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Current Invasive species News and Events

Current Invasive species News and Events, Invasive species News Articles.
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Standard pathology tests outperform molecular subtyping in bladder cancer
While trying to develop a comparatively easy, inexpensive way to give physicians and their patients with bladder cancer a better idea of likely outcome and best treatment options, scientists found that sophisticated new subtyping techniques designed to do this provide no better information than long-standing pathology tests. (2019-12-13)
The wild relatives of major vegetables, needed for climate resilience, are in danger
The genes that make crop wild relatives robust have the potential to make their cultivated cousins -- our food plants -- better prepared for a harsh climate future. (2019-12-13)
Experiment suggests the best ways to tackle invasive Oregon grape in Belgian coastal dunes
Despite being a protected high conservation value habitat, the Atlantic coastal dunes are severely impacted by invasive species. (2019-12-12)
Biology: Genetic 'clock' predicts lifespan in vertebrates
A model that uses genetic markers to accurately estimate the lifespans of different vertebrate species is presented in a study in Scientific Reports this week. (2019-12-12)
Northern Ireland's recovering pine marten population benefits red squirrels
The recovery of pine marten in Ireland and Britain is reversing native red squirrel replacement by invasive grey squirrels, according to new research presented at the British Ecological Society's annual meeting in Belfast today. (2019-12-12)
There's a new squid in town
Researchers in OIST's Molecular Genetics Unit, in collaboration with a researcher from Australia, have identified a new species of bobtail squid inhabiting Okinawa's waters -- dubbed Euprymna brenneri. (2019-12-11)
Real-time photoacoustic thermometry of tumors during HIFU treatment in living subjects
The research team led by Professor Chulhong Kim of POSTECH(Pohang University of Science and Technology) developed a photoacoustic thermometry system combined with a clinical ultrasound imaging platform to effectively guide the high intensity focused ultrasound treatment. (2019-12-11)
Study to help manage shark populations in Pacific Panama
A study in Pacific Panama identifies 11 potential nursery areas of locally common and migratory sharks, which could support shark conservation efforts in the region. (2019-12-11)
Studies show integrated strategies work best for buffelgrass control
Buffelgrass is a drought-tolerant, invasive weed that threatens the biodiversity of native ecosystems in the drylands of the Americas and Australia. (2019-12-11)
Scales offer insight into chronic stress of fish, University of Guelph research finds
Aquatic researchers have long sought an easy way to determine when wild fish are under stress. (2019-12-11)
Tsoi lives in Malaysian forests
Sergey Ermilov, a researcher from Tyumen State University, discovered and described a new species of oribatid mites that lives on the forest floors in Malaysia. (2019-12-11)
Local traditional knowledge can be as accurate as scientific transect monitoring
New research from a cross-organizational consortium in the Amazon has found indigenous knowledge to be as accurate as scientific transect monitoring. (2019-12-11)
Multi-species grassland mixtures increase yield stability, even under drought conditions
In a two-year experiment in Ireland and Switzerland, researchers found a positive relationship between plant diversity and yield stability in intensely managed grassland, even under experimental drought conditions. (2019-12-10)
Rhythmic perception in humans has strong evolutionary roots
So suggests a study that compares the behaviour of rodents and humans with respect to the detection rhythm, published in Journal of Comparative Psychology by Alexandre Celma-Miralles and Juan Manuel Toro, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition. (2019-12-09)
Scientists accidentally discover a new water mold threatening Christmas trees
Scientists in Connecticut were conducting experiments testing various methods to grow healthier Fraser trees when they accidentally discovered a new species of Phytophthora. (2019-12-09)
Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants
Plants that can 'bounce back' after disturbances like ploughing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be 'invasive' if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say. (2019-12-06)
Siberian blue lakes and their inhabitants
There are picturesque but poorly studied blue lakes situated in Western Siberia. (2019-12-05)
Conferring leaf rust resistance in cereal crops
Identifying genes that confer resistance to leaf rust infections could help generate durably resistant cereal crops. (2019-12-05)
Ecology: Wildfire may benefit forest bats
