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3D-printed corals provide more fertile ground for algae growth
Researchers have 3D-printed coral-inspired structures that are capable of growing dense populations of microscopic algae. (2020-04-09)
3D-printed corals could improve bioenergy and help coral reefs
Researchers have designed bionic 3D-printed corals that could help energy production and coral reef research. (2020-04-09)
Researchers successfully repair stroke-damaged rat brains
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have succeeded in restoring mobility and sensation of touch in stroke-afflicted rats by reprogramming human skin cells to become nerve cells, which were then transplanted into the rats' brains. (2020-04-08)
Virginia Tech scientists reveal brain tumors impact normally helpful cells
Unprovoked recurrent seizures are a serious problem affecting most patients who suffer from glioma, a primary brain tumor composed of malignant glial cells. (2020-04-06)
Ex­tra­cel­lu­lar forces help epi­thelial cells stick to­gether
Defects in the maintenance of the superficial tissue of the body, known as epithelial tissue, can help cancer cells achieve motility and metastasise. (2020-04-02)
Turning cells into computers with protein logic gates
New artificial proteins have been created to function as molecular logic gates. (2020-04-02)
Physical force alone spurs gene expression, study reveals
Cells will ramp up gene expression in response to physical forces alone, a new study finds. (2020-04-01)
'Living drug factories' might treat diabetes and other diseases
Chemical engineers have developed a way to protect transplanted drug-producing cells from immune system rejection. (2020-03-30)
Found in mistranslation
In a new study, scientists from Deepa Agashe's group at NCBS find that irrespective of which proteins are impacted, there is indeed a benefit to non-specific mistranslation. (2020-03-25)
Eye blinking on-a-chip
Researchers at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) have developed a device that moves fluids over corneal cells similarly to the movement of tears over a blinking eye. (2020-03-24)
Changes in surface sugarlike molecules help cancer metastasize
Changes in a specific type of sugarlike molecule, or glycan, on the surface of cancer cells help them to spread into other tissues, according to researchers at UC Davis. (2020-03-24)
Genetically engineering electroactive materials in living cells
Merging synthetic biology and materials science, researchers genetically coaxed specific populations of neurons to manufacture electronic-tissue 'composites' within the cellular architecture of a living animal, a new proof-of-concept report reveals. (2020-03-19)
Stanford scientists program cells to carry out gene-guided construction projects
The researchers developed a technique called genetically targeted chemical assembly, or GTCA, which they used to assemble electronically active biopolymer meshes on mammalian brain cells and on neurons in C. elegans. (2020-03-19)
Passport tagging for express cargo transportation in cells
The collaborative research groups identified a 10-amino acid sequence, which is built in blood coagulation factors, that is specifically recognized as a passport for their intracellular transportation in the secretory pathway. (2020-03-17)
Selective killing of cancer cells by cluttering their waste disposal system
Mixed-charge nanoparticles assemble into crystals and cause the death of thirteen types of cancer lines. (2020-03-16)
How skin cells embark on a swift yet elaborate death
Scientists have identified the mechanism that allows skin cells to sense changes in their environment, and very quickly respond to reinforce the skin's outermost layer. (2020-03-13)
Careless cancer cells may be susceptible to future drugs
Could the ability of cancer cells to quickly alter their genome be used as a weapon against malignant tumors? (2020-03-11)
Causes of loneliness differ between generations, research says
People of different generations are equally lonely but for different reasons, a study suggests. (2020-03-11)
Stanford scientists discover the mathematical rules underpinning brain growth
'How do cells with complementary functions arrange themselves to construct a functioning tissue?' said study co-author Bo Wang, an assistant professor of Bioengineering. (2020-03-11)
Scientists propose nanoparticles that can treat cancer with magnetic fluid hyperthermia
A group of Russian scientists have synthesized manganese-zinc ferrite nanoparticles that can potentially be used in cancer treatment. (2020-03-06)
Machine sucks up tiny tissue spheroids and prints them precisely
