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Current Landscape News and Events, Landscape News Articles.
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Caves tell us that Australia's mountains are still growing
Research shows Buchan Caves to be about 3.5 million years old and that Victoria's East Gippsland has remained tectonically active for long times, even into the present-day, which is why residents occasionally report earthquakes. (2020-05-20)
Genetic tradeoffs do not stop evolution of antibiotic resistance
Bacteria can still develop antibiotic resistance even in the face of challenging genetic tradeoffs, or compromises, associated with varying antibiotic concentrations, says a new study published today in eLife. (2020-05-19)
Study examines impact of Chicago River reversal on region's aquatic environments, fauna
In a paper published in the journal Urban Ecosystems, University of Illinois at Chicago students from the departments of earth and environmental sciences and biological sciences have measured both the extent of wetland loss in Cook County since the time of the river reversal and the alterations in the animal populations. (2020-05-18)
Early humans thrived in this drowned South African landscape
An interdisciplinary, international team of scientists has reconstructed the paleoecology the Paleo-Agulhas Plain, a now-drowned landscape on the southern tip of Africa that was high and dry during glacial phases of the last 2 million years and may have been instrumental in shaping the evolution of early modern humans. (2020-05-15)
Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health. (2020-05-14)
Saving livestock by thinking like a predator
Humans have struggled to reduce the loss of livestock to carnivores for thousands of years, and yet, solutions remain elusive. (2020-05-14)
Water loss in northern peatlands threatens to intensify fires, global warming
A group of 59 international scientists, led by researchers at Canada's McMaster University, has uncovered new information about the distinct effects of climate change on boreal forests and peatlands, which threaten to worsen wildfires and accelerate global warming. (2020-05-11)
Computational techniques explore 'the dark side of amyloid aggregation in the brain'
As physicians and families know too well, though Alzheimer's disease has been intensely studied for decades, too much is still not known about molecular processes in the brain that cause it. (2020-04-29)
Dramatic loss of food plants for insects
Just a few weeks ago, everyone was talking about plummeting insect numbers. (2020-04-24)
Identifying land cover from outer space
Having detailed land cover information is important for a better understanding of our environment. (2020-04-20)
Ash dieback is less severe in isolated ash trees
New research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Ecology finds that ash dieback is far less severe in the isolated conditions ash is often found in, such as forests with low ash density or in open canopies like hedges, suggesting the long term impact of the disease on Europe's ash trees will be more limited than previously thought. (2020-04-16)
Earth Day alert to save our frogs
With climate action a theme of Earth Day 2020 (April 22, 2020), a new research paper highlights the plight of some of the most at-risk amphibian species - and shortfalls in most conservation efforts. (2020-04-16)
Earliest humans in the Amazon created thousands of 'forest islands' as they tamed wild plants
The earliest human inhabitants of the Amazon created thousands of artificial forest islands as they tamed wild plants to grow food, a new study shows. (2020-04-08)
Stanford researchers show how forest loss leads to spread of disease
In Uganda, loss of forested habitat increases the likelihood of interactions between disease-carrying wild primates and humans. (2020-04-07)
The four horsemen of the COVID-19 pandemic
It is clear that we must prioritize identifying and alleviating the conditions that made the Covid-19 pandemic possible. (2020-04-06)
Vermont has conserved one third of the land needed for an ecologically functional future
In a new study, forest conservation experts at the University of Vermont (UVM) confirmed that the state has already protected 33%, or 1.3 million acres, of highest priority targeted lands needed to protect and connect valuable wildlife habitats and corridors. (2020-04-01)
Study offers new insight into the impact of ancient migrations on the European landscape
Scientists from the University of Plymouth and the University of Copenhagen led research tracing how the two major human migrations recorded in Holocene Europe -- the northwestward movement of Anatolian farmer populations during the Neolithic and the westward movement of Yamnaya steppe peoples during the Bronze Age -- unfolded. (2020-04-01)
Late cretaceous dinosaur-dominated ecosystem
A topic of considerable interest to paleontologists is how dinosaur-dominated ecosystems were structured, how dinosaurs and co-occurring animals were distributed across the landscape, how they interacted with one another, and how these systems compared to ecosystems today. (2020-03-18)
UM professor helps Malaysia develop conservation areas, protect species
Jedediah Brodie has spent a career tromping around tropical rainforests, conducting on-the-ground research in some of the world's most lush and diverse regions. (2020-03-13)
Human activity affects interactions between plants and seed-dispersing birds
