Current Landslides News and Events

Current Landslides News and Events, Landslides News Articles.
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New fiber optic sensors transmit data up to 100 times faster
Fiber optic sensors - used in critical applications like detecting fires in tunnels, pinpointing leaks in pipelines and predicting landslides - are about to get even faster and more accurate. (2020-11-16)

Retreating glacier presents landslide threat, tsunami risk in Alaskan fjord
Using NASA satellite imagery and software processing approaches, a group of geoscientists has discovered a landslide-generated tsunami threat in Barry Arm, Alaska, that will likely affect tourists and locals in the surrounding area in the next 20 years. (2020-11-13)

Landslide along Alaskan fjord could trigger tsunami
Scientists noted that the slope on Barry Arm fjord on Prince William Sound in southeastern Alaska slid some 120 meters from 2010 to 2017, a slow-moving landslide caused by glacial melt that could trigger a devastating tsunami. These are some of the first measurements to quantify how the slope is falling there; the study also models a potential tsunami. (2020-11-12)

Post-wildfire hazards: Toward an understanding of when & how slope failure may occur
Across the western US, severe wildfires fueled by tinder-dry vegetation have already burned more than 3.2 million hectares (8 million acres [as of the time of this press release]) -- an area the size of Maryland -- in 2020, and nearly six times that area burned this year in Australia. And even though neither country's worst-ever fire year is not yet over, concerns are already mounting regarding the next hazard these regions will face: dangerous and destructive debris flows. (2020-10-27)

Simple actions can help people survive landslides
Simple actions can dramatically improve a person's chances of surviving a landslide, according to records from 38 landslides in the US and around the world. People who survived landslides tended to show key behaviors such as being aware of the risk, moving to higher ground, and making noise if buried. (2020-10-22)

Scientists improve model of landslide-induced tsunami
MIPT researchers Leopold Lobkovsky and Raissa Mazova, and their young colleagues from Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University have created a model of landslide-induced tsunamis that accounts for the initial location of the landslide body. Reported in Landslides, the model reveals that tsunami height is affected by the coastal slope and the position of the land mass before slipping. The highest and most devastating waves result from onshore landslide masses. (2020-10-19)

AI taught to rapidly assess disaster damage so humans know where help is needed most
Researchers trained an AI to assess post-disaster building damage just by looking at aerial images of the aftermath. (2020-09-30)

Landslides have long-term effects on tundra vegetation
Landslides have long-term effects on tundra vegetation, a new study shows. Conducting the study in North West Siberia, the researchers found that tundra vegetation regenerated rapidly after a major landslide event in 1989. Two decades later, differences in the vegetation of the landslide area and the areas surrounding it have evened out, but even after 30 years, the vegetation of the landslide area is nowhere close to the vegetation of the surrounding areas. (2020-09-28)

Earthquake lightning: Mysterious luminescence phenomena
Photoemission induced by rock fracturing can occur as a result of landslides associated with earthquakes. Factors involved in such earthquake lightnings were studied with granite, rhyolite, pyroclastic rock and limestone. (2020-09-28)

Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes. (2020-09-16)

Fossils reveal diversity of animal life roaming Europe 2 million years ago
A re-analysis of fossils from one of Europe's most significant paleontological sites reveals a wide diversity of animal species, including a large terrestrial monkey, short-necked giraffe, rhinos and saber-toothed cats. These and other species roamed the open grasslands of Eastern Europe approximately 2 million years ago. (2020-08-24)

Photos may improve understanding of volcanic processes
The shape of volcanoes and their craters provide critical information on their formation and eruptive history. Techniques applied to photographs -- photogrammetry -- show promise and utility in correlating shape change to volcanic background and eruption activity. (2020-07-20)

The story behind a uniquely dark, wetland soil
Areas where landslides are common make hydric soil identification tricky. (2020-07-08)

