Current Livestock News and Events

Current Livestock News and Events, Livestock News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 23 | 916 Results
Restoration of degraded grasslands can benefit climate change mitigation and key ecosystem services
New research has demonstrated how, in contrast to encroachment by the invasive alien tree species Prosopis julifora (known as `Mathenge` -in Kenya or `Promi` in Baringo), restoration of grasslands in tropical semi-arid regions can both mitigate the impacts of climate change and restore key benefits usually provided by healthy grasslands for pastoralists and agro-pastoralist communities. (2020-11-24)

COVID-19 highlights risks of wildlife trade
Many diseases, such as COVID-19, made the jump from animals to people with serious consequences for the human host. International researchers, including Göttingen University, say that more epidemics resulting from animal hosts are inevitable unless urgent action is taken. To protect against future pandemics, they call for governments to establish effective legislation addressing wildlife trade, protection of habitats and reduction of interaction between people, wildlife and livestock. Their review appeared in Trends in Ecology & Evolution. (2020-11-17)

US agricultural water use declining for most crops and livestock production
Agricultural production and food manufacturing account for a third of water usage in the U.S. Water use fluctuates with weather patterns but is also affected by shifts in production technology, supply-chain linkages, and domestic and foreign consumer demand. A comprehensive University of Illinois study looked at water withdrawals in U.S. agriculture and food production from 1995 to 2010. The main trend was a decline in water use, driven by a combination of factors. (2020-11-16)

What does the fox say to a puma?
The two predator species can successfully share a landscape and hunt for food over the same nighttime hours because they are, in essence, ordering from different menus. (2020-11-13)

Global food system emissions threaten achievement of climate change targets
Even if greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel use in the global food system were immediately halted, the remaining greenhouse gasses otherwise produced from global food production would make meeting the Paris Agreement's target of limiting temperature increases to 1.5° Celsius (C) above preindustrial levels very difficult, a new study reports. (2020-11-05)

Researchers map genomes of agricultural monsters
The University of Cincinnati is unlocking the genomes of creepy agricultural pests like screwworms that feast on livestock from the inside out and thrips that transmit viruses to plants. (2020-10-28)

Waiter! This soup is not fly
Black Soldier Fly larvae contains more zinc and iron than lean meat and its calcium content is higher than milk. Less than half a hectare of black soldier fly larvae can produce more protein than cattle grazing on around 1200 hectares, or 52 hectares of soybeans. New research has identified the barriers for introducing fly protein into Western human diets as a sustainable, healthy alternative to both meat and plant proteins. (2020-10-28)

Strategic interventions in dairy production in developing countries can help meet growing global demand for milk
Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Livestock Systems hosted the ''MILK Symposium: Improving Milk Production, Quality, and Safety in Developing Countries'' at the 2019 American Dairy Science Association® Annual Meeting to address factors that cause low dairy consumption in low- and middle-income countries and discuss strategies to address them. The Journal of Dairy Science invited speakers to submit articles on topics from the symposium to reach a wider audience. (2020-10-15)

Sicker livestock may increase climate woes
Climate change is affecting the spread and severity of infectious diseases around the world -- and infectious diseases may in turn be contributing to climate change, according to a new paper in Trends in Ecology & Evolution. The research, led by Vanessa Ezenwa, a professor of ecology at the University of Georgia, and funded by the Living Earth Collaborative at Washington University in St. Louis, describes how parasites can cause animals to produce more methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. (2020-10-07)

N2O emissions pose an increasing climate threat, finds breakthrough study
Rising nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are jeopardizing the climate goals of the Paris Agreement, according to a major new study by an international team of scientists. The growing use of nitrogen fertilizers in the production of food worldwide is increasing atmospheric concentrations of N2O - a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide (CO2) that remains in the atmosphere for more than 100 years. (2020-10-07)

Scientists use 'genomic time travel' to discover new genetic traits to breed more productive and resilient African cattle
New study deploys advanced tools to retrace 1,000 years of African pastoralist cattle breeding, identifying traits to help cattle survive blistering heat, drought and advancing diseases. (2020-09-28)

