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Current Ionic liquids News and Events

Current Ionic liquids News and Events, Ionic liquids News Articles.
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Science snapshots -- Waste to fuel, moire superlattices, mining cellphones for energy data
As reported in Nature Physics, a Berkeley Lab-led team of physicists and materials scientists was the first to unambiguously observe and document the unique optical phenomena that occur in certain types of synthetic materials called moire; superlattices. (2019-10-10)
New 3D printing technique for biomaterials
A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants. (2019-10-04)
Vaping-associated lung injury may be caused by toxic chemical fumes, study finds
Research into the pathology of vaping-associated lung injury is in its early stages, but a Mayo Clinic study published in The New England Journal of Medicine finds that lung injuries from vaping most likely are caused by direct toxicity or tissue damage from noxious chemical fumes. (2019-10-02)
Researchers synthesize new liquid crystals allowing directed transmission of electricity
Liquid and solid - most people are unaware that there can be states in between. (2019-10-01)
Shape affects performance of micropillars in heat transfer
A Washington University in St. Louis researcher has shown for the first time that the shape of a nanostructure has an effect on its ability to retain water. (2019-10-01)
NIST goes with the (slow) flow: New technique could improve biotech, precision medicine
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed an optical system that accurately measures the flow of extraordinarily tiny amounts of liquids -- as small as 10 billionths of a liter (nanoliters) per minute. (2019-09-26)
Safe solution to mop up oil spills: QUT research breakthrough
QUT researchers have come up with a new, safe way to clean up oil spills using compounds equally useful as common household cleaning products. (2019-09-24)
Study suggests flavored e-cigarettes may worsen asthma
A study into the impact of flavored e-cigarettes, on allergic airways disease, suggests that some flavors may worsen the severity of diseases such as asthma. (2019-09-20)
Scientists construct energy production unit for a synthetic cell
Scientists at the University of Groningen have constructed synthetic vesicles in which ATP, the main energy carrier in living cells, is produced. (2019-09-18)
Flavoring ingredient exceeds safety levels in e-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco
A potential carcinogen that has been banned as a food additive is present in concerningly high levels in electronic cigarette liquids and smokeless tobacco products, according to a new study from Duke Health. (2019-09-16)
A novel tool to probe fundamental matter
The origin of matter remains a complex and open question. (2019-09-16)
Innovative method provides unique insights into the structure of cells and tissues
Cells are the basic building blocks of life. The chemical composition of cells can be determined by mass spectrometry. (2019-09-06)
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, September 2019
ORNL story tips: ORNL's project for VA bridges computing prowess, VA health data to speed up suicide risk screenings for US veterans; ORNL reveals ionic liquid additive lubricates better than additives in commercial gear oil; researchers use neutron scattering to probe colorful new material that could improve sensors, vivid displays; unique 3D printing approach adds more strength, toughness in certain materials. (2019-09-04)
A new way to measure how water moves
A new method to measure pore structure and water flow can help scientists more accurately and cheaply determine how fast water, contaminants, nutrients and other liquids move through the soil -- and where they go. (2019-08-29)
Researchers describe a mechanism inducing self-killing of cancer cells
A KAIST research team has developed helical polypeptide potassium ionophores that lead to the onset of programmed cell death. (2019-08-28)
E-cigs can trigger same lung changes seen in smokers, emphysema
In a study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the UNC scientists found that the lungs of vapers -- like the lungs of smokers -- have elevated levels of protease enzymes, a condition known to cause emphysema in smokers. (2019-08-22)
Artificial muscles bloom, dance, and wave
Researchers from KAIST have developed an ultrathin, artificial muscle for soft robotics. (2019-08-21)
Supercapacitors turbocharged by laxatives
An international team of scientists, including a professor of chemistry from the University of Bristol, has worked out a way to improve energy storage devices called supercapacitors, by designing a new class of detergents chemically related to laxatives. (2019-08-12)
Dyes and viruses create new composite material for photooxidation reactions
A recent study, published in Advanced Materials, shows that native viruses can be employed as a scaffold to immobilise photoactive molecules to potentially oxidise organic pollutants present in wastewater, under visible light irradiation. (2019-08-12)
Using lasers to visualize molecular mysteries in our atmosphere
Molecular interactions between gases and liquids underpin much of our lives, but difficulties in measuring gas-liquid collisions have so far prevented the fundamental exploration of these processes. (2019-08-08)
