Current Investigators News and Events

Current Investigators News and Events, Investigators News Articles.
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Vitamin D lessens symptoms of severe eczema in children
Vitamin D supplementation eased the symptoms experienced by children with severe atopic dermatitis, or eczema, in a recent randomized controlled trial published in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives. (2020-11-04)

Low-dose aspirin linked to reduced liver cancer risk
Among adults at high risk of liver cancer, those who took low-dose aspirin were less likely to develop the disease or to die from liver-related causes. (2020-03-12)

Novel coronavirus receptors show similarities to SARS-CoV, according to new analysis
The recent emergence of Wuhan coronavirus (2019-nCoV) has put the world on high alert for transcontinental transmission, reminiscent of the outbreak of SARS -- also a coronavirus -- in 2002-2003. Previous studies have shown how the SARS virus (SARS-CoV) interacts with animal and human hosts in order to infect them. The mechanics of infection by the Wuhan coronavirus appear to be similar. (2020-01-31)

Training for Title IX investigators lacks tested, effective techniques
Interviews are the central component of any Title IX investigation, but new research finds the techniques investigators are using may not be the most effective. Iowa State University researchers evaluated the available training programs for investigators and identified techniques and suggested practices at odds with science-based interviewing strategies. (2019-10-28)

Mayo Clinic study: 20% of patients are prescribed opioids after cardiac device implantation surgery
One in five patients is prescribed opioids after having a pacemaker or similar device implanted, according to a large US study conducted at Mayo Clinic published in HeartRhythm. Eighty percent of patients who were prescribed opioids had never taken them before. Investigators stress the importance of improving postoperative pain management following cardiac device procedures to reduce use of prescription opioids. (2019-10-21)

Resistance to last resort drug arose in patient over 3 weeks
French investigators have described development of resistance to one of the last resort therapies used to treat extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. That resistance arose in a single patient over a scant 22 days. They subsequently identified the single nucleotide mutation in P. aeruginosa that caused the resistance. (2019-10-21)

Novel combination of drugs may overcome drug-resistant cancer cells
A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital suggests that a combination of three drugs, including a new class of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors, could overcome cross-therapy resistance. The results of the study are published today in Science Signaling. (2019-08-20)

People are more likely to try drugs for the first time during the summer
American teenagers and adults are more likely to try illegal or recreational drugs for the first time in the summer, a new study shows. (2019-07-23)

Prescribed opioids associated with overdose risk for family members without prescriptions
Access to family members' drugs may be a strong risk factor for overdose in individuals without their own prescriptions, according to a new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital. Their findings were published recently in JAMA Internal Medicine. (2019-07-16)

Economic downturns may affect children's mental health
Research linking economic conditions and health often does not consider children's mental health problems. In a new Health Economics study, investigators found that US children's mental health worsened as the economy weakened. The use of special education services for emotional problems also rose when economic conditions worsened. (2019-06-05)

Are otters threatening amphibian populations?
The Eurasian otter typically eats fish, but amphibians, which are in global decline, are also part of its diet, especially when fish are scarce. In a Mammal Review study, researchers identified bones of amphibians in otter faeces from southern Italy to determine which types of amphibians are typically eaten. They also reviewed 64 studies of otter diet. (2019-05-09)

Study of multiple sclerosis patients shows 18 percent misdiagnosed
A recent study found that nearly 18 percent of patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis before being referred to two major Los Angeles medical centers for treatment actually had been misdiagnosed with the autoimmune disease. The investigators found that many patients who came to the medical centers with a previous diagnosis of MS did not fulfill the criteria for that diagnosis, and spent an average of four years being treated for MS before receiving a correct diagnosis. (2019-04-08)

Longitudinal studies provide an excellent research learning environment for trainees
Compared to experimental studies that require complex infrastructures such as laboratories or clinical trials at multiple centers, studies using a longitudinal cohort (an observational research method in which data is gathered for the same participants repeatedly over a period of time) could be a good alternative for investigators as they begin their early research careers. (2019-03-07)

