one of the highest concentrations of lichen diversity found anywhere on Earth, according to a new study spearheaded by University of Alberta scientists. (2020-05-12)
New test identifies lobster hybrids
Scientists have developed a test that can identify hybrids resulting from crossbreeding between European and American lobsters. (2020-05-11)
Medicinal plants thrive in biodiversity hotspots
Scientists from Leipzig have shown a way to considerably simplify this search for bioactive natural compounds using data analyses on the phylogenetic relationships, spatial distribution and secondary metabolites of plants. (2020-05-11)
Seahorse and pipefish study by CCNY opens window to marine genetic diversity May 08, 2020
The direction of ocean currents can determine the direction of gene flow in rafting species, but this depends on species traits that allow for rafting propensity. (2020-05-08)
New freeze-resistant trichinella species discovered in wolverines
A new freeze-resistant Trichinella species has been discovered in wolverines by Agricultural Research Service scientists and their colleagues. (2020-05-06)
Biocontrol most cost-effective in fight against common pest pear Opuntia stricta
Dactylopius opuntiae 'stricta' biotype is more effective as a sustainable biocontrol against invasive common pest pear Opuntia stricta in Laikipia County, Kenya, compared to physical and/or chemical control. (2020-05-05)
Yellow-legged gull adapts its annual lifecycle to human activities to get food
The yellow-legged gull has a high ability to adapt to human activities and benefit from these as a food resource during all year. (2020-05-05)
Predators help prey adapt to an uncertain future
What effect does extinction of species have on the evolution of surviving species? (2020-05-04)
Smart use of genomic data needed in species conservation
A 'step-change' in conservation is needed in order to help save species from extinction in the future, according to an academic at the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2020-05-04)
How gene flow between species influences the evolution of Darwin's finches
Despite the traditional view that species do not exchange genes by hybridisation, recent studies show that gene flow between closely related species is more common than previously thought. (2020-05-04)
New guidelines for treating the sickest COVID-19 patients
A new set of recommendations for health care workers on the front lines, to help them make decisions on how to treat the most critical COVID-19 patients, those with severe lung or heart failure, has been published. (2020-05-04)
Study finds natural fires help native bees, improve food security
Native bees that boost food crops are in decline but changing fire management policies could help them. (2020-05-01)
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