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Current Language News and Events, Language News Articles.
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Deaf infants' gaze behavior more advanced than that of hearing infants
Deaf infants who have been exposed to American Sign Language are better at following an adult's gaze than their hearing peers, supporting the idea that social-cognitive development is sensitive to different kinds of life experiences. (2019-10-16)
The brain does not follow the head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. (2019-10-15)
Read to kids in Spanish; it'll help their English
Immigrant parents worry their children will struggle with reading and fret that as non-English speakers, they can't help. (2019-10-15)
Deaf infants more attuned to parent's visual cues
A University of Washington-led study finds that Deaf infants exposed to American Sign Language are especially tuned to a parent's eye gaze, itself a social connection between parent and child that is linked to early learning. (2019-10-15)
HKU-led study on language speed and efficiency
Are some languages more efficient than others? In a recent study led by the University of Hong Kong (HKU) titled 'Different languages, similar encoding efficiency: comparable information rates across the human communicative niche', an international and interdisciplinary team comprising scientists at the Laboratoire Dynamique Du Langage (France), Ajou University (South Korea) and HKU analyzed 17 languages and found that all languages convey information at similar rates, regardless of whether they are spoken faster or slower. (2019-10-10)
Linguists track impact of cognitive decline across three decades of one writer's diaries
Linguistics researchers have identified a relationship between language change and the transition from healthy to a diagnosis of severe dementia. (2019-10-10)
To learn English, bilingual children need robust vocabulary from parents and caregivers
A study examining parents' vocabulary and grammar as an influence on children's acquisition of English, finds that the quality of child-directed speech depends on the speaker's language proficiency. (2019-10-09)
How do children express their state of knowledge of the world around them?
A study published in Journal of Language, Learning and Development by researchers with the Prosodic Studies Group led by Pilar Prieto, ICREA research professor with the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, reveals for the first time that three-year-olds use gestural and prosodic precursors in the expression of uncertainty, which they will express after five years of age through lexical cues. (2019-10-09)
Children's language skills may be harmed by social hardship
Children from disadvantaged backgrounds are three times more likely to develop difficulties with language than those from more affluent areas, research suggests. (2019-10-08)
NYU scholar makes recommendations to end disparities in stem for English learners
In her latest research article, published in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), NYU Professor Okhee Lee provides recommendations to support a federal mandate in the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 which requires that English language proficiency standards align with content standards. (2019-10-08)
Focus on employability boosts universities' success in the Teaching Excellence Framework
Universities' Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) grades -- designed to help students choose where to study -- are being boosted for the institutions that highlight employability post-university and student outcomes in their TEF submission reports, according to a new study published in Educational Review. (2019-10-08)
Why the language-ready brain is so complex
In a review article published in Science, Peter Hagoort, professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at Radboud University and director of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, argues for a new model of language, involving the interaction of multiple brain networks. (2019-10-03)
Neuroimaging reveals hidden communication between brain layers during reading
Language involves many different regions of the brain. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and the Donders Institute at Radboud University discovered previously hidden connections between brain layers during reading, in a neuroimaging study reported in PNAS. (2019-10-01)
Mild-to-moderate hearing loss in children leads to changes in how brain processes sound
Deafness in early childhood is known to lead to lasting changes in how sounds are processed in the brain, but new research published today in eLife shows that even mild-to-moderate levels of hearing loss in young children can lead to similar changes. (2019-10-01)
How meaning is represented in the human brain
Representations reflecting non-linguistic experience have been detected in brain activity during reading in study of healthy, native English speakers published in JNeurosci. (2019-09-30)
Mechanisms of real-time speech interpretation in the human brain revealed
Scientists have come a step closer to understanding how we're able to understand spoken language so rapidly, and it involves a huge and complex set of computations in the brain. (2019-09-30)
Brain imaging shows how nonverbal children with autism have slower response to sounds
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) used state-of-the-art brain imaging techniques to determine how nonverbal or minimally verbal people who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD) processes auditory stimuli, which could have important diagnostic and prognostic implications across the autism spectrum. (2019-09-18)
