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Review: Consequences of systemic racism in urban environments
Even as studies have shown that the uneven distribution of urban heat islands, urban tree canopy cover, and urban environmental hazards, for example, are strongly dictated by structural racism and classism in cities, relatively few studies have addressed the varied contributions of social factors like race to ecological heterogeneity in cities. (2020-08-13)
Large-scale COVID-19 vaccine production will require knowledge transfer on manufacturing
Massive, rapid production of vaccines to fight COVID-19 will require firms to share know-how not just about what to make, but how to make it, write Nicholson Price and colleagues in this Policy Forum. (2020-08-13)
Coastal flooding study finds trust-building, power-sharing key for environmental justice
It took two years and $11 million, but eventually ranchers, politicians and scientists came to a consensus about how to prevent flooding in Tillamook, a coastal Oregon town. (2020-08-12)
Dignity and respect go a long way in county jail, new research shows
A University of Wisconsin Oshkosh study indicates a little respect and decency can go a long way in improving some aspects of America's criminal justice system. (2020-08-12)
Study: Increased presence of law enforcement officers in schools does not improve safety
A new longitudinal study sought to learn more about the impact of school resource officers (SROs). (2020-08-10)
Save black lives
The Center for Justice Research at Texas Southern University and the Black Public Defender Association today released ''Save Black Lives: A Call for Racially-responsive Strategies and Resources for the Black Community during the COVID-19 Pandemic,'' a comprehensive report that details why public health responses and strategies to address COVID-19 must be centered around race and the criminal legal system. (2020-08-05)
Despite decline, distribution of air pollution highlights socioeconomic disparities
While the level of fine particulate air pollution has declined considerably over the last several decades, a new study finds that its distribution has remained largely unchanged. (2020-07-30)
Anti-Asian racism during COVID-19 has historical ties in United States
Anti-Asian hate crimes during health crises are unfortunately not new, according to a new academic paper examining the history of this phenomenon. (2020-07-29)
Study of US mass shootings, firearms homicides suggests two-pronged policy approach
A new study examined the impact of household gun ownership and concealed carry legislation on annual counts of mass shootings and homicides from firearms in the United States over the last 25 years. (2020-07-23)
Scientists at USC and other institutions develop new method to improve police lineups
For the first time, scientists have developed a way to measure the reliability of an eyewitness trying to pick a culprit from a police lineup. (2020-07-14)
Study calls for action to protect BAME and migrant groups from economic impact of COVID-19
The COVID-19 lockdown has had a disproportionate economic impact on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) migrants in the UK, new research, which also calls for racial justice, reveals today. (2020-07-13)
Fair justice systems need open data access
Northwestern University researchers are developing an A.I. platform that provides users with access to the information and insights hidden inside federal court records, regardless of their data and analytic skills. (2020-07-09)
Community and law enforcement partnerships best help kids who witness home violence
The Child Trauma Response Team, an innovative police and community-based organization partnership, demonstrated success at screening and treating children for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately following incidents of intimate partner violence, according to a Rutgers-led study published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. (2020-07-08)
Does genomics perpetuate inequality?
