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Current Landscape News and Events

Current Landscape News and Events, Landscape News Articles.
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UNH researchers find climate change increases risk of mercury contamination
As global temperatures continue to rise, the thawing of permafrost is accelerated and mercury trapped in the frozen ground is now being released. (2019-10-16)
Empty spaces, how do they make a protein unstable?
Partial unfolding of proteins can be a major challenge in the industry, as it may affect the stability of products. (2019-10-14)
Aerial photographs shed light on Mont Blanc ice loss
Photographs taken in the exact same spot 100 years apart show the impact of climate change on the Mont Blanc massif. (2019-10-10)
Cretan tomb's location may have strengthened territorial claim
Examining the position occupied by tombs in their landscape in Prepalatial Crete gives us new insights into the role played by burial sites, mortuary practices and the deceased in the living society. (2019-10-09)
Climate change could pit species against one another as they shift ranges
Species have few good options when it comes to surviving climate change--they can genetically adapt to new conditions, shift their ranges, or both. (2019-09-30)
Landscape patterns matter
The size, shape, and arrangement of fields, forests, wetlands, and human populations, and the ways these and other features interact and change across landscapes, have a multitude of implications for resource sustainability, ecosystem health, habitat connectivity, and other societal values. (2019-09-27)
Mice, like humans, fidget when deep in thought
By measuring the brain activity of mice during decision making, neuroscientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory observed that like humans, mice also seemed to fidget, or make uninstructed movements unrelated to the trained task. (2019-09-24)
Researchers see need for action on forest fire risk
How do humans affect forest fires? An international team of researchers has now shown for a region in north-eastern Poland that forest fires increasingly occurred there after the end of the 18th century with the change to organised forestry. (2019-09-17)
Special journal issue brings focus to importance of studying landscape pattern
A new special issue of the journal Landscape Ecology organized by scientists at the USDA Forest Service and North Carolina State University assesses the state of the science of landscape pattern analysis. (2019-09-17)
'Planting water' is possible -- against aridity and droughts
Together with scientists from the UK and the US, researchers from the Leibniz- Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have developed a mathematical model that can reflect the complex interplays between vegetation, soil and water regimes. (2019-09-11)
People can see beauty in complex mathematics, study shows
Ordinary people see beauty in complex mathematical arguments in the same way they can appreciate a beautiful landscape painting or a piano sonata. (2019-09-05)
Land-use program fosters white-tailed deer populations in USA
A land-use program piloted in the United States is having a long-term positive impact on populations of white-tailed deer, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-08-27)
New study: Migrating mule deer don't need directions
Mule deer navigate in spring and fall mostly by using their knowledge of past migration routes and seasonal ranges. (2019-08-23)
African elephants demonstrate movements that vary in response to ecological change
Wild African elephants show markedly different movements and reactions to the same risks and resources, according to a new study from Colorado State University and Save the Elephants. (2019-08-20)
A Stone Age boat building site has been discovered underwater
The Maritime Archaeological Trust has discovered a new 8,000 year old structure 11 metres below sea level on the Isle of Wight. (2019-08-20)
Connected forest networks on oil palm plantations key to protecting endangered species
Set-aside patches of high-quality forest on palm oil plantations may help protect species like orangutans, as well as various species of insects, birds and bats -- many of which are threatened with extinction in areas of Indonesia and Malaysia, where 85% of the world's palm oil is produced. (2019-08-20)
Moffitt Researchers complete largest genomic analysis of Merkel cell carcinoma patients
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have developed the largest descriptive genomic analysis of MCC patients to date, in collaboration with Foundation Medicine and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. (2019-08-20)
Interregional differences in somatic genetic landscape diversify prognosis in glioblastoma
Interregional differences in somatic genetic landscape diversify prognosis in glioblastoma. (2019-08-19)
Mapping the energetic landscape of solar cells
A new spectroscopic method now makes it possible to measure and visualize the energetic landscape inside solar cells based on organic materials. (2019-08-13)
Jurassic world of volcanoes found in central Australia
An international team of subsurface explorers from the University of Adelaide in Australia and the University of Aberdeen in Scotland have uncovered a previously undescribed 'Jurassic World' of around 100 ancient volcanoes buried deep within the Cooper-Eromanga Basins of central Australia. (2019-08-12)
Study shows we like our math like we like our art: Beautiful
A beautiful landscape painting, a beautiful piano sonata -- art and music are almost exclusively described in terms of aesthetics, but what about math? (2019-08-09)
Forest fragments surprising havens for wildlife
