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Current Invertebrates News and Events

Current Invertebrates News and Events, Invertebrates News Articles.
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Spider baby boom in a warmer Arctic
Climate change leads to longer growing seasons in the Arctic. (2020-06-25)
Scientists take first census of Arctic freshwater molluscs in 130 years
Based on previously released data and their own investigations, researchers at the St Petersburg University Laboratory of Macroecology and Biogeography of Invertebrates have assessed the diversity of freshwater molluscs in the Circumpolar region of the World. (2020-05-25)
Food webs determine the fate of mercury pollution in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon
In the Grand Canyon reach of the Colorado River, two species play an outsized role in the fate of mercury in the aquatic ecosystem, and their numbers are altered by flood events. (2020-05-15)
Prehistoric sea creatures evolved pebble-shaped teeth to crush shellfish
Ichthyosaurs were marine reptiles during the time of the dinosaurs, and scientists don't know much about their ancestry. (2020-05-08)
Ants restore Mediterranean dry grasslands
A team of ecologists and agronomists led by Thierry Dutoit, a CNRS researcher, studied the impact of the Messor barbarus harvester ant on Mediterranean dry grasslands. (2020-04-20)
Invasive species with charisma have it easier
It's the outside that counts: Their charisma has an impact on the introduction and image of alien species and can even hinder their control. (2020-04-06)
Scientists predict the size of plastics animals can eat
A team of scientists at Cardiff University has, for the first time, developed a way of predicting the size of plastics different animals are likely to ingest. (2020-03-27)
Microplastics affect the survival of amphibians and invertebrates in river ecosystems
In collaboration with the National Museum of Natural Sciences (CSIC) in Madrid, the UPV/EHU's Stream Ecology research group has conducted two parallel studies to look at how the larvae of one freshwater amphibian and one invertebrate evolved during 15 days' exposure to microplastics at different concentrations. (2020-03-10)
Fisherwomen contribute tonnes of fish, billions of dollars to global fisheries
Fishing (particularly commercial fishing) is considered a male-dominated realm but it turns out that the 3 million tonnes of fish per year that women catch add up to $5.6 billion or the equivalent of 12% of the landed value of all small-scale fisheries catches globally. (2020-03-04)
New functional indicators to detect human activity impacts in temporary rivers
Functional metrics in ecology -- indicators based on the biological features of the organisms, in this case, water invertebrates -- could help researchers to detect the impacts of human origins in temporary rivers. (2020-02-26)
Seagulls favor food humans have handled
Seagulls favor food that has been handled by humans, new research shows. (2020-02-25)
Diversifying traditional forest management to protect forest arthropods
The structure of vegetation and steam distance are important factors to consider in order to protect the biodiversity of forest arthropods, as stated in an article now published in the journal Forest Ecology and Management. (2020-02-20)
Bumblebees recognize objects through sight and touch, a complex cognitive feat
Demonstrating an unprecedented degree of cognitive complexity in an insect, researchers report that bumblebees are capable of recognizing objects across senses. (2020-02-20)
Freshwater insects recover while spiders decline in UK
Many insects, mosses and lichens in the UK are bucking the trend of biodiversity loss, according to a comprehensive analysis of over 5,000 species led by UCL and the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH), and published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-02-17)
Mass General Hospital researchers identify new 'universal' target for antiviral treatment
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel potential antiviral drug target that could lead to treatments protecting against a host of infectious diseases. (2020-02-11)
Flyception 2.0: New imaging technology tracks complex social behavior
An advanced imaging technology developed at UC San Diego is allowing scientists unprecedented access into brain activities during intricate behaviors. (2020-02-04)
Zoo improvements should benefit all animals
Zoo improvements should benefit all animals and include a wide range of 'enrichment' techniques, researchers say. (2020-01-31)
A strong foundation
Anyone who's read 'The Lorax' will recognize that certain species serve as the foundation of their ecosystems. (2020-01-29)
Carcasses important for plants and insects in the Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve
Allowing the carcasses of dead deer to remain in the Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve has a positive effect on biodiversity in the area. (2020-01-22)
Global study finds predators are most likely to be lost when habitats are converted for human use