Gene-edited livestock 'surrogate sires' successfully made fertile
For the first time, scientists have created pigs, goats and cattle that can serve as viable 'surrogate sires,' male animals that produce sperm carrying only the genetic traits of donor animals. The advance could speed the spread of desirable characteristics in livestock and improve food production for a growing global population. (2020-09-14)

Bat tick found for the first time in New Jersey
A tick species associated with bats has been reported for the first time in New Jersey and could pose health risks to people, pets and livestock, according to a Rutgers-led study in the Journal of Medical Entomology. This species (Carios kelleyi) is a ''soft'' tick. Deer ticks, which carry Lyme disease, are an example of ''hard'' ticks. (2020-09-09)

Gen Z not ready to eat lab-grown meat
New research by the University of Sydney and Curtin University that will be published on 8 September in Frontiers in Nutrition, found that, despite having a great concern for the environment and animal welfare, 72 percent of Generation Z were not ready to accept cultured meat - defined in the survey as a lab-grown meat alternative produced by in-vitro cell cultures of animal cells, instead of from slaughtered animals. (2020-09-07)

Farmers' quick sale of poultry during outbreaks may increase deadly virus transmission
Small-scale poultry farmers in Vietnam tend to respond to viral outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) by rapidly selling their birds as a way to avoid financial loss, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. As these birds are commingled with other birds in markets and trading networks, this practice may increase the likelihood of widespread disease transmission. (2020-08-28)

Genetics of the tree of life
The African baobab tree (Adansonia digitata) is called the tree of life. Baobab trees can live for more than a thousand years and provide food, livestock fodder, medicinal compounds, and raw materials. USDA scientists counted the significant tree's chromosomes - information critical for conservation, agricultural improvement, and further genetic work. Their findings were published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-08-27)

Reducing transmission risk of livestock disease
The risk of transmitting the livestock virus PPRV, which threatens 80% of the world's sheep and goats, increases with certain husbandry practices, including attendance at seasonal grazing camps and the introduction of livestock to the herd. (2020-08-24)

Improving protein digestibility in sorghum
Improving protein digestibility in sorghum (2020-08-19)

Lactobacillus hilgardii LMG 7934 genome deciphered at Kazan Federal University
The team is led by Associate Professor Ayrat Kayumov (Department of Genetics, Kazan Federal University). In this research, the scientists not only performed genome sequencing, but also found a completely new type of PII-Like Protein PotN. (2020-08-19)

Climate change mitigation not the primary motivator in regenerative ranching
Regenerative ranching, a holistic approach to managing grazing lands, enhances ranchers' adaptive capacity and socioeconomic well-being while also providing an opportunity to mitigate climate change. (2020-08-17)

Adding a meter between meals boosts vegetarian appeal -- study
Researchers have identified the optimal dish positions to help ''nudge'' diners into picking more planet-friendly meals in cafeterias. Findings are the latest from Cambridge research on encouraging dietary decision-making that supports sustainable living. (2020-08-13)

Texas A&M researchers developing first oral anthrax vaccine for livestock, wildlife
There may soon be a new weapon in the centuries-old battle against anthrax in wildlife thanks to groundbreaking work at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. (2020-08-11)

Research explores the impacts of mobile phones for Maasai women
For a population that herds livestock across wide stretches of wild savanna, mobile phones are a boon to their economy and life. But few studies have investigated how this new technology is impacting the lives of women in Maasai communities, which are traditionally patriarchal. In family units where men exert significant control, often over multiple wives, it is important to understand how phones have impacted gender dynamics. (2020-08-06)

Tiny plants crucial for sustaining dwindling water supplies: Global analysis
Miniscule plants growing on desert soils can help drylands retain water and reduce erosion, UNSW researchers have found. (2020-07-31)

A new method is developed to extract antibiotic residue in food from animal sources
The procedure simplifies and cheapens the process to extract coccidiostats, medicine used to treat an intestinal illness in animals but that can cause health risks for humans at high doses (2020-07-29)

Report provides new framework for understanding climate risks, impacts to US agriculture
A new USDA report focuses on how agricultural systems are impacted by climate change and offers a list of 20 indicators that provide a broad look at what's happening across the country. (2020-07-29)

