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Current Language News and Events, Language News Articles.
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Can science writing be automated?
A neural network developed at MIT and elsewhere can ''read'' scientific research papers and generate plain-English summaries of their contents. (2019-04-18)
Associating colors with vowels? Almost all of us do!
Does [a:] as in baa sound more green or more red? (2019-04-04)
How the brain finds meaning in metaphor
Whether you bend a rod or bend the rules, the brain processes the word 'bend' similarly, with the sensory motor region playing a key role, according to new research by University of Arizona assistant professor of psychology Vicky Lai. (2019-04-01)
April Fools hoax stories could offer clues to help identify 'fake news'
Academic experts in natural language processing from Lancaster University who are interested in deception have compared the language used within written April Fools hoaxes and fake news stories. (2019-03-29)
Kids store 1.5 megabytes of information to master their native language
Learning one's native language may seem effortless. But new research from UC Berkeley suggests that language acquisition between birth and 18 is a remarkable feat of cognition, rather than something humans are just hardwired to do. (2019-03-27)
Gesturing related to storytelling style, not nationality, study
New research by University of Alberta scientists suggests that the amount you gesture when telling a story has more to do with what you're saying than where you're from. (2019-03-26)
Women are 30 percent less likely to be considered for a hiring process than men
Women are on average 30% less likely to be called for a job interview than men with the same characteristics. (2019-03-25)
Small vessel disease MRI marker linked to worse cognitive health in older adults
Seemingly harmless fluid-filled spaces around the cerebral small vessels, commonly seen on brain MRIs in older adults, are now thought to be associated with more compromised cognitive skills, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Neurology. (2019-03-21)
Brain-inspired AI inspires insights about the brain (and vice versa)
In a paper presented at the 2018 Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS), researchers from The University of Texas at Austin described the results of experiments that used artificial neural networks to predict with greater accuracy than ever before how different areas in the brain respond to specific words. (2019-03-20)
Study shows IPCC is underselling climate change
A new study has revealed that the language used by the global climate change watchdog, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), is overly conservative - and therefore the threats are much greater than the Panel's reports suggest. (2019-03-19)
Research into aphasia reveals new interactions between language and thought
Knowledge of the facts is called factive knowledge. In the phrase 'He knows [that it is warm outside]', the embedded clause is assumed to be true. (2019-03-18)
Diet-induced changes favor innovation in speech sounds
Diet-induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as 'f' in languages all over the world, a study by an international team led by researchers at the University of Zurich has shown. (2019-03-14)
Infants' advances in speech processing play role in language-cognition link
A new Northwestern University study provides the first evidence that infants' increasingly precise perceptual tuning to the sounds of their native language sets constraints on the range of human languages they will link to cognition. (2019-03-13)
Taking arts classes leads to better academic performance, Mason research shows
A new study from the George Mason University Arts Research Center and published in the journal Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts found a link between arts elective courses in music, dance, visual art and drama, and better grades in middle school. (2019-03-12)
People track when talkers say 'uh' to predict what comes next
Speakers tend to say 'uh' before uncommon words ('uh... automobile') rather than common words ('car'). (2019-03-06)
Kids with cochlear implants since infancy more likely to speak, not sign
Researchers from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago present further evidence that deaf children who received cochlear implants (implanted electronic hearing device) before 12 months of age learn to more rapidly understand spoken language and are more likely to develop spoken language as their exclusive form of communication. (2019-03-05)
Alzheimer's treatment holds promise for primary progressive aphasia patients
Scientists have discovered that an existing therapy frequently used to treat Alzheimer's disease might also work on patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a type of dementia that destroys language and currently has no treatment. (2019-03-05)
When it comes to hearing words, it's a division of labor between our brain's two hemispheres
Scientists have uncovered a new 'division of labor' between our brain's two hemispheres in how we comprehend the words and other sounds we hear -- a finding that offers new insights into the processing of speech and points to ways to address auditory disorders. (2019-03-04)
How do we follow the rhythm of language? The answer depends on our brain's path