Researchers conducted camera trap surveys within Sumatra's Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park and five surrounding remnant forest fragments, finding 28 mammal species in the protected forest and 21 in the fragments -- including critically endangered species such as Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) and Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), along with species of conservation concern such as marbled cat (Pardofelis marmorata) and Asiatic golden cat (Pardofelis temminckii). (2019-08-08)
Long-lasting effects of ironwork on mammal distributions over the last millennium
Pre-modern energy-intensive industries have had long-lasting impacts on macro-ecological patterns. (2019-08-05)
Study finds native bighorn sheep herds retain migratory diversity
A study led by Blake Lowrey found notable distinctions in the migrations of different types of bighorn sheep herds. (2019-08-02)
Walkability is key: A look at greenspace use
New University of Arizona research suggests the key to getting more people to use public greenspaces may be making access to them easier and safer. (2019-07-31)
Predators' fear of humans ripples through wildlife communities, emboldening rodents
Giving credence to the saying, 'While the cat's away, the mice will play,' a new study indicates that pumas and medium-sized carnivores lie low when they sense the presence of humans, which frees up the landscape for rodents to forage more brazenly. (2019-07-17)
Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics
Two physics research groups at the University of Kansas have generated free electrons from organic semiconductors when combined with a single atomic layer of molybdenum disulfide, a recently discovered two-dimensional semiconductor. (2019-07-16)
Effectiveness of using natural enemies to combat pests depends on surroundings
A new study of cabbage crops in New York -- a state industry worth close to $60 million in 2017, according to the USDA -- reports for the first time that the effectiveness of releasing natural enemies to combat pests depends on the landscape surrounding the field. (2019-07-15)
Millet farmers adopted barley agriculture and permanently settled the Tibetan Plateau
The permanent human occupation on the Tibetan Plateau was facilitated by the introduction of cold-tolerant barley around 3600 years before present, however, how barley agriculture spread onto the Tibetan Plateau remains unknown. (2019-07-02)
Can mathematics help us understand the complexity of our microbiome?
In humans, the gut microbiome is an ecosystem of hundreds to thousands of microbial species living within the gastrointestinal tract, influencing health and even longevity. (2019-07-02)
Frontline heroes hailed in the war against devil cancers
Residents of Tasmania's D'Entrecasteaux Channel Peninsula, Kingborough and Huon Valley communities are being hailed as the frontline heroes in the war against two deadly transmissible cancers affecting Tasmanian devils -- Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD) and Devil Facial Tumor 2 (DFT2). (2019-06-26)
Neanderthals made repeated use of the ancient settlement of 'Ein Qashish, Israel
The archaeological site of 'Ein Qashish in northern Israel was a place of repeated Neanderthal occupation and use during the Middle Paleolithic, according to a study released June 26, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ravid Ekshtain of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and colleagues. (2019-06-26)
New hypothesis links habitat loss and the global emergence of infectious diseases
Auburn University researchers have published a new hypothesis that could provide the foundation for new scientific studies looking into the association of habitat loss and the global emergence of infectious diseases. (2019-06-24)
South African forests show pathways to a sustainable future
Native forests make up 1percent of the landscape in South Africa but could play a key role in reducing atmospheric carbon and identifying sustainable development practices that can be used globally to counter climate change, according to a Penn State researcher. (2019-06-19)
Overlooked: How pumping groundwater impacts streams and vegetation
Pumping groundwater for uses like irrigation has decreased streamflow and plant water availability in the United States, according to the first large-scale simulation of surface water systems' sensitivity to water changes below ground. (2019-06-19)
River sediment speaks to changing climate
Studying the sediment of a mountain river can reveal thousands of years or more of a waterway's history, including new threats from more frequent wildfires and increased precipitation brought by climate change. (2019-06-11)
Widespread permafrost degradation seen in high Arctic terrain
Rapid changes in terrain are taking place in Canada's high Arctic polar deserts due to increases in summer air temperatures. (2019-05-23)
Using fruit flies to identify new treatment for a colorectal cancer patient
Erdem Bangi and colleagues demonstrate a new approach to developing personalized therapy for a patient with treatment-resistant colorectal cancer: using a fruit fly genetically modified with a patient's own cancer mutations to test candidate treatments. (2019-05-22)
River valleys helped shape current genetic landscape of Han Chinese
The Han Chinese are the world's largest ethnic group, making up 91.6% of modern-day China. (2019-05-21)
Can a hands-on model help forest stakeholders fight tree disease?
An aggressive new strain of sudden oak death, a disease that's killed millions of trees, has turned up in Oregon, posing a threat to timber production. (2019-05-19)
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