Current Language development News and Events

Current Language development News and Events, Language development News Articles.
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Artificial intelligence technology helps Parkinson's patients during COVID-19 pandemic
Jessica Huber, a professor of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences and associate dean for research in Purdue's College of Health and Human Sciences, leads Purdue's Motor Speech Lab. Huber and her team are now doing virtual studies to evaluate speech disorders related to Parkinson's using artificial intelligence technology platforms. (2020-11-24)

Newfound ability to change baby brain activity could lead to rehabilitation for injured brains
Researchers from King's College London have identified the brain activity for the first time in a newborn baby when they are learning an association between different types of sensory experiences. Using advanced MRI scanning techniques and robotics, the researchers found that a baby's brain activity can be changed through these associations, shedding new light on the possibility of rehabilitating babies with injured brains and promoting the development of life-long skills such as speech, language and movement. (2020-11-23)

New test reveals AI still lacks common sense
Natural language processing (NLP) has taken great strides recently--but how much does AI understand of what it reads? Less than we thought, according to researchers at USC's Department of Computer Science. In a recent paper Assistant Professor Xiang Ren and PhD student Yuchen Lin found that despite advances, AI still doesn't have the common sense needed to generate plausible sentences. (2020-11-18)

Learning a new language changes the brain's division of labor
Learning a language later in life changes how the two halves of the brain contribute. As skills improve, language comprehension changes hemisphere specialization, but production does not, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-17)

Actively speaking two languages protects against cognitive decline
According to a study led by Marco Calabria, a researcher of the Speech Production and Bilingualism research group and of the Cognitive NeuroLab at the UOC, the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment in Alzheimer patients with a higher degree of bilingualism is delayed. (2020-11-16)

Children misdiagnosed with "impairment of language acquisition"
Around 45% of children in Austrian day nurseries have a first language other than German. Those who our experiencing difficulty in learning the second language are often diagnosed as having a suspected ''impairment of language acquisition''. In fact, this often merely reflects the fact that they have not yet fully acquired the second language. (2020-11-16)

Individualized brain stimulation therapy improves language performance in stroke survivors
Individualized brain stimulation therapy improves language performance in stroke survivors. (2020-11-12)

New approach to circuit compression could deliver real-world quantum computers years ahead of schedu
A major technical challenge for any practical, real-world quantum computer comes from the need for a large number of physical qubits to deal with errors that accumulate during computation. Such quantum error correction is resource-intensive and computationally time-consuming. But researchers have found an effective software method that enables significant compression of quantum circuits, relaxing the demands placed on hardware development. (2020-11-12)

RUDN University linguists: Vocabulary size affects ability to differentiate foreign language vowels
A team of linguists from RUDN University established that a person's ability to accurately differentiate between vowel sounds of a foreign language correlates with the size of their vocabulary in said language. (2020-11-10)

Mari and Karelian respondents share ideas on how to improve local education
Based on the findings, researchers have come up with a list of recommendations that would support the development of education systems and educational opportunities in the Republic of Mari El and the Republic of Karelia in accordance with the wishes and needs of their Indigenous communities. (2020-11-10)

Improving the Endangered Species Act requires more than rule reversal
Although species are disappearing at an alarming rate worldwide, the Trump administration recently finalized a series of substantial changes to the regulations that underpin the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), several of which effectively undermine species conservation. (2020-11-05)

Data science pathway prepares radiology residents for machine learning
A recently developed data science pathway for fourth-year radiology residents will help prepare the next generation of radiologists to lead the way into the era of artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI-ML), according to a special report. (2020-11-04)

Artificial intelligence (AI)-aided disease prediction
Artificial Intelligence (AI)-aided Disease Prediction https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0017 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors Chenxi Liu, Dian Jiao and Zhe Liu, from Tianjin University, Tianjin, China consider artificial intelligence (AI) aided disease prediction. (2020-10-28)

