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Current Irrigation News and Events

Current Irrigation News and Events, Irrigation News Articles.
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Can oilfield water safely be reused for irrigation in California?
Reusing low-saline oilfield water mixed with surface water to irrigate farms in the Cawelo Water District of California does not pose major health risks, as some opponents of the practice have feared, a study led by Duke University and RTI International researchers finds. (2020-05-22)
Expansion, environmental impacts of irrigation by 2050 greatly underestimated
New research suggests that the amount of farmland that will need to be irrigated to feed the global population by 2050 could be up to several billion acres, far higher than scientists currently project. (2020-05-04)
Changes in snowmelt threaten farmers in western US
Farmers in parts of the western United States who rely on snowmelt to help irrigate their crops will be among the hardest hit in the world by climate change, a new study reveals. (2020-04-20)
Returning land to nature with high-yield farming
The expansion of farmlands to meet the growing food demand of the world's ever expanding population places a heavy burden on natural ecosystems. (2020-04-16)
Turned-down temperatures boost crops' penchant for production
Drought and heat put stress on plants and reduce grain yield. (2020-04-14)
Groundwater, a threatened resource requiring sustainable management
The WEARE group at the University of Cordoba analyzed a case of aquifer recovery and concluded that supervision, governance and use of water for high value crops are some of the keys to guaranteeing sustainability of these reserves (2020-04-03)
PKU's Zhou Feng and collaborators report the performance of water conservation in China
The deceleration of water use revealed in this study partly challenges the results from global hydrological models, which commonly suggest an increase of total water use across China over the period 1971 to 2010. (2020-04-01)
Almond orchard recycling a climate-smart strategy
Recycling orchard trees onsite can sequester carbon, save water and increase crop yields, making it a climate-smart practice for California's irrigated almond orchards, finds a study from the University of California, Davis. (2020-04-01)
Planning for future water security in China
China's fast economic growth and accompanying rise in food demand is driving an increase in water use for agriculture and industry, thus threatening the country's water security. (2020-03-24)
Damaging impacts of warming moderated by migration of rainfed crops
Many studies seek to estimate the adverse effects of climate change on crops, but most research assumes that the geographic distribution of crops will remain unchanged in the future. (2020-03-06)
Fallowing cattle-feed farmland simplest way to alleviate western water shortage
An important new study published this week in Nature Sustainability finds that irrigated crop production accounts for 86 percent of all water consumed in the western US--and of all the water used on western farms, by far the largest portion goes to cattle-feed crops such as alfalfa and grass hay. (2020-03-02)
Beef consumption hurting river quality
A new study shows irrigation of cattle feed crops is the greatest consumer of river water in the Western United States, implicating beef and dairy consumption as the leading driver of water shortages and fish imperilment in the region. (2020-03-02)
Irrigation alleviates hot extremes
Researchers from ETH Zurich and other universities found evidence that expanding irrigation has dampened anthropogenic warming during hot days, with particularly strong effects over South Asia. (2020-01-15)
New research finds ranchers consider diverse factors in managing their land
In a new study published in Rangeland Ecology and Management, Ashley Dayer, an assistant professor in the Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation in the College of Natural Resources and Environment at Virginia Tech, explores the diverse factors that influence how ranchers manage their land. (2020-01-14)
Specifying irrigation needs for container-grown plants
Open-field production of 524,000 irrigated acres of horticultural plants in the United States used 205 billion gallons of water in a recent year. (2020-01-06)
Benefits of integrating cover crop with broiler litter in no-till dryland cotton systems
Although most cotton is grown in floodplain soils in the Mississippi Delta region, a large amount of cotton is also grown under no-till systems on upland soils that are vulnerable to erosion and have reduced organic matter. (2020-01-06)
Water management grows farm profits
A study investigates effects of irrigation management on yield and profit. (2019-12-04)
Less rice, more nutritious crops will enhance India's food supply
India can sustainably enhance its food supply if its farmers plant less rice and more nutritious and environmentally-friendly crops, including finger millet, pearl millet, and sorghum, according to a new study from the Data Science Institute at Columbia University. (2019-12-04)
Rural decline not driven by water recovery
