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Current Larvae News and Events

Current Larvae News and Events, Larvae News Articles.
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North Atlantic haddock use magnetic compass to guide them
A new study found that the larvae of haddock, a commercially important type of cod, have a magnetic compass to find their way at sea. (2019-09-17)
Burying beetle larvae know the best time to beg for food
It's easy to imagine an adult bird standing over youngsters with mouths open wide for a pre-mashed meal. (2019-09-11)
Ash tree species likely will survive emerald ash borer beetles, but just barely
'Lingering ash.' That's what the US Forest Service calls the relatively few green and white ash trees that survive the emerald ash borer onslaught. (2019-09-09)
Climate change water variability hurts salamander populations
New research from the University of Montana suggests that streamflow variability brought on by climate change will negatively affect the survival of salamanders. (2019-09-06)
Why fruit flies eat practically anything
Kyoto University researchers uncover why some organisms can eat anything -- 'generalists -- and others have strict diets -- 'specialists'. (2019-09-03)
Sexual selection influences the evolution of lamprey pheromones
In 'Intra- and Interspecific Variation in Production of Bile Acids that Act As Sex Pheromones in Lampreys,' published in Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, Tyler J. (2019-09-03)
Research Brief: New type of visual filter discovered in an unlikely place
A University of Minnesota-led research team recently discovered a new way animals can modify their vision. (2019-08-29)
How worms snare their hosts
Acanthocephala are parasitic worms that reproduce in the intestines of various animals, including fish. (2019-08-27)
Parasitic worms infect dogs, humans
A human infective nematode found in remote northern areas of Australia has been identified in canine carriers for the first time. (2019-08-26)
Mosquitoes push northern limits with time-capsule eggs to survive winters
Invasive mosquitoes at the northern limit of their current range are surviving conditions that are colder than those in their native territory. (2019-08-21)
Decades-old puzzle of the ecology of soil animals solved
An international research team led by the University of Goettingen has deciphered the defence mechanism of filamentous fungi. (2019-08-20)
Decoding the scent of a plant
A recent study led by Dr. Radhika Venkatesan has identified that herbivores are capable of decoding the scent of a plant and using these cues to brace up their immunity. (2019-08-16)
New information on tropical parasitoid insects revealed
The diversity and ecology of African parasitoid wasps was studied for over a year during a project run by the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland. (2019-08-14)
Asian longhorned beetle larvae eat plant tissues that their parents cannot
Despite the buzz in recent years about other invasive insects that pose an even larger threat to agriculture and trees -- such as the spotted lanternfly, the stink bug and the emerald ash borer -- Penn State researchers have continued to study another damaging pest, the Asian longhorned beetle. (2019-08-12)
When naproxen breaks down, toads croak
A new study in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry takes a harder look at the effects a common anti-inflammatory medication and its degradation products have on amphibians. (2019-08-12)
Leaping larvae! How do they do that without legs?
'Hydrostatic legless jumping' launches a 3-millimeter maggot of a goldenrod gall midge 20-30 body-lengths away with acceleration rivalling the best legged leapers. (2019-08-08)
The surprising merit of giant clam feces
Young giant clams get necessary symbiotic algae from the feces of their parents, updating the age-old adage: one clam's trash is another clam's treasure. (2019-08-07)
Knowing berry pests' varied diets may help control them
A Cornell University study, published in Ecological Entomology, investigates for the first time what spotted-wing drosophila adults and larvae eat, and where they lay their eggs, when these short-lived fruits are not in season. (2019-08-06)
Strange coral spawning improving Great Barrier Reef's resilience
A phenomenon that makes coral spawn more than once a year is improving the resilience of the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-08-06)
Climate change could shrink oyster habitat in California
Changes to dissolved oxygen levels, water temperature, and salinity could have an even greater impact than ocean acidification on oyster growth in estuaries and bays. (2019-08-06)
Caterpillars of the peppered moth perceive color through their skin
It is difficult to distinguish caterpillars of the peppered moth from a twig. (2019-08-02)
Decoding the complex life of a simple parasite
Scientists decode the genome sequence of one of nature's most complex parasites, dicyemids. (2019-07-29)
Parasitic bat flies offer window into lives of hosts
A new study on a Bahamian bat makes the case for using the species' unusual parasites to reveal details about the species' populations on the archipelago. (2019-07-29)
Garlic on broccoli: A smelly approach to repel a major pest
New University of Vermont study offers a novel framework to test strategies for managing invasive pests. (2019-07-23)
Boosting the discovery of new drugs to treat spinal cord injuries using zebrafish
A research team led by Leonor Saúde, Principal Investigator at Instituto de Medicina Molecular, in partnership with the company Technophage, SA, has designed a simple and efficient platform that uses zebrafish to discover and identify new drugs to treat spinal cord lesions. (2019-07-19)
Japanese scientists embrace creepy-crawlies
Firms in Japan are changing people's perceptions about common spiders, worms and insect larvae. (2019-07-17)
Effectiveness of using natural enemies to combat pests depends on surroundings
A new study of cabbage crops in New York -- a state industry worth close to $60 million in 2017, according to the USDA -- reports for the first time that the effectiveness of releasing natural enemies to combat pests depends on the landscape surrounding the field. (2019-07-15)
Dartmouth study finds that parental 'memory' is inherited across generations
A new study by Dartmouth researchers reveals that female fruit flies switch to ethanol-rich food when their eggs are threatened by predatory wasps, and that this adaptation is inherited across five generations of their offspring. (2019-07-09)
Coral reefs shifting away from equator
Coral reefs are retreating from equatorial waters and establishing new reefs in more temperate regions, according to new research in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. (2019-07-09)
The chemical language of plants depends on context
Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, studied the ecological function of linalool in Nicotiana attenuata tobacco plants. (2019-07-01)
Playing 'tag': Tracking movement of young oysters
A new publication in the journal Estuaries and Coasts investigates the use of a fluorescent dye to track movements of young oysters. (2019-06-24)
One third of Cambodians infected with threadworm, study finds
Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted threadworm that is endemic in many tropical and subtropical areas of the world. (2019-06-20)
New study maps how ocean currents connect the world's fisheries
It's a small world after all -- especially when it comes to marine fisheries, with a new study revealing they form a single network, with over $10 billion worth of fish each year being caught in a country other than the one in which it spawned. (2019-06-20)
For global fisheries, it's a small world after all
Even though many nations manage their fish stocks as if they were local resources, marine fisheries and fish populations are a single, highly interconnected and globally shared resource, a new study emphasizes. (2019-06-20)
Migratory hoverflies 'key' as many insects decline
Migratory hoverflies are 'key' to pollination and controlling crop pests amid the decline of many other insect species, new research shows. (2019-06-13)
Beewolves use a gas to preserve food
Scientists from the Universities of Regensburg and Mainz and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology discovered that the eggs of the European beewolf produce nitric oxide. (2019-06-11)
Drug to treat malaria could mitigate hereditary hearing loss
The ability to hear depends on proteins to reach the outer membrane of sensory cells in the inner ear. (2019-06-11)
Why Noah's ark won't work
Many species will need large population sizes to survive climate change and ocean acidification, a new study finds. (2019-06-11)
Toxic metals found in reproductive organs of critically endangered eels
European eels consume their own skeletons as they swim 6,000 kilometers to their spawning grounds. (2019-06-06)
A combination of agrochemicals shortens the life of bees, study shows
A nonlethal dose of insecticide clothianidin can reduce honeybees' life span by half; once combined with the fungicide pyraclostrobin, it alters the behavior of worker bees to the point of endangering the whole colony. (2019-05-30)
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