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Current Ions News and Events, Ions News Articles.
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Optical wiring for large quantum computers
Researchers at ETH have demonstrated a new technique for carrying out sensitive quantum operations on atoms. (2020-10-22)
RUDN University chemist suggested synthesizing bioactive substances using a copper catalyst
A chemist from RUDN University used a copper catalyst in the click reaction of triazole synthesis. (2020-10-22)
Oxygen can do a favor to synthesize metal-organic frameworks
IBS scienetists have identified how oxygen affects the synthesis of a novel metal-organic framework. (2020-10-21)
Highly selective membranes
Membranes with microscopic pores are useful for water filtration. The effect of pore size on water filtration is well-understood, as is the role of ions, charged atoms, that interact with the membrane. (2020-10-20)
Computational study reveals how Ebola nucleocapsid stabilizes
Scientists at the University of Delaware report a computational study of the Ebola virus nucleocapsid and show that the binding of the ssRNA allows the nucleocapsid to maintain its shape and structural integrity. (2020-10-20)
Calcium bursts kill drug-resistant tumor cells
Multidrug resistance (MDR) -- a process in which tumors become resistant to multiple medicines -- is the main cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. (2020-10-16)
A controllable membrane to pull carbon dioxide out of exhaust streams
A system developed by chemical engineers at MIT could provide a way of continuously removing carbon dioxide from a stream of waste gases, or even from the air. (2020-10-16)
LiU researchers first to develop an organic battery
Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have for the first time demonstrated an organic battery. (2020-10-15)
Using electric current to stabilize low-permeability soils
EPFL scientists have developed a new approach to stabilizing clay soils. (2020-10-12)
New mechanism affecting nerve impulses discovered
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have discovered a new mechanism by which substances can open a certain type of ion channel and in this way regulate nerve impulses. (2020-10-12)
Groundbreaking study finds activator of magnesium dynamics in the body
Magnesium, essential for life, has puzzled medical science for a century. (2020-10-08)
Our health: New focus on the synergy effect of nanoparticles
Nanoparticles are valuable and useful in many products, but according to a new study, they can also damage our cells. (2020-10-01)
Metal-ion breakthrough leads to new biomaterials
Metals such as iron and calcium play a crucial role inside the human body, so it's no surprise that bioengineers would like to integrate them into the soft, stretchy materials used to repair skin, blood vessels, lungs and other tissue. (2020-09-30)
Scientists studied nanoparticles embedded in silver-ion-exchanged glasses
Researchers have registered the formation of silver nanoparticles in an ion-exchanged glass as a result of infrared laser irradiation. (2020-09-29)
Generating renewable hydrogen fuel from the sea
The power of the sun, wind and sea may soon combine to produce clean-burning hydrogen fuel, according to a team of Penn State researchers. (2020-09-29)
The key to lowering CO2 emissions is made of metal
Researchers at Osaka City University produce malic acid, which contains 4 carbon atoms, through artificial photosynthesis by simply adding metal ions like aluminum and iron. (2020-09-28)
Bioelectronic device achieves unprecedented control of cell membrane voltage
Every living cell maintains a voltage across the cell membrane that results from differences in the concentrations of charged ions inside and outside the cell. (2020-09-24)
New materials: A toggle switch for catalysis
A special material made of lanthanum, strontium, iron and oxygen can be switched back and forth between two different states: In one state the material is catalytically extremely active, in the other less so. (2020-09-23)
New discovery to have huge impact on development of future battery cathodes
New paper in Nature Energy, reveals how researchers fully identified the nature of oxidised oxygen in the important battery material - Li-rich NMC - using RIXS (Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering) at Diamond Light Source. (2020-09-21)
Promising computer simulations for stellarator plasmas
The turbulence code GENE (Gyrokinetic Electromagnetic Numerical Experiment), developed at Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) at Garching, Germany, has proven to be very useful for the theoretical description of turbulence in the plasma of tokamak-type fusion devices. (2020-09-18)
Shedding light on the development of efficient blue-emitting semiconductors