Researcher found female candidates are more likely to discuss the economy than males
In a new study published in Politics & Policy, Deserai Crow, PhD, associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver in the School of Public Affairs, found significant differences in discussion topics between both party affiliation and gender. Narratives from both Republican and Democratic candidates in 48 U.S. House campaigns from the 2018 midterm election were analyzed in this study. (2020-10-26)

Humans are born with brains 'prewired' to see words
Humans are born with a part of the brain that is prewired to be receptive to seeing words and letters, setting the stage at birth for people to learn how to read, a new study suggests. Analyzing brain scans of newborns, researchers found that this part of the brain - called the ''visual word form area'' (VWFA) - is connected to the language network of the brain. (2020-10-22)

Paper: Congress must clarify limits of gene-editing technologies
How the next Congress decides to handle the issue editing human sperm and eggs will affect the science, ethics and financing of genomic editing for decades to come, said Jacob S. Sherkow, a professor of law at Illinois who studies the ethical and policy implications of advanced biotechnologies. (2020-10-21)

Building blocks of language evolved 30-40 million years ago
The capacity for language is built upon our ability to understand combinations of words and the relationships between them, but the evolutionary history of this ability is little understood. Now, researchers from the University of Warwick have managed to date this capacity to at least 30-40 million years ago, the last common ancestor of monkeys, apes and humans. (2020-10-21)

Cognitive elements of language have existed for 40 million years
Humans are not the only beings that can identify rules in complex language-like constructions -- monkeys and great apes can do so, too, a study at the University of Zurich has shown. Researchers at the Department of Comparative Language Science of UZH used a series of experiments based on an 'artificial grammar' to conclude that this ability can be traced back to our ancient primate ancestors. (2020-10-21)

How fear encourages physical distancing during pandemic
Despite guidelines plastered on the walls and floors of grocery and retail stores encouraging customers to maintain six-feet of physical distance during the pandemic, many do not. A new study by researchers at the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management identifies two key messaging components that could improve the persuasiveness of those appeals and trigger compliance. (2020-10-21)

An integrated approach to ultrasound imaging in medicine and biology
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this editorial, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Pingtong Huang considers an integrated approach to ultrasound imaging in medicine and biology. (2020-10-19)

Novel software assesses phonologial awareness
Understanding sounds in language is a critical building block for child literacy, yet this skill is often overlooked. Researchers from Michigan State University have developed a new software tool to assess children's phonological awareness -- or, how they process the sound structure of words. (2020-10-14)

Is English the lingua franca of science? Not for everyone
A UC Berkeley graduate student surveyed young Colombian scientists and found that for many, having to read, write and present in English can be a burden, in terms of anxiety, time and cost. Some forego oral presentations at meetings because of poor English skills. Many call on English speaking friends to edit manuscipts, or pay for editing. In the Spanish speaking global south, English is one more barrier to full participation in science. (2020-10-14)

UMD researchers use artificial intelligence language tools to decode molecular movements
University of Maryland researchers used language processing AI to turn molecular movements into stories that reveal what forms a protein can take and how and when it changes form--key information for understanding disease and developing targeted therapeutics. This research appears in the October 09, 2020, issue of Nature Communications. (2020-10-09)

Avoiding ableist language in autism research
Ableist language is often used by autism researchers, which assumes that autistic people are ''broken'' or inferior to non-autistic people. (2020-10-08)

RUDN University linguist: learning foreign language is harder for visually impaired people
A scientist from RUDN University analysed the effect of visual impairment on a person's perception of unfamiliar sounds when learning a foreign language. The experiment showed that lack of access to visual cues makes learning difficult. (2020-10-06)

A simple enrollment change yields big dividends in children's early learning program
Researchers know that texting programs can greatly benefit young children's literacy. Now new research shows that parents' participation in such programs can be boosted exponentially with one simple tweak: automatic enrollment, combined with the ability to opt out. (2020-10-06)