Women scientists get less federal funding than men
First-time women principal investigator scientists received considerably less funding from the National Institutes of Health compared to first-time male principal investigators, even at top research institutions. Women scientists are disadvantaged at the start of their careers. Women also can't buy as much lab equipment or recruit as many grad students for their research.  (2019-03-05)

Breast milk microbiome contains yeast and fungi: Do these benefit the infant?
Investigators have now shown that the breast milk microbiome contains fungi. Multiple previous studies had found bacteria in breast milk. Certain fungi and bacteria have been shown to be important probiotics for infant health. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2019-03-01)

3D printing may help treat osteoarthritis
In a Journal of Orthopaedic Research study, scientists used 3D printing to repair bone in the joints of mini-pigs, an advance that may help to treat osteoarthritis in humans. (2019-01-24)

Investigators discover compounds that block reactivation of latent HIV-1
A team of investigators from the University of Pittsburgh has identified compounds that block the reactivation of latent HIV-1 in a human cell line containing the latent virus. The research is published Dec. 3 in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2018-12-03)

Data does the heavy lifting: Encouraging new public health approaches to promote the health benefits of muscle-strengthening exercise (MSE)
According to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, almost 75 percent of US adults do not comply with public health guidelines recommending two or more muscle-strengthening exercise (MSE) sessions a week, with nearly 60 percent of the population doing no MSE at all. Using the data from a nationally representative sample of US adults, the investigators also linked low-to-moderately frequent MSE with fewer reported health conditions such as diabetes, obesity, and cancer. (2018-10-24)

Junior investigators successfully compete for extra NIH grants
More than half of early-career scientists who received their first research project (R01) grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are successful in obtaining subsequent funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), according to a study published September 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Patricia Haggerty and Matthew Fenton of NIAID, an NIH institute. (2018-09-13)

Caffeine affects food intake at breakfast, but its effect is limited and transient
A new study featured in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics found that after drinking a small amount of caffeine, participants consumed 10 percent less at a breakfast buffet provided by researchers, but this effect did not persist throughout the day and had no impact on participants' perceptions of their appetites. Based on these findings, the investigators have concluded that caffeine is not effective as an appetite suppressant and weight-loss aid. (2018-07-19)

Study results may lead to improved diagnostics for breast cancer
A study in Molecular Oncology indicates that examining the protein and RNA in leftover materials from routine diagnostic tests for breast cancer may lead to more accurate diagnoses. (2018-07-18)

Urinary markers predict bone problems after hip replacement
In a study published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research, investigators have identified urinary markers that differentiate total hip replacement patients who eventually develop bone tissue destruction, or osteolysis, from patients who do not. (2018-06-06)

New cardiac imaging technique shortens testing time, improves patient comfort
Cedars-Sinai investigators have developed a new technique for conducting cardiac magnetic resonance imaging tests that improves patient comfort, shortens testing time and has the potential to increase diagnostic accuracy and reliability. MR Multitasking, is detailed in the April 9 issue of Nature Biomedical Engineering and solves the problem many cardiologists face when using conventional methods to perform MRI scans: how to get a still image when a beating heart and blood flow can blur the picture. (2018-04-09)

Canakinumab reduces risk of cardiovascular events in populations with unmet clinical need
Two new analyses of data from more than 10,000 heart attack survivors worldwide were presented by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital at the 2018 American College of Cardiology meeting. (2018-03-12)

Study finds racial differences in cure rates for Hepatitis C
In a large ethnically diverse group of patients seen at a community-based Veterans Affairs practice, cure rates for chronic hepatitis C were lower for African American individuals relative to White individuals, even when patients were receiving optimal therapies. The findings are published in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives. (2018-02-22)

Ways to make data sharing between the global north and south more fair
Many researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are hesitant to embrace open data policies. In this Policy Forum, David Serwadda et al. highlight the underlying concerns behind this hesitancy, as well as ways to foster more trust and equality surrounding open datasets. (2018-02-08)

