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Current Language News and Events, Language News Articles.
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Novel software assesses phonologial awareness
Understanding sounds in language is a critical building block for child literacy, yet this skill is often overlooked. (2020-10-14)
UMD researchers use artificial intelligence language tools to decode molecular movements
University of Maryland researchers used language processing AI to turn molecular movements into stories that reveal what forms a protein can take and how and when it changes form--key information for understanding disease and developing targeted therapeutics. (2020-10-09)
Avoiding ableist language in autism research
Ableist language is often used by autism researchers, which assumes that autistic people are ''broken'' or inferior to non-autistic people. (2020-10-08)
RUDN University linguist: learning foreign language is harder for visually impaired people
A scientist from RUDN University analysed the effect of visual impairment on a person's perception of unfamiliar sounds when learning a foreign language. (2020-10-06)
A simple enrollment change yields big dividends in children's early learning program
Researchers know that texting programs can greatly benefit young children's literacy. (2020-10-06)
Female Spanish-only speakers get screening mammograms less often than other women
Limited English-language proficiency (LEP) is a risk factor for getting potentially lifesaving screening mammograms less often. (2020-10-03)
A social-belonging intervention improves STEM outcomes for ESL students
A study conducted at 19 universities by IU researchers and their colleagues in the US and Canada, found that a brief social belonging exercise, administered online before students arrive on campus, boosts the performance and persistence of students in STEM disciplines - science, technology, engineering and math - who speak English as a second language. (2020-10-02)
Welsh-medium school pupils underperform in tests despite more advantaged backgrounds
Secondary schools in Wales that teach pupils through the medium of Welsh are outperformed by their English-speaking counterparts in maths, reading and science tests, according to a new study by Lancaster University. (2020-09-29)
Early MRI scans can predict motor development risks for preterm infants
A new software tool developed at Cincinnati Children's can employ early MRI scan data to predict which preterm infants are most at risk of brain developmental disorders. (2020-09-29)
New education 'hubs' for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close
New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said. (2020-09-24)
Next-gen bioinformatics tool enables big data analysis without programming expertise
A new data analysis tool developed by MD Anderson researchers incorporates a user-friendly, natural-language interface to aid biomedical researchers without bioinformatics or programming expertise to conduct intuitive data. (2020-09-24)
Reading in company boosts creativity
Language has evolved as a consequence of social interaction; however, most research is conducted with participants in isolation. (2020-09-22)
Homicides near schools affect students' educational outcomes
Homicides near schools negatively impact on the educational attainment of children, a new study in the Journal of Labor Economics reports. (2020-09-21)
Actively speaking two languages protects against cognitive impairment
A study has shown that Alzheimer's patients with a higher degree of bilingualism receive a later diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (2020-09-18)
RIT/NTID researchers study how deaf and hearing people watch sign language
A recent study has shown that readers' eye gaze behaviors are strong indicators of words that are unexpected, new, or difficult to understand. (2020-09-09)
Children use both brain hemispheres to understand language, unlike adults
Infants and young children have brains with a superpower, of sorts, say Georgetown University Medical Center neuroscientists. (2020-09-07)
Quality over quantity in recovering language after stroke
New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found that intensive therapy is not necessarily best when it comes to treating the loss of language and communication in early recovery after a stroke. (2020-09-06)
Inequality of opportunity drags down everyone's motivation
Unequal compensation reduces people's motivation to work, even among those who stand to benefit from unfair advantages, finds a new UCL-led study published in PLOS One. (2020-09-04)
Bilingual children may lose less brain matter as they grow up
Children and adolescents who speak more than one language may reach adulthood with better brain structure, according to a new study. (2020-09-02)
Words matter: Revealing 'how' restaurateurs land investors online
Online crowdfunding is a multibillion dollar industry, but crafting a compelling pitch that stands out among thousands of projects and lands investors is challenging, especially in the restaurant industry. (2020-09-01)
Aspirated consonants may promote the spread of COVID-19, RUDN University linguist says
According to a linguist from RUDN University, the number of COVID-19 cases in a country might be related to the existence of aspirated consonants in its main language of communication. (2020-08-30)
Why are there differing preferences for suffixes and prefixes across languages?