Female Spanish-only speakers get screening mammograms less often than other women
Limited English-language proficiency (LEP) is a risk factor for getting potentially lifesaving screening mammograms less often. (2020-10-03)

A social-belonging intervention improves STEM outcomes for ESL students
A study conducted at 19 universities by IU researchers and their colleagues in the US and Canada, found that a brief social belonging exercise, administered online before students arrive on campus, boosts the performance and persistence of students in STEM disciplines - science, technology, engineering and math - who speak English as a second language. (2020-10-02)

Scale-adaptive auto-context-guided fetal US segmentation with structured random forests
https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0016 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this article the authors Xin Yang, Haoming Li, Li Liu, and Dong Ni from Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China and Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China consider Scale-adaptive Auto-context-guided Fetal US Segmentation with Structured Random Forests. (2020-10-02)

Artificial intelligence in art: a simple tool or creative genius?
Intelligent algorithms are used to create paintings, write poems, and compose music. According to a study by an international team of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the Center of Humans and Machines at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, whether people perceive artificial intelligence (AI) as the ingenious creator of art or simply another tool used by artists depends on how information about AI art is presented. The results were published in the journal iScience. (2020-09-30)

Welsh-medium school pupils underperform in tests despite more advantaged backgrounds
Secondary schools in Wales that teach pupils through the medium of Welsh are outperformed by their English-speaking counterparts in maths, reading and science tests, according to a new study by Lancaster University. The average results of pupils attending Welsh-language secondary schools are markedly lower than pupils in English-language schools - despite Welsh-medium school pupils having more books available at home, spending more time on their studies outside of school and fewer qualifying for free school meals. (2020-09-29)

Early MRI scans can predict motor development risks for preterm infants
A new software tool developed at Cincinnati Children's can employ early MRI scan data to predict which preterm infants are most at risk of brain developmental disorders. (2020-09-29)

Covid-19: Social distancing is more effective than travel bans
Travel bans will delay the peak of infection with days, while social distancing has a much stronger impact, amounting in up to 4 weeks delay, scientists report. (2020-09-28)

New education 'hubs' for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close
New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said. (2020-09-24)

Next-gen bioinformatics tool enables big data analysis without programming expertise
A new data analysis tool developed by MD Anderson researchers incorporates a user-friendly, natural-language interface to aid biomedical researchers without bioinformatics or programming expertise to conduct intuitive data. (2020-09-24)

Reading in company boosts creativity
Language has evolved as a consequence of social interaction; however, most research is conducted with participants in isolation. What happens in our brain when we read in the company of others? Is it the same as reading alone? Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid and the Carlos III Health Institute have found that company is conducive to a more creative and integrated understanding of language, whereas isolation favours more systematic and automatic language processing. (2020-09-22)

Homicides near schools affect students' educational outcomes
Homicides near schools negatively impact on the educational attainment of children, a new study in the Journal of Labor Economics reports. (2020-09-21)

Actively speaking two languages protects against cognitive impairment
A study has shown that Alzheimer's patients with a higher degree of bilingualism receive a later diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (2020-09-18)

New roles for clinicians in the age of artificial intelligence
New Roles for Clinicians in the Age of Artificial Intelligence https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0014 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this opinion article the authors Fengyi Zeng, Xiaowen Liang and Zhiyi Chen from The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China consider new roles for clinicians in the age of artificial intelligence (AI). (2020-09-18)

RIT/NTID researchers study how deaf and hearing people watch sign language
A recent study has shown that readers' eye gaze behaviors are strong indicators of words that are unexpected, new, or difficult to understand. The study by Rain Bosworth, an assistant professor and researcher in the Center for Sensory, Perceptual, and Cognitive Ecology (SPaCE Center) at Rochester Institute of Technology's National Technical Institute for the Deaf, explores the unknown qualities of gaze behavior for 'sign watching' and how these are affected by a user's language expertise and intelligibility of the sign input. (2020-09-09)

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