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Current Invasive species News and Events

Current Invasive species News and Events, Invasive species News Articles.
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Forests on the radar
With freely available radar data from satellites, biodiversity in forests can be analysed very well. (2019-10-21)
Lifestyle is a threat to gut bacteria: Ötzi proves it
The evolution of dietary and hygienic habits in Western countries is associated with a decrease in the bacteria that help in digestion. (2019-10-18)
Old friends and new enemies: How evolutionary history can predict insect invader impacts
A team led by the University of Washington has developed a model that could help foresters predict which nonnative insect invasions will be most problematic. (2019-10-17)
Pitt study: Sexual selection alone could spark formation of new species
Because of imprinted preferences, strawberry poison frog females mate more with similar colored males, and less with differently colored males. (2019-10-17)
Phylogenetic analysis forces rethink of termite evolution
Despite their important ecological role as decomposers, termites are often overlooked in research. (2019-10-17)
First scientific description of elusive bird illuminates plight of Borneo's forests
Scientists with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and collaborators surveying the birdlife of Borneo have discovered a startling surprise: an undescribed species of bird, which has been named the spectacled flowerpecker. (2019-10-17)
Scientists discover new species of wasp-mimicking praying mantis
Cleveland Museum of Natural History Director of Research and Collections Dr. (2019-10-17)
Industrial melanism linked to same gene in 3 moth species
The rise of dark forms of many species of moth in heavily polluted areas of 19th and 20th century Britain, known as industrial melanism, was a highly visible response to environmental change. (2019-10-17)
Museums put ancient DNA to work for wildlife
Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place. (2019-10-17)
The composition of species is changing in ecosystems across the globe
While the identities of species in local assemblages are undergoing significant changes, their average number is relatively constant. (2019-10-17)
Global biodiversity crisis is a large-scale reorganization, with greatest loss in tropical oceans
Local biodiversity of species -- the scale on which humans feel contributions from biodiversity -- is being rapidly reorganized, according to a new global analysis of biodiversity data from more than 200 studies, together representing all major biomes. (2019-10-17)
In Baltimore, lower income neighborhoods have bigger mosquitoes
Low-income urban neighborhoods not only have more mosquitoes, but they are larger-bodied, indicating that they could be more efficient at transmitting diseases. (2019-10-16)
Research networks can help BRICS countries combat invasive species
BRICS countries need more networks of researchers dedicated to invasion science if they wish to curb the spread of invasive species within and outside of their borders. (2019-10-16)
Newly identified compounds could help give fire ants their sting
Native to South America, imported fire ants have now spread to parts of North America and elsewhere around the world. (2019-10-16)
Study helps pinpoint what makes species vulnerable to environmental change
Researchers from Princeton University affiliated with PEI reported that a bird species' ability to adapt to seasonal temperature changes may be one factor in whether it can better withstand environmental disruption. (2019-10-16)
Digital breast tomosynthesis increases cancer detection over full-field mammography
An ahead-of-print article forthcoming in the March 2020 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) comparing cancer detection rates (CDR) for screening digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) versus full-field digital mammography (FFDM) found that DBT results in 'significantly increased CDR' -- irrespective of tumor type, size, or grade of cancer. (2019-10-16)
Rare 'itinerant breeding' behavior revealed in California bird
Only two bird species have ever been shown to undertake what scientists call 'itinerant breeding': nesting in one area, migrating to another region, and nesting again there within the same year, to take advantage of shifting food resources. (2019-10-15)
Resurrection of 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria jumped from gorillas to humans
For the first time, scientists have uncovered the likely series of events that led to the world's deadliest malaria parasite being able to jump from gorillas to humans. (2019-10-15)
Two new porcelain crab species discovered
Two new symbiotic porcelain crab species have been described. One of them, from the South China Sea of Vietnam, inhabits the compact tube-like shelters built by the polychaete worm with other organisms. (2019-10-15)
Weak immune system linked to serious bacterial infection in children
A new study has found a bacterial infection that can lead to pneumonia or meningitis is linked to weakened immune systems in children. (2019-10-14)
Type 2 diabetes and obesity could be treated by new, less invasive procedure
New research from King's College London published in EBioMedicine, has found that a newly tested medical device, called Sleeveballoon, mimics the effects of traditional bariatric surgery in rodents and produces impressive results on body weight, fatty liver and diabetes control. (2019-10-11)
