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Current Iron News and Events

Current Iron News and Events, Iron News Articles.
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New research supports volcanic origin of Kiruna-type iron ores
The origin of giant apatite-iron oxide ores of the so-called 'Kiruna-type' has been the topic of a long standing debate that has lasted for over 100 years. (2019-04-12)
Earliest life may have arisen in ponds, not oceans
Primitive ponds may have provided a suitable environment for brewing up Earth's first life forms, more so than oceans, a new MIT study finds. (2019-04-12)
Half-hearted: New insight into why the heart doesn't develop properly in some children
Investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina have found evidence that the gene Ccdc117 supports the rapid growth of precursor cells needed for proper development of right-sided heart structures. (2019-04-09)
Iron volcanoes may have erupted on metal asteroids
Metallic asteroids are thought to have started out as blobs of molten iron floating in space. (2019-04-08)
Tracking records of the oldest life forms on Earth
Ancient organic matter of biological origin has been tracked in multiple samples of rock spanning over 2,000 million years of Earth's history, according to UCL researchers. (2019-04-08)
Heavy metal planet fragment survives destruction from dead star
A fragment of a planet that has survived the death of its star has been discovered by University of Warwick astronomers in a disc of debris formed from destroyed planets, which the star ultimately consumes. (2019-04-04)
study looks to iron from microbes for climate help
Distributing iron particles produced by bacteria could 'fertilize' microscopic ocean plants and ultimately lower atmospheric carbon levels, according to a new paper in Frontiers. (2019-04-03)
Do minerals play a role in development of multiple sclerosis?
Some studies have suggested that minerals such as zinc and iron may play a role in how multiple sclerosis (MS) progresses, once people have been diagnosed with it. (2019-04-03)
Cleaning up oil using magnets
In the future, it could be possible to remove oil spills on the surface of the ocean by using magnets. (2019-04-01)
Simplified synthesis
For the first time researchers discovered a simple and highly efficient way to produce certain kinds of organic compounds. (2019-03-27)
Fish-inspired material changes color using nanocolumns
Inspired by the flashing colors of the neon tetra fish, researchers have developed a technique for changing the color of a material by manipulating the orientation of nanostructured columns in the material. (2019-03-20)
'Terminator'-like liquid metal moves and stretches in 3D space (video)
In the blockbuster 'Terminator' movie franchise, an evil robot morphs into different human forms and objects and oozes through narrow openings, thanks to its 'liquid-metal' composition. (2019-03-20)
Researchers find cost-effective method for hydrogen fuel production process
U of A researchers have identified an inexpensive way to boost the efficiency of a process used to create hydrogen, a clean, renewable fuel. (2019-03-19)
A lawn is better than fertilizer for growing healthy blueberries
A new study shows that growing grasses alongside blueberry plants corrects signs of iron deficiency, with associated improvements in berry quantity and quality. (2019-03-12)
Iron measurements with MRI reveal stroke's impact on brain
A simple MRI method that measures iron content can provide a more comprehensive picture of the consequences of stroke-related damage to the brain, according to a new study. (2019-03-12)
Scientists go to extremes to reveal make-up of Earth's core
Experiments conducted at extreme conditions are giving scientists new insights into the chemical make-up of the Earth's core. (2019-03-12)
Fusion science and astronomy collaboration enables investigation of the origin of heavy elements
Atomic physicists working on nuclear fusion research succeeded in computing the world's highest accuracy atomic data of neodymium ions which is used in analysis of the light from a binary neutron star merger. (2019-03-11)
Stressing and straining: Geochemists answer fundamental question of mineral reactions
In a new study from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, scientists placed small iron oxide particles in an acidic solution, causing a reaction at the surface as iron atoms oxidized. (2019-03-07)
Mystery of green icebergs may soon be solved
Researchers have proposed a new idea that may explain why some Antarctic icebergs are tinged emerald green rather than the normal blue, potentially solving a decades-long scientific mystery. (2019-03-04)
Physicists solve 35-year-old mystery about quarks
Physicists from Tel Aviv University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility now know why quarks, the building blocks of the universe, move more slowly inside atomic nuclei, solving a 35-year-old-mystery. (2019-03-04)
A water-splitting catalyst unlike any other
EPFL chemists have developed a new iron-nickel oxide catalyst for water splitting, the reaction that produces hydrogen fuel. (2019-02-27)
Thirty years of fast food: Greater variety, but more salt, larger portions, and added calories
Despite the addition of some healthful menu items, fast food is even more unhealthy for you than it was 30 years ago. (2019-02-27)
Yeasts reach across tree of life to domesticate suite of bacterial genes
New research finds that some yeast picked up a whole suite of genes from bacteria that gave them the new ability to scavenge iron from their environment. (2019-02-21)
Pioneering study could offer protection to patients with rare genetic disease
Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a healthy population, according to new research from the University of Bath. (2019-02-21)
Native California medicinal plant may hold promise for treating Alzheimer's
The medicinal powers of aspirin, digitalis, and the anti-malarial artemisinin all come from plants. (2019-02-20)
Study: Adolescent female blood donors at risk for iron deficiency and associated anemia
Female adolescent blood donors are more likely to have low iron stores and iron deficiency anemia than adult female blood donors and nondonors, which could have significant negative consequences on their developing brains, a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests. (2019-02-19)
What happens to magnetic nanoparticles once in cells?
