Current Jellyfish News and Events

Current Jellyfish News and Events, Jellyfish News Articles.
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Time for total rethink on the management of alien species
A new study led by the University of Plymouth and the Marine and Environmental Research (MER) Lab in Cyprus is calling for a complete rethink of how non-indigenous or alien species are considered in the future (2020-11-26)

To push or to pull? How many-limbed marine organisms swim
Couinter-intuitively, small marine animals don't use their limbs or propulsors to push themselves through the water while swimming. Instead, their appendages create negative pressure behind them that pulls the animal through the water, scientists from the Marine Biological Laboratory report. (2020-11-24)

Decaying jellyfish blooms can cause temporary changes to water column food webs
Decaying jellyfish blooms fuel the rapid growth of just a few specific strains of seawater bacteria, causing temporary changes to the water column food web. This is the finding of a new study furthering our understanding of how jellyfish blooms, which are happening with increasing frequency, impact marine ecosystems. It details these fast-growing bacteria effectively reduce the amount of jellyfish detrital material reaching the seafloor, keeping it instead within the water column food web. (2020-10-30)

Tube-dwelling anemone toxins have pharmacological potential, mapping study shows
Analysis identified 525 genes encoding proteins that act on the nervous system, cardiovascular system and cell walls. One of the molecules proved effective against cancer cells in preliminary test results. (2020-10-29)

Drones as stinger spotters
Researchers from James Cook University in Cairns have demonstrated, for the first time, the potential for off-the-shelf drones to be used to detect deadly box jellyfish. (2020-10-29)

Newly discovered gene may give 'sea pickles' their glow
A new study describes a bioluminescent gene that could be the reason that so-called 'sea pickles,' or pyrosomes, an underwater free-floating colony of thousands of tiny animals, reverberate in blue-green light. If confirmed, the finding would be the first bioluminescent gene identified from a chordate--the group that includes all vertebrates as well as a couple types of invertebrates: sea squirts (including pyrosomes) and lancelets. (2020-10-20)

Mystery over decline in sea turtle sightings
The number of sea turtles spotted along the coasts of the UK and Ireland has declined in recent years, researchers say. (2020-10-18)

Jellyfish with your chips?
Jellyfish could replace fish and chips on a new sustainable takeaway menu to help keep threatened species off the plate. University of Queensland researchers found 92 endangered and 11 critically endangered species of seafood were caught in oceans around the world after analysing global industrial fishing records. (2020-09-21)

Scientists studied color change from green to red in the fluorescent protein
Researchers undertook a detailed study on green-to-red photoconversion (light-induced conversion) of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). In their recent study, scientists from Skoltech and their colleagues describe the molecular mechanism of photoconversion in detail for the first time ever. (2020-09-16)

Marine animals live where ocean is most breathable, ranges may shrink with climate change
New research from the University of Washington shows that a wide variety of marine animals -- from vertebrates to crustaceans to mollusks -- already inhabit the maximum range of breathable ocean that their physiology will allow. The findings provide a warning about climate change: Since warmer waters will harbor less oxygen, some stretches of ocean that are breathable today for a given species may not be in the future. (2020-09-16)

Analyzing the factors that enable fish to reproduce in the Gulf of Cadiz
The Guadalquivir estuary showed the highest density of early stages fish and also of macro-zooplankton (fish prey). A higher concentration of organic matter (preferential food of the macrozooplanton in the Guadalquivir), provided by a greater flow of fresh water and correlated with total suspended solids, inorganic matter and turbidity, were the most typical characteristics of the Guadalquivir. (2020-08-13)

Fluorescent peptide nanoparticles, in every color of the rainbow
The discovery of green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is made by a jellyfish, transformed cell biology. It allowed scientists to stitch the GFP sequence to proteins from other organisms to trace their movements and interactions in living cells. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have designed peptide nanoparticles that can each glow in a variety of colors, opening the door for many new biomedical applications. (2020-07-08)

BU researchers design artificial genes to sense cellular responses to drugs
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have developed and implemented a new way to better understand how human cells communicate with each other, how this communication. (2020-07-06)

Jellyfish-inspired soft robots can outswim their natural counterparts
Engineering researchers have developed soft robots inspired by jellyfish that can outswim their real-life counterparts. More practically, the new jellyfish-bots highlight a technique that uses pre-stressed polymers to make soft robots more powerful. (2020-07-01)

Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?
New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals. As jellyfish blooms become more frequent and more massive, this could affect marine ecosystems. (2020-06-24)

What makes a giant jellyfish's sting deadly
With summer on the way, and some beaches reopening after COVID-19 shutdowns, people will be taking to the ocean to cool off on a hot day. But those unlucky enough to encounter the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai (also known as Nomura's jellyfish) might wish they had stayed on shore. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research have identified the key toxins that make the creature's venom deadly to some swimmers. (2020-06-10)

The consequences of exploiting the ocean depths
A group of international experts has just published an article in the prestigious review Nature in which they suggest responses to question such as how organisms live in the Twilight zone and how diverse they are; which organic processes transform and consume the zone's organic material; and how the organic material is carried into and out of it (2020-06-01)

Under pressure, black holes feast
A new, Yale-led study shows that some supermassive black holes actually thrive under pressure. It has been known for some time that when distant galaxies -- and the supermassive black holes within their cores -- aggregate into clusters, these clusters create a volatile, highly pressurized environment. Individual galaxies falling into clusters are often deformed during the process and begin to resemble cosmic jellyfish. (2020-05-27)

Shrinking snowcaps fuel harmful algal blooms in Arabian sea
A uniquely resilient organism all but unheard of in the Arabian Sea 20 years ago has been proliferating and spreading at an alarming pace. New research describes how the continued loss of snow over the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau region is fueling the expansion of this destructive algal bloom. (2020-05-04)

Sea turtles have a deadly attraction to stinky plastic
Sea turtles around the world are threatened by marine plastic debris, mostly through ingestion and entanglement. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on March 9 have new evidence to explain why all that plastic is so dangerous for the turtles: they mistake the scent of stinky plastic for food. (2020-03-09)

Jellyfish help understand the timing of egg production
In animals, releasing eggs in a timely manner is vital to maximize the chances of successful fertilization. However, how this process evolved and is controlled in different species is poorly understood. A new regulator of egg release has been identified in jellyfish in a new study published March 3 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Gonzalo Quiroga Artigas and Evelyn Houliston of Sorbonne University, France, and colleagues. The finding sheds light on how the complex hormonal control of sexual reproduction in animals evolved. (2020-03-03)

Tel Aviv University researchers discover unique non-oxygen breathing animal
Researchers at Tel Aviv University (TAU) have discovered a non-oxygen breathing animal. The unexpected finding changes one of science's assumptions about the animal world. (2020-02-25)

Soft robot fingers gently grasp deep-sea jellyfish
Marine biologists have adopted ''soft robotic linguine fingers'' as tools to conduct their undersea research. In a study appearing February 24 in the journal Current Biology, scientists found that jellyfish held by ultra-soft robotic fingers expressed significantly fewer stress-related genes than when braced by traditional submersible grippers. Shaped like the famous noodles, this new robotic technology allows for the collection of ecological data in a gentler, less invasive manner. (2020-02-24)

NUI Galway highlights reproductive flexibility in hydractinia, a Galway bay jellyfish
A new study, led by Dr Tim DuBuc and Professor Uri Frank from the Centre for Chromosome Biology at NUI Galway, has found that Hydractinia, a North Atlantic jellyfish that also lives in Galway Bay, reproduces in a similar way to humans but does so far more flexibly. (2020-02-21)

Stinging water mystery solved: Jellyfish can sting swimmers, prey with 'mucus grenades'
In warm coastal waters around the world, swimmers can often spot large groups of jellyfish pulsing on the seafloor. It is best to avoid areas that upside-down jellyfish inhabit: getting close can lead to irritating stings, even without contact. Researchers have taken a close look at the cause of this mysterious 'stinging water.' Now, a team of scientists reports in Nature Communications Biology on the culprit -- a toxin-filled mucus the jellyfish release into the water. (2020-02-13)

How moon jellyfish get about
With their translucent bells, moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) move around the oceans in a very efficient way. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now used a mathematical model to investigate how these cnidarians manage to use their neural networks to control their locomotion even when they are injured. The results may also contribute to the optimization of underwater robots. The study has already been published online in the journal eLife. (2020-01-23)

Tiny, but effective
Barely visible to the naked eye, gelatinous zooplankton is an important part of the marine ecosystem. In addition, the small organisms also transport large quantities of carbon into deeper layers of the ocean, thus making an important contribution to marine carbon transport. This is underpinned by new studies by an international team of researchers recently published in the renowned journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles. (2020-01-08)

