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Amazon forest disturbance is changing how plants are dispersed
New research finds tropical forest disturbance goes beyond species loss and includes a shift towards smaller seeds and an increase in the proportion of trees dispersed by animals, impacting how the ecosystem functions. (2020-02-18)
Response to fire impacts water levels 40 years into future
Salvage logging and re-seeding a forest after a wildfire helps reduce flooding and returns water levels to normal faster, according to a new paper from a Washington State University researcher. (2020-01-09)
Animals that evolved in low-disturbance areas more 'sensitive' to modern disruption
Animal species that have evolved, and survived, in low-disturbance environments -- with little interruption from glaciation, fires, hurricanes, or anthropogenic clearing -- are more sensitive to modern forest fragmentation, report Matthew Betts and colleagues. (2019-12-05)
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research. (2019-12-05)
First operational mapping system for high-resolution tropical forest carbon emissions created using
For the first time, scientists have developed a method to monitor carbon emissions from tropical forests at an unprecedented level of detail. (2019-11-28)
Quitting Facebook could boost exam results
In research that validates what many parents and educators suspect, students whose grades are below average could boost their exam results if they devoted less time to Facebook and other social networking sites. (2019-11-11)
In Southeast Asia, illegal hunting is a more threat to wildlife than forest degradation
A new study carried out by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in cooperation with the World Wide Fund for Nature Vietnam (WWF-Vietnam) and the Sabah Forestry Department of the Government of Malaysia suggests that for ground dwelling mammal and bird communities, illegal hunting using indiscriminate snares may be a more immediate threat than forest degradation through selective logging. (2019-10-30)
Carbon bomb: Study says climate impact from loss of intact tropical forests grossly underreported
A new study in the journal Science Advances says that carbon impacts from the loss of intact tropical forests has been grossly underreported. (2019-10-30)
Intact forest loss 'six times worse' for climate
The impact of losing intact tropical forests is more devastating on the climate than previously thought, according to University of Queensland-led research. (2019-10-30)
The private lives of sharks
White sharks are top predators in the marine environment, but unlike their terrestrial counterparts, very little is known about their predatory activity underwater, with current knowledge limited to surface predation events. (2019-10-01)
Plants could remove six years of carbon dioxide emissions -- if we protect them
By analysing 138 experiments, researchers have mapped the potential of today's plants and trees to store extra carbon by the end of the century. (2019-08-20)
Whole-tree harvesting could boost biomass production
Making the shift to renewable energy sources requires biomass, too. (2019-07-29)
Study reveals unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest
Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon. (2019-07-18)
Study documents impacts of selective logging on Congo's intact forest landscapes
A new study says that the tropical forests of Western Equatorial Africa (WEA) -- which include significant stands of Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) -- are increasingly coming under pressure from logging, poaching, and associated disturbances. (2019-07-15)
Roads and deforestation explode in the Congo basin
Logging roads are expanding dramatically in the Congo Basin, leading to catastrophic collapses in animal populations living in the world's second-largest rainforest, according to research co-led by a scientist at James Cook University in Australia. (2019-06-24)
How you lock your smartphone can reveal your age: UBC study
Older smartphone users tend to rely more on their phones' auto lock feature compared to younger users, a new UBC study has found. (2019-06-20)
Monitoring biodiversity with sound: How machines can enrich our knowledge
For a long time, ecologists have relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. (2019-06-18)
Working landscapes can support diverse bird species
Privately-owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (2019-06-05)
Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests
A meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies of soil biodiversity in Amazonian forests found that the abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of soil fauna and microbes were reduced following deforestation. (2019-05-24)
Hunting responsible for mammal declines in half of intact tropical forests
Defaunation -- the loss of species or decline of animal populations -- is reaching even the most remote and pristine tropical forests. (2019-05-14)
Scientists estimate: Half of tropical forests under hunting pressure
Over half of the tropical forests is under hunting pressure. (2019-05-14)
Freshwater fish species richness has increased in Ohio River Basin since '60s