Scientists reveal key insights into emerging water purification technology
While it holds promise, membrane distillation doesn't work perfectly. A key challenge is designing membranes to purify water efficiently while ensuring zero contamination of the clean water. (2019-08-07)
Ionic thermal up-diffusion boosts energy harvesting
Recently nanofluidic salinity gradient energy harvesting via ion channels or membranes has drawn increasing concerns due to the advances in materials science and nanotechnology, which exhibits much higher power density than the macro reverse electrodialysis systems, indicating its potential to harvest the huge amount blue energy released by mixing seawater and river water and enhance power extracted for osmotic heat engines. (2019-08-06)
Supercomputing improves biomass fuel conversion
Pretreating plant biomass with THF-water causes lignin globules on the cellulose surface to expand and break away from one another and the cellulose fibers. (2019-08-01)
Snake fang-like patch quickly delivers liquid medicines in rodents
Scientists have created a microneedle patch based on the fangs of a snake that can deliver therapeutic liquids and a vaccine through the skin of rodents in under 15 seconds. (2019-07-31)
Researchers produce electricity by flowing water over extremely thin layers of metal
Scientists from Northwestern University and Caltech have produced electricity by simply flowing water over extremely thin layers of inexpensive metals, including iron, that have oxidized. (2019-07-31)
Scientists cook up new recipes for taking salt out of seawater
As populations boom and chronic droughts persist, coastal cities like Carlsbad in Southern California have increasingly turned to ocean desalination to supplement a dwindling fresh water supply. (2019-07-31)
Ultrathin transistors for faster computer chips
The next big miniaturization step in microelectronics could soon become possible -- with so-called two-dimensional materials. (2019-07-24)
New laws of attraction: Scientists print magnetic liquid droplets
Scientists at Berkeley Lab have made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. (2019-07-18)
Early mammal fossil reveals the evolutionary origins of having a loose tongue
Our highly mobile mammalian tongues, which allow us to swallow chewed food and suckle milk as babies, may have evolutionary origins in some of our most early mammalioform ancestors, according to a new study, which finds remarkably complex and modern mammal-like hyoid bones in a newly discovered 165-million-year-old mammaliaform species. (2019-07-18)
A new material for the battery of the future, made in UCLouvain
UCLouvain's researchers have discovered a new high performance and safe battery material (LTPS) capable of speeding up charge and discharge to a level never observed so far. (2019-07-17)
Improving heat recycling with the thermodiffusion effect
In a study recently published in EPJ E, researchers find that the absorption of water vapour within industrial heat recycling devices is directly tied to a physical process known as the thermodiffusion effect. (2019-07-15)
New superomniphobic glass soars high on butterfly wings using machine learning
Glass for technologies like displays, tablets, laptops, smartphones, and solar cells need to pass light through, but could benefit from a surface that repels water, dirt, oil, and other liquids. (2019-07-11)
'Liquid forensics' could lead to safer drinking water
Ping! The popular 1990 film, The Hunt for Red October, helped introduce sonar technology on submarines to pop culture. (2019-07-08)
SMU's 'Titans in a jar' could answer key questions ahead of NASA's space exploration
Researchers from Southern Methodist University (SMU) could help determine if Saturn's icy moon -- Titan -- has ever been home to life long before NASA completes an exploratory visit to its surface by a drone helicopter. (2019-07-03)
A new path to understanding second sound in Bose-Einstein condensates
There are two sound velocities in a Bose-Einstein condensate. In addition to the normal sound propagation there is second sound, which is a quantum phenomenon. (2019-07-02)
UH researcher reports the way sickle cells form may be key to stopping them
University of Houston chemist Vassiliy Lubchenko is reporting a new finding in Nature Communications on how sickle cells are formed, which may lead not only to stopping their formation, but to new avenues for making uniformly-sized nanoparticles for industry. (2019-07-02)
Theoretical physicists unveil one of the most ubiquitous and elusive concepts in chemistry
Even if we study them at school, oxidation numbers have so far eluded any rigorous quantum mechanical definition. (2019-07-01)
Insects inspire greener, cheaper membranes for desalination
Insect-inspired design principles lead to first-ever water-repellent membranes made from water-wet materials. (2019-06-30)
Soft robots for all
Each year, soft robots gain new abilities. They can jump, squirm, and grip. (2019-06-26)
Upcycling process brings new life to old jeans
A growing population, rising standards of living and quickly changing fashions send mountains of clothing waste to the world's landfills each year. (2019-06-19)
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