The impact of human-caused noise pollution on birds
Anthropogenic noise pollution (ANP) is a globally invasive phenomenon impacting natural systems, but most research has occurred at local scales with few species. (2019-10-11)
Removing invasive mice from the Farallon Islands would benefit threatened birds
New research from Point Blue Conservation Science shows the significant negative impact that invasive, non-native house mice on the Farallon Islands are having to the threatened ashy storm-petrel. (2019-10-10)
Mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest revealed
A research group led by Prof. MA Keping from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Institute of Microbiology, have now revealed the underlying mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest. (2019-10-09)
Reef fish caring for their young are taken advantage of by other fish
Among birds, the practice of laying eggs in other birds' nests is surprisingly common. (2019-10-09)
UMD discovers new mechanism in the liver that helps prevent invasive fungal infections
An expert in intravital microscopy, Meiqing Shi, University of Maryland, is making breakthroughs in invasive fungal infections. (2019-10-08)
New large-sized insect species discovered in tropical forest
Scientists at the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland have studied the diversity of tropical parasitoid wasps for years. (2019-10-08)
The deeper these octopuses live, the wartier their skin
Deep beneath the ocean's surface, surprisingly cute pink octopuses creep along the seafloor. (2019-10-08)
Research supports expanding insurance coverage of non-invasive prenatal testing
Research conducted by the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences provides evidence to support expansion of insurance plan coverage of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), a simple maternal blood draw which screens for fetal chromosomal disorders including trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome), and trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), to women under the age of 35. (2019-10-08)
Microbiome provides new clues to determining development of colon cancer
Findings showcasing a connection between bacteria in the microbiome and colon cancer, which may be used to screen younger populations at risk, were published in the journal Gastroenterology by researchers from the George Washington University. (2019-10-04)
Optical imager poised to improve diagnosis and treatment of dry eye disease
Researchers have developed a new non-invasive optical imaging system that promises to improve diagnosis and treatments for dry eye disease. (2019-10-04)
Study finds large potential range for invasive spotted lanternfly
A new study published today in the Journal of Economic Entomology models potential suitable habitat for the invasive spotted lanternfly and shows large swaths of the United States and beyond are likely to be vulnerable should the spotted lanternfly continue to spread. (2019-10-03)
First maps of areas suitable for spotted lanternfly's establishment in US and world
Maps identifying the areas suitable for establishment of the spotted lanternfly (SLF) in the United States and other countries have been published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by Agricultural Research Service scientists. (2019-10-03)
Confronting colony collapse
Researchers from the Ecology and Evolution Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) sequenced the genomes of the two Varroa mite species that parasitize the honey bee. (2019-10-03)
Ant-plant partnerships may play unexpected role in ant evolution
Partnerships between ant and plant species appear to arise from -- but not drive -- rapid diversification of ants into new species. (2019-10-03)
Scientists discover interaction between good and bad fungi that drives forest biodiversity
Researchers from the University of Maryland and the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that the type of beneficial soil fungi living around tree roots determined how quickly the trees accumulated harmful, pathogenic fungi as they grew and could play a key role in determining forest biodiversity. (2019-10-03)
Global wildlife trade is higher than previous estimates show
At least one in five vertebrate species on Earth are bought and sold on the wildlife market, according to a new study, the trade estimates for which are 40-60% higher than prior recorded estimates. (2019-10-03)
Study: Biomarker in urine may offer noninvasive detection of prostate cancer
A research study published in the journal Neoplasia and led by principal investigator Nallasivam Palanisamy, Ph.D., associate scientist in the Vattikuti Urology Institute at Henry Ford Health System, has identified a novel prostate cancer gene fusion involving the KLK4 protein coding gene and KLKP1 pseudogene. (2019-10-02)
New imaging platform examines mechanisms behind coral bleaching
The non-invasive approach developed by Professors Vadim Backman and Luisa Marcelino could help marine biologists monitor coral health in the face of climate change. (2019-10-02)
The hidden ark: How a grassroots initiative can help save fish from extinction
Freshwater fish are the most threatened vertebrate group, and species are disappearing faster than scientists can describe them. (2019-10-01)
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