The taxonomic and trophic composition of freshwater fishes in the Ohio River Basin has changed significantly in recent decades, possibly due to environmental modifications related to land use and hydrology, according to a study published April 24 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mark Pyron of Ball State University, and colleagues. (2019-04-24)
Global centers of unsustainable harvesting of species identified
Unsustainable harvesting, including hunting, trapping, fishing and logging, is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity. (2019-04-03)
Low-cost and energy efficient recording of biodiversity soundscapes
An international team of researchers has built a new sensor network that can monitor two crucial activities, namely biodiversity, or the variety of life, in a particular habitat or ecosystem, and identification of possible illegal activities such as logging or poaching in protected areas. (2019-03-21)
Modern mahouts taking care of elephants in Myanmar are younger and less experienced
Traditional elephant handling worldwide is rapidly changing. Researchers discovered that mahouts in Myanmar are only 22 years old on average, with an average experience of three years working with elephants, and they are changing elephants yearly preventing the development of long-term bonds between elephants and mahouts. (2019-02-11)
Tree loss from bark-beetle infestation impacts elk habitat
Although elk typically adapt to forest disturbances such as forest fires and logging, a new Journal of Wildlife Management study found that during the summer, elk avoided areas with extensive tree mortality that has occurred due to the bark-beetle epidemic in the northern portions of the Rocky Mountains in the United States. (2019-02-06)
Palm oil not the only driver of forest loss in Indonesia
Large-scale agriculture, primarily for growing oil palms, remains a major cause of deforestation in Indonesia but its impact has diminished in recent years as other natural and human causes emerge, a Duke University study finds. (2019-02-01)
Forest soils need many decades to recover from fires and logging
A landmark study from The Australian National University has found that forest soils need several decades to recover from bushfires and logging -- much longer than previously thought. (2019-01-22)
Study shows how vultures evesdrop to gather vital flight information
A new study has shown vultures use their very own social networks to take advantage of thermal updrafts which help them fly vast distances. (2018-11-07)
Climate change causing more severe wildfires, larger insect outbreaks in temperate forests
A warmer, drier climate is expected is increase the likelihood of larger-scale forest disturbances such as wildfires, insect outbreaks, disease and drought, according to a new study co-authored by a Portland State University professor (2018-11-07)
Salvage logging, planting not necessary to regenerate Douglas firs after Klamath fires
Researchers at Portland State University and Oregon State University looking at the aftermath of wildfires in southwestern Oregon and northern California found that after 20 years, even in severely burned areas, Douglas fir grew back on its own without the need for salvage logging and replanting (2018-10-31)
Crowd-sourced data wins protection for endangered tricolored blackbird
Cornell University Lab of Ornithology fellow Orin Robinson used eBird data to convince California to list the Tricolored Blackbird as endangered. (2018-10-09)
Once majestic Atlantic Forest 'empty' after 500 years of over-exploitation
New research finds that 500 years of over-exploitation has halved mammal populations in South America's once majestic Atlantic Forest. (2018-09-25)
Diverse forests are stronger against drought
In a paper published in Nature, researchers including University of Utah biologist William Anderegg report that forests with trees that employ a high diversity of traits related to water use suffer less of an impact from drought. (2018-09-19)
When a tree lost is, or isn't, permanent deforestation: Mapping global forest loss
Despite numerous efforts by international governments, corporations and conservationists to reduce it, the overall rate of a permanent type of forest loss known as commodity-driven forest loss has not changed since 2001, a new map-based study reports. (2018-09-13)
Do you know why and how you forget passwords?
Do you frequently forget passwords to a baffling array of accounts and websites? (2018-09-06)
Carbon emissions in African savannas triple previous estimates
Widespread tree felling in African savannas is producing at least three times as many carbon emissions as was previously thought, research suggests. (2018-08-24)
Logging permit fraud threatens timber species in Brazilian Amazon
Timber harvested illegally under fraudulent permits is undercutting conservation efforts in the Brazilian Amazon, new research by an international collaboration shows. (2018-08-15)
Wildfire management designed to protect Spotted Owls may be outdated
According to a new study, forest fires are not a serious threat to populations of Spotted Owls, a species that acts as an indicator of biological health to the old-growth forests where they live. (2018-07-24)
New map shows many old-growth forests remain In Europe
A first-of-its-kind map identifies more than 3.4 million acres of old-growth forests in 34 European countries -- considerably more than previously understood. (2018-05-25)
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