Low-cost blood pressure drug improves brain function in individuals with autism
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders have discovered a version of the drug known as propranolol could provide cognitive and social benefits for those living with autism spectrum disorder. (2019-09-18)
Hello, world! A new approach for physics in de sitter space
For decades, physicists have been attempting to reconcile quantum mechanics, the physics of the very small, with gravity, the physics of the very large. (2019-09-17)
What multilingual nuns can tell us about dementia
A strong ability in languages may help reduce the risk of developing dementia, says a new University of Waterloo study. (2019-09-12)
Poor motor skills predict long-term language impairments for children with autism
Fine motor skills - used for eating, writing and buttoning clothing - may be a strong predictor for identifying whether children with autism are at risk for long-term language disabilities, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2019-09-11)
Do as i say: Translating language into movement
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a computer model that can translate text describing physical movements directly into simple computer-generated animations, a first step toward someday generating movies directly from scripts. (2019-09-10)
Building blocks of bird babble identified
A new study by an international team headed by the University of Zurich sheds light on whether animal vocalizations, like human words, are constructed from smaller building blocks. (2019-09-09)
'Building blocks' of bird calls resemble human languages
New study sheds light on whether animal vocalisations, like human words, are constructed from smaller building-blocks. (2019-09-09)
South African study highlights links between low language ability and poor mental health
A new study from our researchers at the universities of Bath (UK) and Stellenbosch (South Africa) focuses on language acquisition for young people in Khayelitsha near Cape Town. (2019-09-06)
Having an elder brother is associated with slower language development
Several studies had already demonstrated that children who have an elder sibling have poorer linguistic performance than those who have none. (2019-09-05)
Similar information rates across languages, despite divergent speech rates
Spanish may seem to be spoken at a higher speed than Vietnamese, but that doesn't make it any more 'efficient'. (2019-09-05)
Study shows exposure to multiple languages may make it easier to learn one
A new study from the University of Washington finds that, based on brain activity, people who live in communities where multiple languages are spoken can identify words in yet another language better than those who live in a monolingual environment. (2019-09-05)
Study shows the social benefits of political incorrectness
Using politically incorrect speech can incite controversy but also brings social benefits: It's a powerful way to appear authentic. (2019-09-05)
NUS study reveals similarities in human, chimpanzee, and bonobo eye colour patterns
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have revealed that chimpanzees and bonobos share the contrasting colour pattern seen in human eyes, which makes it easy for them to detect the direction of someone's gaze from a distance. (2019-09-04)
Autism study stresses importance of communicating with all infants
A new study from a UT Dallas assistant professor affiliated with the Infant Brain Imaging Study network that included infants later diagnosed with autism suggests that all children benefit from exposure to rich speech environments from their caregivers. (2019-09-04)
Unhappy mothers talk more to their baby boys, study finds
Mothers who are dissatisfied with their male partners spend more time talking to their infants -- but only if the child is a boy, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2019-09-03)
Human perception of colors does not rely entirely on language, a case study
After patient RDS (identified only by his initials for privacy) suffered a stroke, he experienced a rare and unusual side effect: when he saw something red, blue, green, or any other chromatic hue, he could not name the object's color. (2019-09-03)
Comparing primate vocalizations
The language of Old World monkeys, some of our primate cousins, may be more sophisticated than previously realized. (2019-09-03)
Victorian child hearing-loss databank to go global
A unique databank that profiles children with hearing loss will help researchers globally understand why some children adapt and thrive, while others struggle. (2019-08-30)
Kids wore video cameras in their preschool class, for science
They may all be in the same classroom together, but each child in preschool may have a very different experience, a new study suggests. (2019-08-28)
Women are beautiful, men rational
Men are typically described by words that refer to behavior, while adjectives ascribed to women tend to be associated with physical appearance. (2019-08-27)
Social, executive brain functions crucial for communication
Impairments in social and executive brain functions hinder effective communication, according to research in patients with dementia recently published in eNeuro. (2019-08-26)
Stable home lives improve prospects for preemies
Researchers at at Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-08-26)
Study identifies possible genetic link between children's language and mental health
University of York-led study has examined genetic variants in six genes that are thought to contribute to language development in children. (2019-08-19)
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