Analysis of Atlantic Rainforest fragments shows how extinction of animal species, habitat loss and forest fragmentation affect networks of ecological interactions. (2020-03-13)
Melting glaciers will challenge some salmon populations and benefit others
A new Simon Fraser University-led study looking at the effects that glacier retreat will have on western North American Pacific salmon predicts that while some salmon populations may struggle, others may benefit. (2020-03-11)
Amazon rainforest could be gone within a lifetime
Writing in Nature Communications, researchers from Bangor University, Southampton University and The School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London, reveal the speed at which ecosystems of different sizes will disappear, once they have reached a point beyond which they collapse -- transforming into an alternative ecosystem. (2020-03-10)
FSU researchers find newly uncovered Arctic landscape plays important role in carbon cycle
As the ice sheet covering most of Greenland retreats, Florida State University researchers are studying the newly revealed landscape to understand its role in the carbon cycle. (2020-03-05)
Thinning, prescribed burns protected forests during the massive Carlton Complex wildfire
In the first major study following the devastating 2014 Carlton Complex fire in north central Washington, researchers from the University of Washington and US Forest Service found that previous tree thinning and prescribed burns helped forests survive the fire. (2020-02-27)
Diversifying traditional forest management to protect forest arthropods
The structure of vegetation and steam distance are important factors to consider in order to protect the biodiversity of forest arthropods, as stated in an article now published in the journal Forest Ecology and Management. (2020-02-20)
SR-FACT microscopy reveals the landscape of the cellular organelle interactome
We developed super-resolution fluorescence-assisted diffraction computational tomography(SR-FACT), which combines three-dimensional optical diffraction tomography with two-dimensional fluorescence Hessian structured illumination microscopy. (2020-02-17)
To help wildlife move, researchers map both natural and legal boundaries
Researchers have developed a way to find the path of least resistance in creating wildlife corridors by mapping not only habitat but also the types of legal authority governing the landscape. (2020-02-14)
Silica increases water availability for plants
As a result of climate change, more frequent and longer drought periods are predicted in the future. (2020-02-12)
Quantum fluctuations sustain the record superconductor
Calculations performed by an international team of researchers from Spain, Italy, France, Germany, and Japan show that the crystal structure of the record superconducting LaH10 compound is stabilized by atomic quantum fluctuations. (2020-02-10)
Enjoying the View? How computer games can help evaluate landscapes
Geographers from Staffordshire University are stepping into the virtual world of computer games to develop exciting new ways of assessing landscapes.Ruth Swetnam, Professor of Applied Geography, has spent years analysing geographical landscapes and determining what features people from different countries find most appealing. (2020-02-06)
Landscape-level surveys are necessary to address large-scale wildlife losses from poaching
Widespread poaching in tropical biodiversity hotspots is causing unprecedented declines in wildlife populations, known as defaunation. (2020-02-05)
Sediment loading key to predicting post-wildfire debris flows
The mudslides that follow wildfires in Southern California can be deadly and difficult to predict. (2020-02-05)
Arctic permafrost thaw plays greater role in climate change than previously estimated
Abrupt thawing of permafrost will double previous estimates of potential carbon emissions from permafrost thaw in the Arctic, and is already rapidly changing the landscape and ecology of the circumpolar north, a new CU Boulder-led study finds. (2020-02-03)
Organic farm advantages in biodiversity and profits depend on location
A large-scale meta-analysis found that organic agriculture sites had 34% more biodiversity and 50% more profits than conventional agriculture sites, even though the organic sites had 18% lower crop yields. (2020-01-27)
A proposal to change environmental risk assessment for pesticides
Despite regulatory frameworks designed to prevent environmental damage, pesticide use is still linked to declines in insects, birds and aquatic species, an outcome that raises questions about the efficacy of current regulatory procedures. (2020-01-23)
Improved functioning of diverse landscape mosaics
It is well-established that biodiverse ecosystems generally function better than monocultures. (2020-01-09)
Evolving landscape added fuel to Gobi Desert's high-speed winds
A new study finds that the dark, rocky landscape of the Hami basin in the Gobi Desert helped to make it one of the windiest places in China. (2020-01-08)
Geographers find tipping point in deforestation
University of Cincinnati geography researchers have identified a tipping point for deforestation that leads to rapid forest loss. (2020-01-07)
Study shows animal life thriving around Fukushima
Nearly a decade after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, researchers from the University of Georgia have found that wildlife populations are abundant in areas void of human life. (2020-01-06)
Berlin's bright sky isn't a bat's thing
People can hardly imagine a city without night-time street lighting. (2019-12-20)
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