While speakers of English and other Western languages prefer using suffixes more than prefixes, a new study reveals that this preference is not as universal as once thought. (2020-08-28)
A.I. tool promises faster, more accurate Alzheimer's diagnosis
By detecting subtle differences in the way that Alzheimer's sufferers use language, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed an A.I. algorithm that promises to accurately diagnose Alzheimer's without the need for expensive scans or in-person testing. (2020-08-27)
QUT algorithm could quash Twitter abuse of women
Online abuse targeting women, including threats of harm or sexual violence, has proliferated across all social media platforms but QUT researchers have developed a sophisticated statistical model to identify misogynistic content and help drum it out of the Twittersphere. (2020-08-27)
When two tribes go to war -- how tribalism polarized the Brexit social media debate
Tribal behaviour on social media widened the gulf between Remain and Leave voters in the United Kingdom's debate whether to leave the European Union, re-aligned the UK's political landscape, and made people increasingly susceptible to disinformation campaigns, new research from the University of Bath shows. (2020-08-26)
Words used to describe alcohol intoxication may give clues to drinking habits
Penn State research suggests the language young adults use to describe the effects they feel from drinking may give insight into their drinking habits. (2020-08-19)
Analysis of ancient Mesoamerican sculptures supports universality of emotional expressions
An analysis of facial expressions in ancient Mesoamerican sculptures finds that some emotions expressed in these artworks match the emotions that modern US participants would anticipate for each discernible context, including elation, sadness, pain, anger, and determination or strain. (2020-08-19)
Analysis shows that political speeches now use simpler language, express more sentiments
Research by Kansas State University shows how politicians from both major parties have changed their political speech from previous centuries. (2020-08-18)
Mother bats use baby talk to communicate with their pups
When addressing infants, human adults tend to change the speed, pitch and ''color'' of their voice. (2020-08-18)
Machine learning reveals role of culture in shaping meanings of words
What do we mean by the word beautiful? It depends not only on whom you ask, but in what language you ask them. (2020-08-17)
Adaptation in single neurons provides memory for language processing
To understand language, we have to remember the words that were uttered and combine them into an interpretation. (2020-08-12)
Non-invasive nerve stimulation boosts learning of foreign language sounds
New research by neuroscientists at the University of Pittsburgh and UC San Francisco (UCSF) revealed that a simple, earbud-like device developed at UCSF that imperceptibly stimulates the brain could significantly improve the wearer's ability to learn the sounds of a new language. (2020-08-06)
Cancer vs. COVID: When a pandemic upended cancer care
A team of researchers interviewed physicians and patients at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic to identify eight scenarios impacting cancer care. (2020-08-06)
Language may undermine women in science and tech
Researchers examined gender stereotypes baked into 25 languages to explore why fewer women enter science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. (2020-08-03)
Medical journals' commercial publishing contracts may lead to biased articles
Scientists have long been concerned that the common practice of medical journals accepting commercial payments from pharmaceutical companies may lead to pro-industry bias in published articles. (2020-07-27)
3D hand-sensing wristband signals future of wearable tech
In a potential breakthrough in wearable sensing technology, researchers from Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin, Madison, have designed a wrist-mounted device that continuously tracks the entire human hand in 3D. (2020-07-20)
Pre-brain surgery test protects language in some tumors
A preoperative procedure might enable surgeons to protect the language centers during brain tumor removal without needing to keep patients awake during surgery. (2020-07-16)
Study finds hidden emotions in the sound of words
In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, it's common to feel stress levels rise every time we hear the word ''virus.'' But new Cornell-led research reveals that the sound of the word itself was likely to raise your blood pressure - even before ''corona'' was added to it. (2020-07-14)
Early childhood education centers can boost parents' engagement at home
When early childhood education centers communicate well with parents, those parents are more likely to engage in educational activities with their children at home, a new University of Arizona study finds. (2020-07-07)
Researchers foresee linguistic issues during space travel
It lacks the drama of a shape-shifting alien creature, but another threat looms over the prospect of generations-long, interstellar space travel: Explorers arriving on Xanadu could face problems communicating with previous and subsequent arrivals, their spoken language having changed in isolation along the way. (2020-07-06)
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