A new method of bioprinting uses aspiration of tiny biologics such as spheroids, cells and tissue strands, to precisely place them in 3D patterns either on scaffolding or without to create artificial tissues with natural properties, according to Penn State researchers. (2020-03-06)
Same genes, same conditions, different transport
The bacterium Lactococcus lactis is unable to produce the amino acid methionine and has to rely on uptake from the environment, using systems with high or low affinity. (2020-03-05)
Microbiome species interactions reveal how bacteria collaborate to cheat death
When a doctor prescribes antibiotics, it sets up a multi-faceted experiment in your gastrointestinal system. (2020-03-05)
UConn researchers discover new stem cells that can generate new bone
A population of stem cells with the ability to generate new bone has been newly discovered by a group of researchers at the UConn School of Dental Medicine. (2020-03-05)
Images of 'invisible' holes on cells may jumpstart research
Cellular pores, which were once invisible to biologists, have been imaged for the first time. (2020-03-03)
DNA discovery can lead to new types of cancer drugs
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered that our cells replicate their DNA much more loosely than previously thought. (2020-02-28)
'Make two out of one' -- division of artificial cells
Max Planck scientists uncover a novel and generic mechanism for the division of artificial cells into two daughter cells. (2020-02-24)
New discovery has important implications for treating common eye disease
Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have made an important discovery with implications for those living with a common, debilitating eye disease (age-related macular degeneration, AMD) that can cause blindness. (2020-02-20)
Random gene pulsing generates patterns of life
Scientists working on the intersection between biology and computation have found that random gene activity helps patterns form during development of a model multicellular system. (2020-02-19)
People living with HIV diagnosed with COPD 12 years younger than HIV-negative people
Researchers analyzed incidences of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among adults 35 years and older who were living with and without HIV between 1996 and 2015 in Ontario - where over 40 per cent of Canadians living with HIV reside. (2020-02-18)
Unexpected insights into the dynamic structure of mitochondria
As power plants and energy stores, mitochondria are essential components of almost all cells in plants, fungi and animals. (2020-02-18)
New UCL technology analyses single cancer cells in lab grown tumours
New technology developed at UCL is, for the first time, enabling cancer scientists to analyse the individual behaviour of millions of different cells living inside lab-grown tumours -- a breakthrough which could lead to new personalised cancer treatments. (2020-02-17)
Controlling the messenger with blue light
IBS scientists have developed a new optogenetic tool to visualize and control the position of specific messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules inside living cells. (2020-02-17)
Leaking away essential resources isn't wasteful, actually helps cells grow
Experts have been unable to explain why cells from bacteria to humans leak essential chemicals necessary for growth into their environment. (2020-02-14)
Molecule offers hope for halting Parkinson's
A promising molecule has offered hope for a new treatment that could stop or slow Parkinson's, something no treatment can currently do. (2020-02-14)
Huge bacteria-eating viruses found in DNA from gut of pregnant women and Tibetan hot spring
University of Melbourne and the University of California, Berkeley, scientists have discovered hundreds of unusually large, bacteria-killing viruses with capabilities normally associated with living organisms. (2020-02-13)
Mapping the future direction for bioprinting research
The way research in bioprinting will be taken forward has been laid out in a roadmap for the field. (2020-02-07)
End-of life-care needs will nearly double over the next 30 years, highlighting urgent need for funding
New research at Trinity College Dublin highlights that end-of-life care needs will nearly double over the next 30 years, highlighting urgent need for funding and workforce. (2020-02-06)
Words matter when it comes to apparel for people living with disabilitie
Brands should consider the language they use when marketing products to this group of consumers, according to a new study from the University of Missouri. (2020-02-06)
iPS cells to regulate immune rejection upon transplantation
Scientists suggest a new strategy that uses induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to regulate immune reaction to transplanted tissues. (2020-02-06)
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