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Roads and deforestation explode in the Congo basin
Logging roads are expanding dramatically in the Congo Basin, leading to catastrophic collapses in animal populations living in the world's second-largest rainforest, according to research co-led by a scientist at James Cook University in Australia. (2019-06-24)
How you lock your smartphone can reveal your age: UBC study
Older smartphone users tend to rely more on their phones' auto lock feature compared to younger users, a new UBC study has found. (2019-06-20)
Monitoring biodiversity with sound: How machines can enrich our knowledge
For a long time, ecologists have relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. (2019-06-18)
Working landscapes can support diverse bird species
Privately-owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (2019-06-05)
Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests
A meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies of soil biodiversity in Amazonian forests found that the abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of soil fauna and microbes were reduced following deforestation. (2019-05-24)
Hunting responsible for mammal declines in half of intact tropical forests
Defaunation -- the loss of species or decline of animal populations -- is reaching even the most remote and pristine tropical forests. (2019-05-14)
Scientists estimate: Half of tropical forests under hunting pressure
Over half of the tropical forests is under hunting pressure. (2019-05-14)
Freshwater fish species richness has increased in Ohio River Basin since '60s
The taxonomic and trophic composition of freshwater fishes in the Ohio River Basin has changed significantly in recent decades, possibly due to environmental modifications related to land use and hydrology, according to a study published April 24 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mark Pyron of Ball State University, and colleagues. (2019-04-24)
Global centers of unsustainable harvesting of species identified
Unsustainable harvesting, including hunting, trapping, fishing and logging, is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity. (2019-04-03)
Low-cost and energy efficient recording of biodiversity soundscapes
An international team of researchers has built a new sensor network that can monitor two crucial activities, namely biodiversity, or the variety of life, in a particular habitat or ecosystem, and identification of possible illegal activities such as logging or poaching in protected areas. (2019-03-21)
Modern mahouts taking care of elephants in Myanmar are younger and less experienced
Traditional elephant handling worldwide is rapidly changing. Researchers discovered that mahouts in Myanmar are only 22 years old on average, with an average experience of three years working with elephants, and they are changing elephants yearly preventing the development of long-term bonds between elephants and mahouts. (2019-02-11)
Tree loss from bark-beetle infestation impacts elk habitat
Although elk typically adapt to forest disturbances such as forest fires and logging, a new Journal of Wildlife Management study found that during the summer, elk avoided areas with extensive tree mortality that has occurred due to the bark-beetle epidemic in the northern portions of the Rocky Mountains in the United States. (2019-02-06)
Palm oil not the only driver of forest loss in Indonesia
Large-scale agriculture, primarily for growing oil palms, remains a major cause of deforestation in Indonesia but its impact has diminished in recent years as other natural and human causes emerge, a Duke University study finds. (2019-02-01)
Forest soils need many decades to recover from fires and logging
A landmark study from The Australian National University has found that forest soils need several decades to recover from bushfires and logging -- much longer than previously thought. (2019-01-22)
Study shows how vultures evesdrop to gather vital flight information
A new study has shown vultures use their very own social networks to take advantage of thermal updrafts which help them fly vast distances. (2018-11-07)
Climate change causing more severe wildfires, larger insect outbreaks in temperate forests
A warmer, drier climate is expected is increase the likelihood of larger-scale forest disturbances such as wildfires, insect outbreaks, disease and drought, according to a new study co-authored by a Portland State University professor (2018-11-07)
Salvage logging, planting not necessary to regenerate Douglas firs after Klamath fires
Researchers at Portland State University and Oregon State University looking at the aftermath of wildfires in southwestern Oregon and northern California found that after 20 years, even in severely burned areas, Douglas fir grew back on its own without the need for salvage logging and replanting (2018-10-31)
Crowd-sourced data wins protection for endangered tricolored blackbird
Cornell University Lab of Ornithology fellow Orin Robinson used eBird data to convince California to list the Tricolored Blackbird as endangered. (2018-10-09)
Once majestic Atlantic Forest 'empty' after 500 years of over-exploitation
New research finds that 500 years of over-exploitation has halved mammal populations in South America's once majestic Atlantic Forest. (2018-09-25)
Diverse forests are stronger against drought
In a paper published in Nature, researchers including University of Utah biologist William Anderegg report that forests with trees that employ a high diversity of traits related to water use suffer less of an impact from drought. (2018-09-19)
When a tree lost is, or isn't, permanent deforestation: Mapping global forest loss
Despite numerous efforts by international governments, corporations and conservationists to reduce it, the overall rate of a permanent type of forest loss known as commodity-driven forest loss has not changed since 2001, a new map-based study reports. (2018-09-13)
Do you know why and how you forget passwords?
