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Current Journalism News and Events

Current Journalism News and Events, Journalism News Articles.
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Fair justice systems need open data access
Northwestern University researchers are developing an A.I. platform that provides users with access to the information and insights hidden inside federal court records, regardless of their data and analytic skills. (2020-07-09)
Study: 'Anti-vaxxers' gain traction against HPV vaccine on Facebook
One of the biggest social media sites -- Facebook -- has allowed ''anti-vaxxers'' to gain a stronger voice against the use of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccine, according to a new study from a media expert at the University of Missouri. (2020-07-08)
Examining media coverage of protests worldwide
As anti-racism solidarity protests continue around the world, new research suggests mainstream media have a tendency to focus on the violence and spectacle of a protest rather than the substance. (2020-06-24)
'Game changer' for reporters: 2016 US presidential election coverage
The 2016 US presidential election is considered a 'game changer' for journalists covering the US presidential elections by causing them to dramatically reconsider how they view their role -- either as neutral disseminators of information or impassioned advocates for the truth -- according to researchers at the University of Missouri's School of Journalism. (2020-06-22)
Police stop fewer black drivers at night when a 'veil of darkness' obscures their race
After analyzing 95 million traffic stop records, filed by officers with 21 state patrol agencies and 35 municipal police forces from 2011 to 2018, a Stanford-led research team concluded that 'police stops and search decisions suffer from persistent racial bias.' (2020-05-06)
Views on guns and death penalty are linked to harsh treatment of immigrants
An online study that pulled equally from people who identify as Democrats or Republicans has found subtle new clues that underlie the dehumanization of immigrants. (2020-04-22)
Journalism is an 'attack surface' for those who spread misinformation
For all the benefits in the expansion of the media landscape, we're still struggling with the spread of misinformation -- and the damage is especially worrisome when it comes to information about science and health. (2020-02-15)
Role-playing game increases empathy for immigrants, study shows
In a study, college students created a fictional online persona from a randomly assigned country and attempted to navigate the administrative hurdles of obtaining a green card and citizenship. (2020-01-30)
Climate change NGOs from rich countries dominate online conversation, study shows
Mass communication professors at the University of Kansas analyzed a year of Twitter activity from nearly 500 climate change NGOs from 79 countries and found those from rich nations were most engaged and had the biggest audience, leaving others at risk of not having their message heard and being left out of the global movement. (2020-01-15)
Research offers new way to assess an organization's public relations
Communication and marketing experts place great weight on an organization's relationship with its public stakeholders, and a new tool allows organizations to better measure and describe the nature of these relationships. (2020-01-03)
Platforms can't settle on 'appropriate' engagement-boosting practices
Researchers at Rutgers University say more consistent standards are needed for advertisers, journalists, influencers and marketers seeking to boost their visibility on platforms such as Google, Facebook and Instagram. (2019-11-18)
Cynical social media voices can erode trust in news media
Amid rising concerns about low public trust in mainstream media institutions, a Rutgers study found that real-life and online social interactions can strongly influence a person's trust in newspaper, TV and online journalism -- but when it comes to online interactions, cynical views are the most influential. (2019-11-04)
In media coverage of climate change, where are the facts?
The New York Times stands out for its coverage of the environment and climate change. (2019-09-19)
'Fake news,' diminishing media trust and the role of social media
Exploring the perception of the 'fake news' phenomenon is critical to combating the ongoing global erosion of trust in the media according to a study co-authored by a University of Houston researcher. (2019-08-01)
Too much screen time for the kids? Grandparents may also be complicit
A new study by Rutgers and other researchers finds that today's grandparents are still true to their traditional fun-loving image -- allowing their grandchildren, while under their supervision, to spend about half of their time on a mobile phone, tablet, computer or TV. (2019-07-08)
What journalism professors are teaching students -- about their futures
A new study from Rice University and Rutgers University finds educators are encouraging aspiring journalists to look for work outside the news business. (2019-06-27)
More than victims: Migration images provide a chance to tell a greater story
Keith Greenwood, an associate professor in the Missouri School of Journalism, has found that a majority of photos depicting the 2015 Syrian refugee crisis portrayed the refugees as victims. (2019-05-29)
US journalism has become more subjective
US-based journalism has gradually shifted away from objective news and offers more opinion-based content that appeals to emotion and relies heavily on argumentation and advocacy, according to a new RAND Corporation report. (2019-05-14)
A study analyzes the academic repercussions of institutional scientific dissemination
Communicating research results to the public generates a range of positive effects on the careers of university professors, according to a study carried out by researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad de Valencia (UV), which analyzed the perception of university researchers who have participated in institutional communication campaigns. (2019-05-07)
Television programming for children reveals systematic gender inequality
Programming children watch on American TV shows systematic gender inequality, according to new research. (2019-04-30)
Can science writing be automated?