New research from the University of Adelaide has shown that climate and economic factors are the main drivers of farmers leaving their properties in the Murray-Darling Basin, not reduced water for irrigation as commonly claimed. (2019-12-04)
A study compares how water is managed in Spain, California and Australia
Legislative changes in these three regions always come about due to drought crises but they show important differences. (2019-11-25)
Increase in cannabis cultivation or residential development could impact water resources
Cannabis cultivation could have a significant effect on groundwater and surface water resources when combined with residential use, evidence from a new study suggests. (2019-11-22)
Beyond the green revolution
There has been a substantial increase in food production over the last 50 years, but it has been accompanied by a narrowing in the diversity of cultivated crops. (2019-11-19)
Implementing no-till and cover crops in Texas cotton systems
Healthy soil leads to productive and sustainable agriculture. Farmers who work with, not against, the soil can improve the resiliency of their land. (2019-11-18)
What felled the great Assyrian Empire? A Yale professor weighs in
The Neo-Assyrian Empire, centered in northern Iraq and extending from Iran to Egypt -- the largest empire of its time -- collapsed after more than two centuries of dominance at the fall of its capital, Nineveh, in 612 B.C.E. (2019-11-14)
Knowing your neighbors may shape US household yard care practices
Neighbor peer pressure may be linked to increases in yard fertilization and irrigation across several distinct climate regions of the US, according to a study published Nov. (2019-11-13)
Ant expert discovers newly emergent species in his backyard
Jack Longino is a global ant expert and has traveled the world documenting and discovering ant species. (2019-11-12)
Research suggests fumigants have very low long-term impact on soil health
It started with curiosity. How does a fumigant, commonly used for nematode management in potato cropping systems, influence soil microbial communities? (2019-11-07)
How the Aztecs could improve modern urban farming
Highly intensive production systems with low resource demand are a strategic goal of urban agriculture developers. (2019-11-01)
Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems
A new Colorado State University study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. (2019-10-31)
Palestinian farmers benefit from Birmingham water technology project
University of Birmingham scientists have worked with international students to produce prototype desalination equipment that could help Palestinian farmers avoid water shortages and grow crops efficiently. (2019-10-31)
Climate change could drive British crop farming north and west
Unchecked climate change could drive Britain's crop growing north and west, leaving the east and south east unable to support crop growing, new research suggests. (2019-10-29)
Strong winter dust storms may have caused the collapse of the Akkadian Empire
Fossil coral records provide new evidence that frequent winter shamals, or dust storms, and a prolonged cold winter season contributed to the collapse of the ancient Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia. (2019-10-24)
First report of cotton blue disease in the United States
Reported from six counties in coastal Alabama in 2017, cotton blue disease affected approximately 25% of the state's cotton crop and caused a 4% yield loss. (2019-10-17)
Rice irrigation worsened landslides in deadliest earthquake of 2018 finds NTU study
Irrigation significantly exacerbated the earthquake-triggered landslides in Palu, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, in 2018, according to an international study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists. (2019-10-08)
Engineers produce water-saving crop irrigation sensor
Developed by the team of UConn engineers -- environmental, mechanical, and chemical -- the sensors expected to save nearly 35% of water consumption and cost far less than what exists. (2019-09-26)
UMD CONSERVE Center leading effort to advance water and food security
We're running out of water to grow food and the UMD CONSERVE Center of Excellence is leading the effort to develop and adopt solutions. (2019-09-26)
Stopping progression of tissue injury after button battery ingestion
Button battery injuries in children have been increasingly severe -- resulting in devastating injuries and even death. (2019-09-05)
Agrivoltaics proves mutually beneficial across food, water, energy nexus
Building resilience in renewable energy and food production is a fundamental challenge in today's changing world, especially in regions susceptible to heat and drought. (2019-09-03)
Scientists successfully innoculate, grow crops in salt-damaged soil
A group of researchers may have found a way to reverse falling crop yields caused by increasingly salty farmlands throughout the world. (2019-08-22)
Shift to more intense rains threatens historic Italian winery
Wine lovers may appreciate a dry white, but a lack of steady rainfall brought on by a changing climate is threatening a centuries old winemaking tradition in Italy, according to an international team of scientists. (2019-08-21)
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