Bats respond to wildfires in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in varied but often positive ways, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. (2019-12-05)
Bats may benefit from wildfire
Bats face many threats -- from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome. (2019-12-05)
Lights on fishing nets save turtles and dolphins
Placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows. (2019-12-05)
How flowers adapt to their pollinators
The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous. (2019-12-05)
UConn researchers draw an evolutionary connection between pregnancy and cancer metastasis
Pregnancy might hold the key to understanding how cancer metastasizes in various mammals -- including humans, according to UConn and Yale researchers. (2019-12-05)
New early Cretaceous mammal fossils bridge a transitional gap in ear's evolution
Fossils of a previously unknown species of Early Cretaceous mammal have caught in the act the final steps by which mammals' multi-boned middle ears evolved, according to a new study. (2019-12-05)
Animals that evolved in low-disturbance areas more 'sensitive' to modern disruption
Animal species that have evolved, and survived, in low-disturbance environments -- with little interruption from glaciation, fires, hurricanes, or anthropogenic clearing -- are more sensitive to modern forest fragmentation, report Matthew Betts and colleagues. (2019-12-05)
Forest fragmentation hits wildlife hardest in the tropics
Animals that evolved in environments subject to large-scale habitat-altering events like fires and storms are better equipped to handle forest fragmentation caused by human development than species in low-disturbance environments. (2019-12-05)
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research. (2019-12-05)
Island 'soundscapes' show potential for evaluating recovery of nesting seabirds
An important tool for monitoring seabird populations involves acoustic sensors deployed at nesting sites to record sounds over long periods of time. (2019-12-05)
Record-size sex chromosome found in two bird species
Researchers in Sweden and the UK have discovered the largest known avian sex chromosome. (2019-12-04)
Untangling the branches in the mammal tree of life
In a new study published in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at Yale University unveil a complete overhaul of the way species data is brought together and analyzed to construct an evolutionary tree of life for mammals. (2019-12-04)
New expert findings seek to protect national parks from invasive animal species
'We value national parks for the natural habitats and wildlife they protect, but because of invasive species, some of our native species are struggling or unable to survive, even with the protection of our park system,' says Virginia Tech wildlife conservation expert Ashley Dayer. (2019-12-03)
Female fish can breed a new species if they aren't choosy about who is Mr. Right
Female fish can breed a new species if they aren't choosy about who is Mr. (2019-12-03)
Global levels of biodiversity could be lower than we think, new study warns
Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought, as assessments fail to account for long-lasting impact of land change, a new study has warned. (2019-12-02)
Model probes possible treatments for neonatal infection, a common cause of infant death
Extremely premature infants are at risk for life-threatening infections called late-onset sepsis, or LOS, that spread into their bodies from the intestine. (2019-12-02)
Smarter strategies
Though small and somewhat nondescript, quagga and zebra mussels pose a huge threat to local rivers, lakes and estuaries. (2019-12-02)
New evolutionary insights into the early development of songbirds
An international team led by Alexander Suh at Uppsala University has sequenced a chromosome in zebra finches called the germline-restricted chromosome (GRC). (2019-11-29)
Australia's got mussels (but it could be a problem)
One of the world's most notorious invasive species has established itself on Australia's coastlines, according to research from The University of Queensland. (2019-11-28)
Concussion recovery not clear cut for children
Sleep problems, fatigue and attention difficulties in the weeks after a child's concussion injury could be a sign of reduced brain function and decreased grey matter. (2019-11-28)
SFU researchers discover eyes a potential window for managing insects without chemicals
The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40% of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published in early 2019. (2019-11-28)
Oyster deaths: American slipper limpet is innocent
Researchers from Kiel University (CAU), in cooperation with the NORe museum association for the North and Baltic Sea region and the Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum in Frankfurt, have managed to shine some light on the decline in numbers of the European oyster. (2019-11-27)
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