Research suggests combating a pandemic is 500 times more expensive than preventing one
BU biologist and peers find investing in wildlife monitoring and deforestation could prevent costly pandemics. (2020-07-28)

Livestock expansion is a factor in global pandemics
The growth of global livestock farming is a threat to our biodiversity and also increases the health risks to both humans and domesticated animals. The patterns that link them are at the heart of a study published in Biological Conservation by a scientist from the Institute of Evolution Sciences of Montpellier (ISEM - CNRS/Université de Montpellier/IRD/EPHE) and the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development's (CIRAD) ASTRE laboratory. (2020-07-24)

UMD researcher highlights trends in consolidation of US agriculture with 35 years of data
In a new paper published in Applied Economics Perspectives and Policies, University of Maryland researcher Jim MacDonald presents a detailed history of the consolidation of agriculture in the US based on 35 years of data, with implications for all sectors of agriculture moving forward. Data show a steady shift to fewer and larger farming operations across crops, dairy, and livestock. (2020-07-23)

How much fluorine is too much fluorine?
Research investigates how fluorine levels affect beneficial soil microbes. (2020-07-15)

Parasite infestations revealed by tiny chicken backpacks
Blood-feeding livestock mites can be detected with wearable sensor technology nicknamed ''Fitbits for chickens.'' To help farmers detect mite infestations, a team of entomologists, computer scientists, and biologists led by UC Riverside entomologist Amy Murillo has created a new insect detection system. (2020-07-13)

Where did the Asian longhorned ticks in the US come from?
The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a Rutgers-led study. Asian longhorned ticks outside the U.S. can carry debilitating diseases. In the United States and elsewhere they can threaten livestock and pets. The new study, published in the journal Zoonoses and Public Health, sheds new light on the origin of these exotic ticks and how they are spreading across the United States. (2020-07-08)

Grassroots dog vaccinations can help stop rabies, but not alone
While scientists are trying to find a vaccine for COVID-19, the rabies virus continues to kill 59,000 people every year. But unlike COVID, a vaccine has existed for more than a century. Vaccinating dogs can stop the spread to humans, but systemic challenges make that easier said that done. In a new study, scientists where grassroots campaigns to stop rabies work-- and where they need to be coupled with large-scale efforts. (2020-07-02)

A novel sperm selection technology to increase success rates of in vitro fertilization
Motile sperm are difficult to collect with a conventional cell sorter because they are vulnerable to physical damage. A Japanese research collaboration has developed a technique using a cell sorter with microfluidic chip technology to reduce cell damage and improve in vitro fertilization rates. This research is expected to increase in vitro fertilization rates to improve production of experimental animals and livestock, and could be used as a fertility treatment in reproductive medicine. (2020-07-01)

SARS-CoV-2 transmission to animals: Monitoring needed to mitigate risk
As evidence mounts for the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 infecting various animals, scientists at UCL say a global effort is needed to reduce the risk of the virus later returning to people, in a comment piece published in The Lancet Microbe. (2020-06-18)

What has caused more extreme summer heat events over northeast Asia?
A new study found that anomalous anticyclone over Northeast Asia was responsible for nearly half of the magnitude in extreme heat events of 2018. (2020-06-15)

Soil biology research can help create a more sustainable future
Soil biodiversity should be incorporated into the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals and other global sustainability targets, researchers said. (2020-06-11)

23 years of water quality data from crop-livestock systems
Researchers summarize runoff water quantity and quality data from native tallgrass prairie and crop-livestock systems in Oklahoma between 1977 and 1999. (2020-06-09)

Invasive rushes spreading in upland farm fields
Scientists have used a series of Google Earth images to plot the spread of rushes in farm fields in the West Pennine Moor SSSI -- an area of the Lancashire uplands between Bolton, Bury and Darwen. Using more than 200 images from Google Earth taken across a 13-year period between 2005 and 2018, the researchers found that rushes have spread across the surveyed area by between 82 per cent and 174 per cent. (2020-06-09)

Simple way of 'listening' to chicks could dramatically improve welfare
New research led by the University of Plymouth suggests a simple and low-cost method of 'listening' to chicks may allow welfare issues to be picked up at the earliest possible opportunity. (2020-06-09)

Page 1 of 23 | 916 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.