Viruses that infect bacteria abound in bladder
Phages -- viruses that infect bacteria -- are abundant in the bacteria that inhabit the female bladder. This is good news, because phage could be used as alternative treatment when antibiotics become resistant to pathogenic bacteria. (2018-01-29)

Study finds minority trainees are up, but not minority faculty
Despite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. Vanderbilt investigators examined the entire training pathway of potential faculty candidates to identify points of greatest loss of URM trainees. They report Jan. 16 in PLOS ONE two key points of loss: during undergraduate education and in transition from postdoctoral fellowship to tenure-track faculty. (2018-01-17)

Workers at smaller companies less likely to be screened for cancer
A new study by American Cancer Society investigators finds workers at organizations with fewer than 25 employees are less likely to have been screened for three cancers, as were people working in certain occupations. (2017-10-12)

Medical device recall rates linked to frequency of FDA inspector rotations says new study
Medical device manufacturing plants in the US can experience 100 fewer product recalls per year, or a decrease of 20 percent, if the FDA investigators who inspect these plants are placed on a rotating schedule, according to a new study in the INFORMS journal Manufacturing & Service Operations Management. (2017-09-28)

A fresh set of eyes: Rotating plant inspectors reduces risk of medical device recalls
More frequent rotation of plant inspectors at medical device manufacturing facilities could benefit consumers and lead to fewer product recalls. That's the finding of a seven-year review of Food and Drug Administration inspections of and subsequent recalls at such facilities. (2017-09-26)

Restoring breathing capacity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by activating the brain
New research published in the Journal of Physiology today suggests that enhancing breathing via the brain may limit deficiencies in respiratory capacity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. (2017-09-26)

Antibiotics and biocidal cleaners may spread multidrug resistance in MRSA
Antibiotic use on people or pets, and use of biocidal cleaning products such as bleach, are associated with multidrug resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the home. This contamination of the home environment may contribute to reinfection of both humans and animals with MRSA, and to subsequent failure of treatment. The research is published Sept. 22 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2017-09-22)

Journalists successfully used secure computing to expose Panama Papers, researchers say
A team of researchers from Clemson University, Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered a security success in an unlikely place: the 'Panama Papers.' (2017-08-17)

Marker may improve lung cancer screening and detection
Investigators have found a new marker that might be used for diagnosing a common form of lung cancer, especially at late stages. (2017-07-07)

3-D printing with living tissues may help treat joint diseases
Degeneration of cartilage and other joint tissues is a major cause of disability. (2017-06-26)

Acetaminophen: A viable alternative for preventing acute mountain sickness
Trekking and mountain climbing are quickly growing in popularity, but.one of the challenges that climbers face is acute mountain sickness (AMS). Previous studies have shown that ibuprofen is an effective way to reduce the risk of AMS. Investigators wanted to find out if acetaminophen, a commonly used anti-pain medicine like ibuprofen, would have a comparable effect. They found almost no difference in the performance of both drugs, suggesting that acetaminophen may be another effective prophylactic treatment for AMS. (2017-06-19)

Does the sex of a cell matter in research?
A Tulane University endocrinologist co-authored a guide in the latest issue of Cell Metabolism to help scientists who study obesity, diabetes or other metabolic diseases better account for inherent sex differences in research.  (2017-06-06)

Engines of twingenuity: NASA's twin study investigators have a meeting of the minds
NASA's Twins Study investigators met in Houston this week to discuss findings from the final data collections. (2017-05-25)

New study opens case on emotional stress of senior police investigators in child homicide
Child homicide can shatter families and communities. But what emotional effect does it have on detectives who might have to investigate such crimes repeatedly during their careers? University of Huddersfield psychologists are carrying out research into the subject, aiming to build up knowledge that could help ensure the mental well-being of police officers and lead to improved training guidelines. (2017-05-19)

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