A new Hastings Center special report takes a critical look at the role of genomics in perpetuating racism and inequality. (2020-07-08)
Linking hospital and other records can predict both fatal and nonfatal opioid overdoses, study suggests
A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that the odds of a fatal opioid overdose were 1.5 times higher for individuals with one to two visits to the emergency department for any medical issue than for people with no hospital visits. (2020-06-24)
Examining media coverage of protests worldwide
As anti-racism solidarity protests continue around the world, new research suggests mainstream media have a tendency to focus on the violence and spectacle of a protest rather than the substance. (2020-06-24)
Marching for change: 2017 Women's March met with mostly positive support online
New Penn State research found that the 2017 Women's March, which championed goals in support of women and human rights, was met with mostly positive support on social media, with relatively few negative messages. (2020-06-23)
Helping to protect the most illegally trafficked mammals in the world
As China upgrades pangolins to the highest protected status level, an alternative approach to using long standing forensic methods is helping wildlife crime investigators disrupt poachers and animal traffickers in an effort to bring them to justice. (2020-06-22)
Classes set by ability are hitting children's self-confidence, study finds
The way a vast amount of schools are setup, with classes grouping children based on their ability, is severely affecting pupil's self-confidence. (2020-06-16)
COVID-19: Impact on environmental justice
COVID-19 is like a heat-seeking missile that targets the most vulnerable. (2020-06-16)
COVID-19 pandemic could decimate outdoor environmental, science education programs
A survey of 1,000 outdoor education programs nationwide finds that nearly two-thirds are in danger of folding because of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-06-15)
Addressing the drug problem in health and social care will produce better outcomes
Researchers at the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) have evaluated the impact of decriminalization policy in different settings. (2020-06-12)
COVID-19 triage decisions should 'ignore life-years saved,' writes bioethicist in Medical Care
How do we decide which patients with COVID-19 should get priority for lifesaving ventilators and ICU beds? (2020-06-11)
Place doesn't trump race as predictor of incarceration
Steven Alvarado is the author of 'The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,' published June 1 in the journal Socius showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn't diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos. (2020-06-11)
AI sentencing tools need to be closely scrutinised, says new study
Judges should closely vet the AI tools they use to help them predict whether a defendant is likely to re offend, urges a new study. (2020-06-09)
Cannabis in Michigan: New report documents trends before recreational legalization
Nearly twelve years ago, Michigan voters approved the use of medical cannabis by residents with certain health conditions. (2020-06-04)
Environmental justice defenders victims of violence and murder
Grassroots movements halt environmental degradation in up to 27% of environmental conflicts worldwide, according to a study by the ICTA-UAB. (2020-06-02)
Environmental groups moving beyond conservation
Although non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have become powerful voices in world environmental politics, little is known of the global picture of this sector. (2020-05-28)
Women in criminal justice system less likely to receive treatment for opioid use
Pregnant women involved in the criminal justice system are disproportionately not receiving medications for opioid use disorder, as compared to their peers, according to a Vanderbilt-led study published today in PLOS Medicine. (2020-05-19)
How do police view legalized cannabis? In Washington state, officers raise concerns
A new study evaluated the effects of legalizing cannabis on police officers' law enforcement efforts in Washington. (2020-05-07)
Innovative drunk driving program lowers risk of rearrest
Law enforcement and drug treatment officials struggle to break the cycle of people who are repeatedly arrested for drunk driving and related offences. (2020-05-05)
Research examines the impact of new technology used in video court hearings
A new academic evaluation of video-enabled justice published today (Monday 4 May) offers insights for courts, court users and others at a time when the Covid-19 pandemic looks set to necessitate a rapid increase in the use of technology to ensure the timely administration of justice. (2020-05-04)
Alternate light 5 times more effective in detecting bruises on victims of color
As a consequence of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, rates of domestic abuse have increased. (2020-04-30)
COVID-19 could spell the end of an egalitarian National Health Service
A return to the principles of equality and universality of care that informed the NHS 70 years ago could be impossible. (2020-04-27)
New study shows sharp decrease of intimate partner violence in Nicaragua
The percentage of women and girls in Nicaragua's second-largest city who reported experiencing physical violence by their partners during their lifetimes decreased from 55% in 1995 to 28% in 2016, according to a new study published in the journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-04-21)
Protecting yourself from the latest internet sex crime
Researchers from Michigan State University released a study on 'sextortion' -- a lesser-known internet crime that poses a threat to adults and minors -- that sheds light on the importance of protecting the public from online criminals. (2020-04-21)
Police training reduced complaints and use of force against civilians
A Northwestern University evaluation of a procedural justice training program involving more than 8,000 Chicago Police Department (CPD) officers shows it reduced complaints filed against police by approximately 10%. (2020-04-20)
Centring sexual and reproductive health and justice in the global COVID-19 response
The Lancet commentary 'Centring sexual and reproductive health and justice in the global COVID-19 response' highlights the detrimental impact of the global COVID-19 pandemic response on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). (2020-04-09)
Household chemical use linked to child language delays
Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found. (2020-03-04)
Medication treatments led to 80% lower risk of fatal overdose for patients with opioid use disorder
Patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) receiving treatment with opioid agonists (medications such as methadone or buprenorphine) had an 80 percent lower risk of dying from an opioid overdose compared to patients in treatment without the use of medications. (2020-02-25)
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