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Early-life education improves memory in old age -- Especially for women
Education appears to protect older adults, especially women, against memory loss, according to a study by investigators at Georgetown University Medical Center, published in the journal Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition (2020-06-05)
Study shows some infants can identify differences in musical tones at six months
New research from neuroscientists at York University suggests the capacity to hear the highs and lows, also known as the major and minor notes in music, may come before you take a single lesson; you may actually be born with it. (2020-06-04)
Certain personality traits may affect risk of 'pre-dementia'
A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society examined five personality traits--neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, and openness--and their links to pre-dementia conditions called motoric cognitive risk (MCR) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) syndromes. (2020-06-03)
Children improve their narrative performance with the help of rhythmic gestures
Gesture is an integral part of language development. Recent studies carried out by the same authors in collaboration with other members of the Prosodic Studies Group (GrEP) coordinated by Pilar Prieto, ICREA research professor Department of Translation and Language Sciences at UPF, have shown that when the speaker accompanies oral communication with rhythmic gesture, preschool children are observed to better understand the message and improve their oral skills. (2020-06-03)
No laughing matter
A new study involving a scientific analysis of the prevalence of 'LOL' in students' text messages demonstrates important potential applications for classroom learning. (2020-05-27)
Exploring the use of 'stretchable' words in social media
An investigation of Twitter messages reveals new insights and tools for studying how people use stretched words, such as 'duuuuude,' 'heyyyyy,' or 'noooooooo.' Tyler Gray and colleagues at the University of Vermont in Burlington present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 27, 2020. (2020-05-27)
The prevention of childhood obesity would require stricter advertising regulations
Spain ranks fifth among European countries for childhood obesity. Sugar-sweetened beverages and soft drinks are consumed by 81% of Spanish children weekly. (2020-05-26)
Chimpanzees help trace the evolution of human speech back to ancient ancestors
One of the most promising theories for the evolution of human speech has finally received support from chimpanzee communication, in a study conducted by a group of researchers led by the University of Warwick. (2020-05-26)
Gestures heard as well as seen
Gesturing with the hands while speaking is a common human behavior, but no one knows why we do it. (2020-05-18)
Chinese to rise as a global language
With the continuing rise of China as a global economic and trading power, there is no barrier to prevent Chinese from becoming a global language like English, according to Flinders University academic Dr Jeffrey Gil. (2020-05-17)
Oink, oink makes the pig
In a new study, neuroscientists at TU Dresden demonstrated that the use of gestures and pictures makes foreign language teaching in primary schools more effective and sustainable. (2020-05-13)
Detecting dyslexia with interactions that do not require a knowledge of language
Dyslexia is a specific learning disorder that affects 5 - 15% of the world population. (2020-05-13)
Day services benefit patients with Alzheimer's disease
Day services--programs designed to provide stimulation in a safe environment during the day for adults with physical and mental impairments -- may help improve the cognitive function of adults with Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in Psychogeriatrics. (2020-05-06)
Similar brain glitch found in slips of signing, speaking
The discovery of a common neural mechanism in speech and ASL errors -- one that occurs in just 40 milliseconds -- could improve recovery in deaf signers after a stroke. (2020-05-04)
SUTD research shows evidence that bilingualism delays the brain's aging process
SUTD study found that seniors who speak two languages actively tend to maintain specific executive control abilities against natural age-related declines. (2020-05-04)
Study reveals rich genetic diversity of Vietnam
In a new paper, Dang Liu, Mark Stoneking and colleagues have analyzed newly generated genome-wide SNP data for the Kinh and 21 additional ethnic groups in Vietnam, encompassing all five major language families in MSEA, along with previously published data from nearby populations and ancient samples. (2020-04-28)
What protects minority languages from extinction?