Typhoon changed earthquake patterns
Intensive erosion can temporarily change the earthquake activity (seismicity) of a region significantly. This has now been shown for Taiwan by researchers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in cooperation with international colleagues. They report on this in the journal ''Scientific Reports''. (2020-07-02)

Researchers catch a wave to determine how forces control granular material properties
Stress wave propagation through grainy, or granular, materials is important for detecting the magnitude of earthquakes, locating oil and gas reservoirs, designing acoustic insulation and designing materials for compacting powders. (2020-06-29)

Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan in input-output analysis
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan was examined in IOA. (2020-06-24)

Scientists find key factors impacting sideswiping tropical cyclone precipitation
Scientists find that the distribution of sideswiping tropical cyclones precipitation(STP) includes extreme STP events that appear not only over the island and coastal areas, but also over inland areas (2020-06-15)

Taking a landslide's temperature to avert catastrophe
Duke engineers have developed a comprehensive model of deep-seated landslides and demonstrated that it can accurately recreate the dynamics of historic and current landslides occurring under varying conditions. The model points to the temperature of a thin layer of clay at the base of the landslide as critical to the potential for sudden cataclysmic failure. The approach is currently monitoring a landslide in Andorra and suggests methods for mitigating the risk of its escalation. (2020-06-15)

FSU researcher detects unknown submarine landslides in Gulf of Mexico
A Florida State University researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region. (2020-05-18)

Extreme rainfall days in metropolitan São Paulo have risen four-fold in seven decades
Study by researchers at Brazil's National Disaster Surveillance and Early Warning Center (CEMADEN) also shows a rise in the number of consecutive dry days, suggesting that extreme rainfall events are concentrated in shorter, more widely spaced periods. (2020-04-03)

Researchers develop new explanation for destructive earthquake vibrations
High-frequency vibrations are some of the most damaging ground movements produced by earthquakes, and Brown University researchers have a new theory about how they're produced. (2020-03-03)

Climate change could trigger more landslides in High Mountain Asia
More frequent and intense rainfall events due to climate change could cause more landslides in the High Mountain Asia region of China, Tibet and Nepal, according to the first quantitative study of the link between precipitation and landslides in the region. (2020-02-11)

Sediment loading key to predicting post-wildfire debris flows
The mudslides that follow wildfires in Southern California can be deadly and difficult to predict. New research can help officials identify areas prone to these mudslides and respond before disaster occurs, according to scientists. (2020-02-05)

Arctic permafrost thaw plays greater role in climate change than previously estimated
Abrupt thawing of permafrost will double previous estimates of potential carbon emissions from permafrost thaw in the Arctic, and is already rapidly changing the landscape and ecology of the circumpolar north, a new CU Boulder-led study finds. (2020-02-03)

Martian landslides not conclusive evidence of ice
Giant ridges on the surface of landslides on Mars could have formed without ice, challenging their use by some as unequivocal evidence of past ice on the red planet, finds a new UCL-led study using state-of-the-art satellite data. (2019-10-24)

Ground failure study shows deep landslides not reactivated by 2018 Anchorage Quake
Major landslides triggered by the 1964 magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska earthquake responded to, but were not reactivated by, the magnitude 7.1 Anchorage earthquake that took place 30 November 2018, researchers concluded in a new study published in Seismological Research Letters. (2019-10-23)

NASA's Aqua satellite reveals flooding in Japan from Typhoon Hagibis
Typhoon Hagibis made landfall in Japan over the weekend of October 12 and 13, bringing damaging winds, rough surf and flooding rains. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the flooding caused by the torrential rainfall. (2019-10-15)

Global analysis of submarine canyons may shed light on Martian landscapes
On a map, submarine canyons seem identical to land canyons -- so much so that researchers surmised they are shaped by the same physical laws. New research reveals distinct differences for the first time. (2019-10-09)

Rice irrigation worsened landslides in deadliest earthquake of 2018 finds NTU study
Irrigation significantly exacerbated the earthquake-triggered landslides in Palu, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, in 2018, according to an international study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists. (2019-10-08)