How is our speech shaped by what we hear? The answer varies, depending on the make-up of our brain's pathways, a team of neuroscientists has found. (2019-03-04)
The political power of 'the': A linguistic analysis
A new study of the English definite article 'the' demonstrates that even seemingly drab function words can send powerful social and political signals. (2019-03-04)
Brain processes concrete and abstract words differently
A new review explores the different areas of the brain that process the meaning of concrete and abstract concepts. (2019-02-28)
Honeybees' waggle dance no longer useful in some cultivated landscapes
For bees and other social insects, being able to exchange information is vital for the success of their colony. (2019-02-22)
Mandarin Chinese could help us understand how infants learn English
Infants may be more sensitive to non-native speech sounds than previously thought, according to a study published in the Journal of Memory and Language. (2019-02-20)
Artificial intelligence can identify trauma patients who misuse alcohol
A first-of-its kind study has demonstrated that an artificial intelligence technique can be used to identify trauma patients who misuse alcohol. (2019-02-20)
A shared past for East Africa's hunter-gatherers
Research led by University of Pennsylvania scientists offers a new look at African genetic diversity, with data from 50 populations. (2019-02-18)
Brain-computer interface, promise of restoring communication discussed at AAAS presentation
Choosing the 'right' brain-computer interface that maximizes reliability of the neural control signal and minimizes fatigue and frustration is critical. (2019-02-15)
The language of conversation impacts on the 'synchronization' of our brains
Experts from the Basque research center BCBL have shown for the first time that the way in which the activity of two brains is connected depends on whether the dialogue takes place in the native language or in a foreign language. (2019-02-14)
Pitch perfect: Strategic language use maximizes the chances of influencing an audience
Research finds four interconnected language strategies that entrepreneurs employ to best influence their audience. (2019-02-12)
Bias may affect providers' knowledge of transgender health
Transphobia rather than education predicts provider knowledge of transgender health care. (2019-02-11)
Learning a second alphabet for a first language
A part of the brain that maps letters to sounds can acquire a second, visually distinct alphabet for the same language, according to a study of English speakers published in eNeuro. (2019-02-11)
Trump's simple, confident language has strong historical roots
To many, President Donald Trump's use of nontraditional, off-the-cuff language seems unlike that of any other politician, but new research on the language of past and present world leaders reveals simple, straightforward messaging that exudes confidence may be the new norm -- making Trump a man of his time, rhetorically speaking. (2019-02-11)
'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to girls
Asking young girls to 'do science' leads them to show greater persistence in science activities than does asking them to 'be scientists,' finds a new psychology study by researchers at New York University and Princeton University. (2019-02-06)
Advocating for social issues at work more likely to succeed linking morality and mission, study says
When convincing management to consider advocating for a particular social issue, employees may think it is wise to focus on the benefits to the bottom line but making a moral argument may be a better strategy, as long as it aligns with the company's values, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-02-04)
The web meets genomics: a DNA search engine for microbes
Microbes are the most common and diverse organisms on the planet. (2019-02-04)
Word order predicts a native speakers' working memory
Memory plays a crucial role in our lives, and several studies have already investigated how we store and retrieve information under different conditions. (2019-02-04)
Peering under the hood of fake-news detectors
New work from MIT researchers peers under the hood of an automated fake-news detection system, revealing how machine-learning models catch subtle but consistent differences in the language of factual and false stories. (2019-02-04)
Learning new vocabulary during deep sleep
Researchers of the University of Bern, Switzerland, showed that we can acquire the vocabulary of a new language during distinct phases of slow-wave sleep and that the sleep-learned vocabulary could be retrieved unconsciously following waking. (2019-01-31)
Babies who hear two languages at home develop advantages in attention
In the study, infants who are exposed to more than one language show better attentional control than infants who are exposed to only one language. (2019-01-30)
Newborn babies have inbuilt ability to pick out words, finds study
A research study of newborn babies has revealed that humans are born with the innate skills needed to pick out words from language. (2019-01-29)
Newborn babies have inbuilt ability to pick out words, study finds
Newborn babies are born with the innate skills needed to pick out words from language, a new study published in Developmental Science reveals. (2019-01-29)
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