A new study by Jean-Marc Luck from Paris and Anita Mehta from Oxford published in EPJ B, uses mathematical modelling to suggest two mechanisms through which majority and minority languages come to coexist in the same area. (2020-04-22)
Behavioral intervention, not lovastatin, improves language skills in youth with fragile X
A UC Davis Health study found more evidence for the efficacy of telehealth-delivered behavioral intervention in treating language problems in youth with fragile X syndrome. (2020-04-21)
Origins of human language pathway in the brain at least 25 million years old
The human language pathway in the brain has been identified by scientists as being at least 25 million years old -- 20 million years older than previously thought. (2020-04-20)
In politics and pandemics, trolls use fear, anger to drive clicks
A new CU Boulder study shows that Facebook ads developed and shared by Russian trolls around the 2016 election were clicked on nine times more than typical social media ads. (2020-03-26)
Culturally adapted materials boost Latino participation in diabetes education programs
An Oregon State University study published last week found that diabetes education programs that are linguistically and culturally tailored to Latinos lead to significantly higher rates of completion among Latino participants -- even higher than rates among non-Latinos enrolled in the English versions of those programs. (2020-03-25)
Found in mistranslation
In a new study, scientists from Deepa Agashe's group at NCBS find that irrespective of which proteins are impacted, there is indeed a benefit to non-specific mistranslation. (2020-03-25)
Researchers develop language test for people with Fragile X syndrome
Researchers have developed a test to measure the expressive language skills of people with Fragile X syndrome, a genetic disorder that may result in intellectual disability, cognitive impairment and symptoms of autism spectrum disorder. (2020-03-24)
Stroke: When the system fails for the second time
After a stroke, there is an increased risk of suffering a second one. (2020-03-23)
Analyzing patients shortly after stroke can help link brain regions to speech functions
New research from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine shows analyzing the brains of stroke victims just days after the stroke allows researchers to link various speech functions to different parts of the brain, an important breakthrough that may lead to better treatment and recovery. (2020-03-23)
Chatty kids do better at school
A study from the University of York found that children from families of higher socioeconomic status had better language abilities at nursery school age and that these verbal skills boosted their later academic performance throughout school. (2020-03-23)
Five language outcome measures evaluated for intellectual disabilities studies
Expressive language sampling yielded five language-related outcome measures that may be useful for treatment studies in intellectual disabilities, especially fragile X syndrome. (2020-03-23)
Health forums: Style of language influences credibility and trust
Informations on health topics in Internet forums are often so complex that laypersons are barely able to form considered judgements on the advice. (2020-03-20)
We're getting better at wildlife conservation, AI study of scientific abstracts suggests
Researchers are using a kind of machine learning known as sentiment analysis to assess the successes and failures of wildlife conservation over time. (2020-03-19)
Facebook users change their language before an emergency hospital visit
The language in Facebook posts becomes less formal and invokes family more often in the lead-up to an emergency room visit. (2020-03-12)
At 8 months, babies already know their grammar
Even before uttering their first words, babies master the grammar basics of their mother tongue. (2020-03-12)
Facebook language changes before an emergency hospital visit
A new study published in Nature Scientific Reports reveals that the language people use on Facebook subtly changes before they make a visit to the emergency department (ED). (2020-03-12)
Pain researchers get a common language to describe pain
Pain researchers around the world have agreed to classify pain in the mouth, jaw and face according to the same system. (2020-03-10)
University of Surrey's 'SMART' study awarded £426k to make multilingual content accessible
The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), part of UK Research and Innovation, has awarded £426,000 to the University of Surrey to undertake a ground-breaking investigation into interlingual live subtitling via respeaking. (2020-03-09)
Household chemical use linked to child language delays
Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found. (2020-03-04)
Bilingualism acts as a cognitive reserve factor against dementia
The conclusions of a study carried out by Víctor Costumero, as the first author, Marco Calabria and Albert Costa (died in 2018), members of the Speech Production and Bilingualism (SPB) group at the Cognition and Brain Center (CBC) of the Department of Information Technology and the Communications (DTIC) of the UPF, together with researchers from the Universities of Jaume I, Valencia, Barcelona and Jaén; IDIBELL, Hospital La Fe (Valencia) and Grupo Médico ERESA (Valencia). (2020-03-04)
Researchers gather interventions addressing 'word gap' into special edition of journa
Investigators at the University of Kansas edited a special issue of Early Childhood Research Quarterly gathering 18 language-intervention research and empirical studies that address the word gap. (2020-03-04)
How computational linguistics helps to understand how language works
Distributional semantics obtains representations of the meaning of words by processing thousands of texts and extracting generalizations using computational algorithms. (2020-03-03)
Changing the debate around obesity
The UK's National Health Service (NHS) needs to do more to address the ingrained stigma and discrimination faced by people with obesity, says a leading health psychologist. (2020-03-03)
Not a 'math person'? You may be better at learning to code than you think
New research from the University of Washington finds that a natural aptitude for learning languages is a stronger predictor of learning to program than basic math knowledge. (2020-03-02)
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