Early warning signals heralded fatal collapse of Krakatau volcano
On 22 December 2018, a flank of the Anak Krakatau plunged into the Sunda strait between the Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Java, triggering a tsunami that killed 430 people. An international research team has now shown that the volcano produced clear warning signals before its collapse. The researchers recommend to use their study to improve monitoring of volcanoes. (2019-10-01)

Researchers uncover role of earthquake motions in triggering a 'surprise' tsunami
In newly published research, an international team of geologists, geophysicists, and mathematicians show how coupled computer models can accurately recreate the conditions leading to the world's deadliest natural disasters of 2018, the Palu earthquake and tsunami, which struck western Sulawesi, Indonesia in September last year. (2019-09-05)

New GSA bulletin study of the 2014 Oso landslide
As a compelling example of a large-mobility landslide, the March 22, 2014 landslide near Oso, Washington, USA, was particularly devastating, traveling across a 1-km-plus-wide river valley, killing 43 people, destroying dozens of homes, and temporarily closing a well-traveled highway. (2019-06-26)

Future tsunamis possible in the Red Sea's Gulf of Elat-Aqaba
Researchers who took a closer look at a 1995 tsunami in the Gulf of Elat-Aqaba, at the northeastern tip of the Red Sea, say that the gulf's surrounding countries should prepare for future tsunami hazards in the economically developing vital region. (2019-06-12)

Precursors of a catastrophic collapse
The flanks of many island volcanoes slide very slowly towards the sea. Whether these landslides are forewarnings of a catastrophic collapse or, on the contrary, even reduce its risk, is not yet understood. Geophysicists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel have now published a study in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, which shows that sporadic, slow landslides on the small volcanic island of Ritter Island in New Guinea preceded a catastrophic collapse. (2019-05-16)

The moon is quaking as it shrinks
A new analysis suggests that the moon is actively shrinking and producing moonquakes along thousands of cliffs called thrust faults spread over the moon's surface. The faults are likely the result of the moon's interior cooling and shrinking, causing the surface crust to shrivel and crack like a raisin's skin. The research, published in Nature Geoscience, combines data from NASA's Apollo and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter missions. (2019-05-13)

When sand behaves like oil
Sand, coffee grounds and rice behave very differently than water or oil, but under certain conditions they will suddenly exhibit astonishing similarities. Scientists have found a way to better understand the behaviour of granular materials. (2019-05-08)

Rapid permafrost thaw unrecognized threat to landscape, global warming researcher warns
University of Guelph Prof. Merritt Turetsky and an international team of researchers asssessed abrupt thaw studies across the permafrost zone to estimate the overall effect. They found carbon emissions have the potential to double the climate feedback associated with permafrost thawing because abrupt thaw releases more methane. It will also have drastic effects on landscape, from altering traditional travel and hunting patterns in the North, to causing costly infrastructure damage to roads and rail lines. (2019-04-30)

Quick reconnaissance after 2018 Anchorage quake reveals signs of ground failure
A day after the Nov. 30, 2018, magnitude 7 earthquake in Anchorage, Alaska, US Geological Survey scientists Robert Witter and Adrian Bender had taken to the skies. The researchers were surveying the region from a helicopter, looking for signs of ground failure from landslides to liquefaction. (2019-04-26)

NASA-NOAA satellite catches intense Tropical Cyclone Kenneth make landfall in northern Mozambique
Mozambique is still recovering from deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai, and a second powerful tropical cyclone has now made landfall in the country. As NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, it captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth making landfall in northern Mozambique. (2019-04-25)

Minerals in mountain rivers tell the story of landslide activity upstream
Scientists have come up with a new way of analyzing sand in mountain rivers to determine the activity of landslides upstream, which has important implications for understanding natural hazards in mountainous regions. (2019-04-24)

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