Although magnetic nanoparticles are being used more and more in cell imaging and tissue bioengineering, what happens to them within stem cells in the long term remained undocumented. (2019-02-14)
Spintronics by 'straintronics'
Data storage in magnetic media is very energy consuming. Novel materials could reduce the energy needed to control magnetic memories thus contributing to a smaller carbon footprint of the IT sector. (2019-02-14)
Study unfolds a new class of mechanical devices
In a paper published today in Science Robotics, engineers at Brigham Young University detail new technology that allows them to build complex mechanisms into the exterior of a structure without taking up any actual space below the surface. (2019-02-13)
URI study shows benefits of delayed cord clamping in healthy babies
A five-minute delay in the clamping of healthy infants' umbilical cords results in increased iron stores and brain myelin in areas important for early-life functional development, a new University of Rhode Island nursing study has found. (2019-02-09)
Mixed results on early human testing of iron chelation after brain bleed
Removing iron and toxins from the body after a brain bleed had little effect on intracerebral hemorrhage stroke recovery at three months but might have potential benefits at six months. (2019-02-08)
Rust never sleeps
PNNL researchers have been able to observe in unprecedented detail how rust happens. (2019-02-04)
How plants cope with iron deficiency
Research groups from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and the University of Münster (WWU) have discovered a new switch that plants use to control their responses to iron deficiency. (2019-02-01)
Magnetic teeth hold promise for materials and energy
For the first time, a team led by Okayama University and the University of California, Riverside has discovered a piece of the genetic puzzle that allows the chiton to produce magnetite nanomaterials. (2019-02-01)
NASA's NICER mission maps 'light echoes' of new black hole
Scientists have charted the environment surrounding a stellar-mass black hole that is 10 times the mass of the Sun using NASA's Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) aboard the International Space Station. (2019-01-30)
Cassava high in iron and zinc could improve diets and health in west Africa
A new study led by Danforth Center principal investigator Nigel Taylor and research scientist Narayanan Narayanan, shows that field-grown cassava plants overexpressing a combination of plant genes can accumulate significantly higher concentrations of iron and zinc. (2019-01-28)
Stellar winds, the source material for the universe, are clumpy
Data recorded by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory of a neutron star as it passed through a dense patch of stellar wind emanating from its massive companion star provide valuable insight about the structure and composition of stellar winds. (2019-01-24)
Stars shrouded in iron dust
The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has participated in a study which has discovered a group of stars very poor in metals and shrouded in a high fraction of iron dust, situated in the Large Magellanic Cloud. (2019-01-23)
Common gene disorder causes serious 'stealth' disease, but could be easily treated
The western world's most common genetic disorder is a 'stealth condition' that causes far higher levels of serious disease and disability than previously thought, despite being easy to detect and treat. (2019-01-16)
Common genetic disorder linked to more disease than previously thought
The most common genetic disorder in people from northern Europe is associated with substantially higher levels of disease than previously thought, despite being easy to detect and treat, finds a study published in The BMJ today. (2019-01-16)
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