Do you frequently forget passwords to a baffling array of accounts and websites? (2018-09-06)
Carbon emissions in African savannas triple previous estimates
Widespread tree felling in African savannas is producing at least three times as many carbon emissions as was previously thought, research suggests. (2018-08-24)
Logging permit fraud threatens timber species in Brazilian Amazon
Timber harvested illegally under fraudulent permits is undercutting conservation efforts in the Brazilian Amazon, new research by an international collaboration shows. (2018-08-15)
Wildfire management designed to protect Spotted Owls may be outdated
According to a new study, forest fires are not a serious threat to populations of Spotted Owls, a species that acts as an indicator of biological health to the old-growth forests where they live. (2018-07-24)
New map shows many old-growth forests remain In Europe
A first-of-its-kind map identifies more than 3.4 million acres of old-growth forests in 34 European countries -- considerably more than previously understood. (2018-05-25)
Whole-tree logging may not hinder plant biodiversity
When it comes to timber harvesting, removing the whole tree -- from stump to twigs -- doesn't reduce plant diversity any more than old-fashioned logging, which leaves tree branches behind in the woods. (2018-05-16)
World's rarest ape on the edge of extinction
In a new research article, a team of international researchers argue that the Tapanuli orangutan -- a species discovered last year in Sumatra, Indonesia, and one of the rarest animals on the planet -- could lose its battle for survival, unless decisive steps are taken to rescue it. (2018-05-03)
Small changes in rainforests cause big damage to fish ecosystems
Using lasers, researchers have connected, arranged and merged artificial cells, paving the way for networks of artificial cells acting as tissues. (2018-04-19)
Logging in tropical forests jeopardizing drinking water
A team of researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and other groups have found that increasing land clearing for logging in Solomon Islands-even with best management strategies in place -- will lead to unsustainable levels of soil erosion and significant impacts to downstream water quality. (2018-04-16)
Your wood stove affects the climate more than you might think
Heating with wood has a significant warming effect on the climate, which is cause for concern. (2018-04-03)
Salvage logging is often a pretext for harvesting wood
An increasing proportion of the world's protected forests are subject to extensive logging activities. (2018-03-27)
Jaguars and well-managed logging concessions can coexist, say conservationists
Logging activities in biodiverse forests can have a huge negative impact on wildlife, particularly large species such as big cats, but a new study proves that the Western Hemisphere's largest cat species--the jaguar (Panthera onca)--can do well in logging concessions that are properly managed, according to conservationists from the San Diego Zoo Global and the Bronx Zoo-based WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society). (2018-03-22)
The changing voices of North Atlantic right whales
Researchers have found that right whale calls, much like human voices, change as individuals age. (2018-03-12)
Payments to protect carbon stored in forests must increase to defend against rubber
Efforts to protect tropical forests in Southeast Asia for the carbon they store may fail because protection payments are too low. (2018-03-02)
Fixing damaged ecosystems: How much does restoration help?
Billions of dollars are spent annually on repairing ecosystems damaged by people. (2018-03-01)
In 16 years, Borneo lost more than 100,000 orangutans
Over a 16-year period, about half of the orangutans living on the island of Borneo were lost as a result of changes in land cover. (2018-02-15)
New hope for critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey
Scientists and conservation teams from Fauna & Flora International (FFI), Dali University and the German Primate Center just published a comprehensive conservation status review of one of the world's most threatened primate species, the critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey (also known affectionately as the 'snubby' by scientists, and as the black snub-nosed monkey in China), Rhinopithecus strykeri. (2018-01-16)
Decades-past logging still threatens spotted owls in national forests
Logging of the largest trees in the Sierra Nevada's national forests ended in the early 1990s after agreements were struck to protect species' habitat. (2017-12-06)
Forests are the key to fresh water
Freshwater resources are critical to both human civilization and natural ecosystems, but UBC researchers have discovered that changes to ground vegetation can have as much of an impact on global water resources as climate change. (2017-12-06)
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