Scientists find way to supercharge protein production
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have found a way to increase production of proteins in bacteria up to a thousandfold, a discovery that could aid production of proteins used in the medical, food, agriculture, chemical and other industries. (2019-12-18)

Jellyfish's 'superpowers' gained through cellular mechanism
Jellyfish are animals that possess the unique ability to regenerate body parts. A team of Japanese scientists has now revealed the cellular mechanisms that give jellyfish these remarkable 'superpowers.' (2019-10-01)

Renegade genes caught red handed
Potentially dangerous genes embedded within human DNA were once thought to be locked down by helpful DNA structures called heterochromatin. A University of Arizona researcher disputes that belief and hopes to change the paradigm even further. (2019-09-16)

Unique report details dermatological progression and effective treatment of a severe jellyfish sting
A detailed case report and comprehensive sequence of photographs in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, published by Elsevier, document the dermatological progression of a patient stung by a jellyfish off the coast of Cambodia. The aim of this report is to guide clinicians and patients to understand what to expect after such a sting and steps to increase the probability of a full recovery. (2019-09-05)

A gentle grip on gelatinous creatures
Jellyfish are about 95% water, which makes them very difficult to study because most of the underwater tools available to marine biologists are clunky, heavy, and often shred jellyfish and other delicate creatures to pieces. A new ultra-soft gripper developed by the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and collaborators at Baruch College uses fettuccini-like 'fingers' inflated with water to gently grasp jellyfish and release them without harm, allowing scientists to safely interact with them in their own habitat. (2019-08-28)

Older adults more likely to condemn even accidental harm
As people get older, they are more likely to condemn and want to punish others for acts that cause harm, even if no harm was intended, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. (2019-08-09)

Green turtles eat plastic that looks like their food
Green turtles are more likely to swallow plastic that resembles their natural diet of sea grass, new research suggests. (2019-08-09)

A novel robotic jellyfish able to perform 3D jet propulsion and maneuvers
Jellyfishes in nature use jet propulsion to move through the water, which have been proven to be one of the most energetically efficient swimmers on the planet. Therefore, the movements of jellyfish have attracted significant interest over the past decade in the context of bioinspired underwater vehicle. Now researchers in Beijing have developed a novel robotic jellyfish able to perform vertical and horizontal jellyfish-like propulsion and maneuvers. (2019-08-05)

Mapping cells in the 'immortal' regenerating hydra
The tiny hydra, a freshwater invertebrate related to jellyfish and corals, has an amazing ability to renew its cells and regenerate damaged tissue. Cut a hydra in half, and it will regenerate its body and nervous system in a couple of days. Researchers at UC Davis have now traced the fate of hydra's cells, revealing how three lines of stem cells become nerves, muscles or other tissues. (2019-07-25)

Black hole brings down curtain on jellyfish galaxy's star turn
The role of an excited black hole in the death of an exotic 'jellyfish' galaxy will be presented today (July 3) by Callum Bellhouse of the University of Birmingham at the RAS National Astronomy Meeting in Lancaster. The supermassive black hole at the center of jellyfish galaxy JO201 is stripping away gas and throwing it out into space, accelerating suppression of star formation and effectively 'killing' the galaxy.  (2019-07-02)

Genomic warning flag just in time for beach season: Jellyfish toxins
An article published today in the Open Access journal GigaScience might make you squirm if you plan to hit the beach. This article presents the draft genomes of three jellyfish species, which have a range of physical traits and level of toxicity. Jellyfish kill more people than sharks, stingrays, and sea snakes combined; thus, having sequences and their analyses available provides an essential resource for future investigation of toxin gene evolution and body shape differences. (2019-06-30)

Deceptively simple: Minute marine animals live in a sophisticated symbiosis with bacteria
Trichoplax, one of the simplest animals on Earth, lives in a highly specific and intimate symbiosis with two types of bacteria. One, Grellia, is related to parasitic bacteria that cause typhus and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. However, it does not appear to harm Trichoplax. The other, Ruthmannia, sits inside the cells Trichoplax uses to digest its food. This symbiosis provides a window into microbial dark matter. The study is published in Nature Microbiology. (2019-06-10)

Rare fossils provide more detailed picture of biodiversity during Middle Ordovician
Marine fossil specimens unearthed in northern Portugal are filling a gap in understanding evolution during the Middle Ordovician period. (2019-06-04)

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