A neural network developed at MIT and elsewhere can ''read'' scientific research papers and generate plain-English summaries of their contents. (2019-04-18)
The whisper room: Moderates on Twitter are losing their voice
MU researcher finds that partisan users form highly partisan social networks on Twitter, moderate users -- or those less politically engaged -- continue to avoid politics, potentially creating an important void on social media. (2019-04-03)
Study: With Twitter, race of the messenger matters
University of Kansas journalism researchers showed real tweets about the NFL anthem protests to a group of millennials. (2019-02-22)
Facebook memes during 2016 presidential election differ from gender stereotypes
Facebook political memes of Donald Trump in the 2016 election were more likely to focus on his hairstyle and facial expressions, while those of Hillary Clinton were more likely to center on the email scandal and her relationships -- a contrast to historical gender stereotypes in politics, a Baylor University study has found. (2019-01-28)
A new study shows that wine experts differ by geographic region
Canadian vintners, sommeliers, journalists and other wine experts judge and rate wines differently depending on where in the country they are located. (2019-01-14)
Foundation funding changes international reporting
Funding by private foundations is inadvertently changing the international journalism it supports, according to a new study led by the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2019-01-10)
Study suggests that fear and anger had different effects on conservatives and liberals
The emotional underpinnings of political ideology motivated how the electorate sought and processed information about the 2016 presidential election and the major issue of climate change. (2019-01-09)
India's right to information act provides lessons on government transparency
Journalists are often assumed to be the biggest utilizers of freedom-of-information legislation, but new UA-led research found that collaborations between journalists, social activists and civil-society organizations were essential to the success of creating a right-to-information agenda in India. (2018-12-17)
Journalists can restore media trust
In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers discovered journalists can increase media trust by speaking out in defense of their profession, while also doing more fact checking. (2018-12-10)
Journalism study evaluates emotions on the job
A study investigating the emotional labor involved in reporting traumatic news events finds key differences between how male and female journalists cope. (2018-10-22)
Public opinion on GMOs might impact similar technologies in stores
Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that an individual's perception of genetically modified organisms might impact their judgments about whether or not nanotechnology-enabled products should be labeled in stores. (2018-10-16)
'Blurred face' news anonymity gets an artificial intelligence spin
Researchers in Simon Fraser University's School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT) have devised a way to replace the use of 'blurring' faces in news reports when anonymity is needed. (2018-08-01)
Study: Journalists view co-workers as more ethical than peers
The University of Texas at Dallas' Dr. Angela Lee explored journalists' opinions about one another -- both their co-workers and their peers. (2018-07-13)
What's trending in fake news? IU tool show what stories go viral, and if bots are to blame
Researchers at the Indiana University Observatory on Social Media have launched upgrades to two tools playing a major role in the fight against the spread of misinformation online. (2018-05-17)
Understanding veteran privacy rules could help improve counseling strategies
Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has found that veterans tend to disclose wartime information on a strict need-to-know basis, and that therapists treating veterans can improve their counseling strategies if they seek to understand veteran privacy rules that are formed by military culture. (2018-05-16)
Mainstream media coverage of humanitarian crises falls short, new survey finds
Mainstream media coverage of humanitarian crises is 'selective, sporadic, simplistic and partial', according to a new consumer survey. (2018-05-01)
Ebola media coverage impacted how the public perceived the disease and survivors
Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that news coverage of Ebola during the time it was in the US focused on telling individual stories to humanize those affected. (2018-04-18)
More Americans aware of growing problem of opioid addiction
A new survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research reveals the number of Americans who see opioid addiction as a significant issue for their community today is up significantly over just two years ago. (2018-04-05)
Professor makes legal case for schools to challenge cyberbullies
Student bullying on the internet could be headed for a showdown with a 50-year-old U.S. (2018-04-03)
Social media does not decrease face-to-face interactions, MU study finds
Now, researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Kansas have found that social media use has no significant negative effect on social interactions or social well-being. (2018-03-01)
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