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have discovered a new alkali copper halide, Cs5Cu3Cl6I2, that emits pure blue light. (2020-09-17)
Halogen bonding: a powerful tool for constructing supramolecular co-crystalline materials
Halogen bonding is emerging as an important driving force for supramolecular self-assembly, and shows great potential in the design and synthesis of new multicomponent supramolecular co-crystalline materials. (2020-09-14)
Multiphase buffering by ammonia explains wide range of atmospheric aerosol acidity
Anthropogenic ammonia emissions and the water content matter more than dry particle composition for the acidity of atmospheric aerosols in populated regions. (2020-09-10)
Mineral undergoes self-healing of irradiation damage
Several minerals suffer radioactive self-irradiation and hence experience long-term changes of their properties. (2020-09-09)
New method prevents quantum computers from crashing
Quantum information is fragile, which is why quantum computers must be able to correct errors. (2020-09-09)
Scientists probe the chemistry of a single battery electrode particle both inside and out
Cracks and chemical reactions on a battery particle's surface can degrade performance, and the particle's ability to absorb and release lithium ions also changes over time. (2020-09-08)
Chemistry's Feng Lin Lab is splitting water molecules for a renewable energy future
Feng Lin, an assistant professor of chemistry in the Virginia Tech College of Science, is focusing on energy storage and conversion research. (2020-09-04)
A new way of modulating color emissions from transparent films
Transparent luminescent materials have several applications; but so far, few multicolor light-emitting solid transparent materials exist in which the color of emission is tunable. (2020-09-02)
Study details how general anesthetics and 'benzos' act on receptors in the brain
As you drift into unconsciousness before a surgery, general anesthetic drugs flowing through your blood are putting you to sleep by binding mainly to a protein in the brain called the ?-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor. (2020-09-02)
Excitable cells
A study led by researchers from Tasmania, Chile and Germany has furthered our understanding of plant evolution by tracking the origins of electrical signalling components that plants developed to communicate and adapt to life on land. (2020-09-02)
Revisiting ratios
There's more to seawater than salt. Ocean chemistry is a complex mixture of particles, ions and nutrients. (2020-09-01)
Allergic reaction: How the immune system identifies nickel
The metal nickel is one of the most common triggers of allergic contact dermatitis in humans. (2020-08-31)
How plants close their gates when microbes attack
Like humans, plants protect themselves against pathogens. An international consortium under the lead of UZH professor Cyril Zipfel has now identified a long sought-after factor of this plant immune system: The calcium channel triggers the closure of stomata upon contact with microbes such as bacteria. (2020-08-26)
Faster, more efficient energy storage could stem from holistic study of layered materials
A team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed a novel, integrated approach to track energy-transporting ions within an ultra-thin material, which could unlock its energy storage potential leading toward faster charging, longer lasting devices. (2020-08-25)
Sussex study enables predicting computational power of early quantum computers
University of Sussex quantum physicists have developed an algorithm which helps early quantum computers to perform calculations most efficiently (2020-08-24)
One more hit from rare Earth: Efficient coherent spin manipulation by the electric field
Researchers used rare earth ions to efficiently couple the electric and magnetic behaviors of material. (2020-08-21)
Cyclohexyl phenyl sulfide cleavage studied for degradation of sulfur-containing heavy oil
So far, the KFU team has proven copper compounds are the most effective in producing catalysts for heavy oil extraction. (2020-08-20)
Toward an ultrahigh energy density capacitor
Researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have demonstrated that a common material can be processed into a top-performing energy storage material. (2020-08-19)
A bright idea -- Genetically engineered proteins for studying neurons using light
In neuroscience, tools for controlling the activation and deactivation of individual nerve cells are crucial to gain insights into their functions and characteristics. (2020-08-18)
Ultra-low voltage proven effective at killing bacteria, study finds
Research into the antimicrobial properties of ultra-low voltage electricity demonstrates that the power creates holes in the bacteria's outer membrane allowing two-way leakage and ultimately killing the cell. (2020-08-17)
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