A first of its kind, global study on the impacts of human land-use on different groups of animals has found that predators, especially small invertebrates like spiders and ladybirds, are the most likely to be lost when natural habitats are converted to agricultural land or towns and cities. (2020-01-21)
Warmer and acidified oceans can lead to 'hidden' changes in species behavior
Research by scientists at Ghent University (Belgium), University of Plymouth (UK) and University of South Carolina (USA) shows the peppery furrow shell (Scrobicularia plana) makes considerable changes to its feeding habits when faced with warmer and more acidified oceans. (2020-01-20)
Walking sharks discovered in the tropics
Four new species of tropical sharks that use their fins to walk are causing a stir in waters off northern Australia and New Guinea. (2020-01-20)
The mysterious, legendary giant squid's genome is revealed
Important clues about the anatomy and evolution of the mysterious giant squid (Architeuthis dux) are revealed through publication of its full genome sequence by a University of Copenhagen-led team that includes scientist Caroline Albertin of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole. (2020-01-16)
Abandoning pastures reduces the biodiversity of mountain streams
The abandonment of high-altitude mountain pastures and the climatic changes that are causing woodland boundaries to extend ever higher, may potentially result in the reduction of the number and variety of invertebrates living in mountain streams. (2020-01-07)
Organic crop practices affect long-term soil health
Prior organic farming practices and plantings can have lasting outcomes for future soil health, weeds and crop yields, according to new Cornell University research. (2019-12-20)
Floral foam adds to microplastic pollution problem: Study
First study to examine the environmental effects of floral foam finds the plastic material, which breaks into tiny pieces, can be eaten by a range of freshwater and marine animals and affect their health. (2019-12-10)
Siberian blue lakes and their inhabitants
There are picturesque but poorly studied blue lakes situated in Western Siberia. (2019-12-05)
New fossil shrimp species from Colombia helps fill 160 million-year gap
A new fossil species of comma shrimp, exceptionally preserved in mid-Cretaceous rocks of the Colombian Andes, allowed scientists to fill a 160 million-year gap in the evolution of these crustaceans. (2019-11-27)
Climate change is reshaping communities of ocean organisms
Climate change is reshaping communities of fish and other sea life, according to a pioneering study on how ocean warming is affecting the mix of species. (2019-11-25)
Scientists first to develop rapid cell division in marine sponges
Despite efforts over multiple decades, there are still no cell lines for marine invertebrates. (2019-11-21)
Mantis shrimp vs. disco clams: Colorful sea creatures do more than dazzle
Eight years ago, Lindsey Dougherty encountered a colorful creature called a disco clam in an Indonesian reef. (2019-11-18)
Fishery in Lake Shinji, Japan, collapsed 1 year after neonicotinoid use
Neonicotinoid pesticide use may have caused the abrupt collapse of two commercial fisheries on Lake Shinji, Japan, in 1993, according to a new study. (2019-10-31)
Meet the 'mold pigs,' a new group of invertebrates from 30 million years ago
Fossils preserved in Dominican amber reveal a new family, genus and species of microinvertebrate from the mid-Tertiary period, a discovery that shows unique lineages of the tiny creatures were living 30 million years ago. (2019-10-08)
L-chondrite breakup might have contributed to Ordovician biodiversification
About 466 Mya, a major impact event took place between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. (2019-10-03)
Bee biodiversity barometer on Fiji
The biodiversity buzz is alive and well in Fiji, but climate change, noxious weeds and multiple human activities are making possible extinction a counter buzzword. (2019-09-23)
Digital records of preserved plants and animals change how scientists explore the world
There's a whole world behind the scenes at natural history museums that most people never see -- millions upon millions of dinosaur bones, pickled sharks, dried leaves, and every other part of the natural world.These specimens are used in research by scientists trying to understand how different kinds of life evolved and how we can protect them. (2019-09-11)
Filter-feeding pterosaurs were the flamingos of the Late Jurassic
Modern flamingos employ filter feeding and their feces are, as a result, rich in remains of microscopically-small aquatic prey. (2019-08-26)
Improved sewage treatment has increased biodiversity over past 30 years
A higher standard of wastewater treatment in the UK has been linked to substantial improvements in a river's biodiversity over the past 30 years. (2019-08-14)
Staring at seagulls could save your chips
Staring at seagulls makes them less likely to steal your food, new research shows. (2019-08-06)
Toxic chemicals hindering the recovery of Britain's rivers
Toxic chemicals from past decades could be hindering the recovery of Britain's urban rivers, concludes a recent study by scientists from Cardiff University, the University of Exeter, and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. (2019-08-01)
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