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Current Lunar surface News and Events, Lunar surface News Articles.
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China's control measures may have prevented 700,000 COVID-19 cases
China's control measures during the first 50 days of the COVID-19 epidemic may have delayed the spread of the virus to cities outside of Wuhan by several days and prevented more than 700,000 infections nationwide, according to an international team of researchers. (2020-03-31)
A Martian mash up: Meteorites tell story of Mars' water history
University of Arizona researchers probed Martian meteorites to reconstruct Mars' chaotic history. (2020-03-30)
Unique structural fluctuations at ice surface promote autoionization of water molecules
Hydrated protons at the surface of water ice are of fundamental importance in a variety of physicochemical phenomena on earth and in the universe. (2020-03-30)
Why does your cotton towel get stiff after natural drying?
The remaining 'bound water' on cotton surfaces cross-link single fibers of cotton, causing hardening after natural drying, according to a new study conducted by Kao Corporation and Hokkaido University. (2020-03-27)
Astronaut urine to build moon bases
The modules that the major space agencies plan to erect on the Moon could incorporate an element contributed by the human colonizers themselves: the urea in their pee. (2020-03-27)
The Lancet Public Health: Modelling study estimates impact of physical distancing measures on progression of COVID-19 epidemic in Wuhan
New modelling research, published in The Lancet Public Health journal, suggests that school and workplace closures in Wuhan, China have reduced the number of COVID-19 cases and substantially delayed the epidemic peak -- giving the health system the time and opportunity to expand and respond. (2020-03-25)
Hayabusa2's big 'impact' on understanding asteroid Ryugu's age and surface cohesion
After an explosive device on the Hayabusa2 spacecraft fired a copper cannonball a bit larger than a tennis ball into the near-Earth asteroid Ryugu, creating an artificial impact crater on it, researchers understand more about the asteroid's age and composition, they say. (2020-03-19)
Symmetry-enforced three-dimension Dirac phononic crystals
Dirac semimetals are critical states of topologically distinct phases. Such gapless topological states have been accomplished by a band-inversion mechanism, in which the Dirac points can be annihilated pairwise by perturbations without changing the symmetry of the system. (2020-03-19)
New experimental, theoretical evidence identifies jacutingaite as dual-topology insulator
New collaborative work involving NCCR MARVEL researchers has given additional insight into the nature of jacutingaite (Pt2HgSe3), a species of platinum-group mineral first discovered in a Brazilian mine in 2008. (2020-03-15)
Mercury's 400 C heat may help it make its own ice
Despite Mercury's 400 C daytime heat, there is ice at its caps, and now a study shows how that Vulcan scorch probably helps the planet closest to the sun make some of that ice. (2020-03-13)
Ammonium salts reveal reservoir of 'missing' nitrogen in comets
Substantial amounts of ammonium salts have been identified in the surface material of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, researchers report, likely revealing the reservoir of nitrogen that was previously thought to be 'missing' in comets. (2020-03-12)
APS tip sheet: Understanding the tears of wine
New research explores the fluid dynamics behind a phenomenon known as tears of wine (2020-03-10)
UNM scientists find Earth and Moon not identical oxygen twins
Scientists at The University of New Mexico have found that the Earth and Moon have distinct oxygen compositions and are not identical in oxygen as previously thought according to a new study released today in Nature Geoscience. (2020-03-10)
Leaf-inspired surface prevents frost formation
By tweaking the texture of any material's surface, researchers experimentally reduced frost formation by up to 60%. (2020-03-10)
Tadpoles break the tension with bubble-sucking
When it comes to the smallest of creatures, the hydrogen bonds that hold water molecules together to form 'surface tension' lend enough strength to support their mass: think of insects that skip across the surface of water. (2020-02-26)
Digging into the far side of the moon: Chang'E-4 probes 40 meters into lunar surface
A little over a year after landing, China's spacecraft Chang'E-4 is continuing to unveil secrets from the far side of the Moon. (2020-02-26)
Observation of non-trivial superconductivity on surface of type II Weyl semimetal TaIrTe4
The search for unconventional superconductivity in Weyl semimetal materials is currently an exciting pursuit, since such superconducting phases could potentially be topologically non-trivial and host exotic Majorana modes. (2020-02-25)
Living cell imaging technique sheds light on molecular view of obesity
Researchers have developed novel probes to track cellular events that can lead to obesity. (2020-02-24)
Journey to the center of Mars
While InSight's seismometer has been patiently waiting for the next big marsquake to illuminate its interior and define its crust-mantle-core structure, two scientists, have built a new compositional model for Mars. (2020-02-19)
The origins of roughness
A Freiburg researcher investigates the origins of surface texture. (2020-02-17)
Our memory prefers essence over form
What clues does our memory use to connect a current situation to a situation from the past? (2020-02-14)
Capillary shrinkage triggers high-density porous structure
The capillary shrinkage of graphene oxide hydrogels was investigated to illustrate the relationship between the surface tension of the evaporating solvent and the associated capillary force, which was released by Quan-Hong Yang et al. in Science China Materials. (2020-02-13)
A close-up of Arrokoth reveals how planetary building blocks were constructed
The farthest, most primitive object in the Solar System ever to be visited by a spacecraft - a bi-lobed Kuiper Belt Object known as Arrokoth -- is described in detail in three new reports. (2020-02-13)
mystery solved: Why ocean's carbon budget plummets beyond the twilight zone
Helping fill a gap in the understanding of the biological carbon pump -- a major climate regulator -- a new study shows that fragmentation of large organic particles into small ones accounts for roughly half of particle loss in the ocean, making it perhaps the most important process controlling the sequestration of sinking organic carbon in the oceans. (2020-02-13)
Study examines the impact of oil contaminated water on tubeworms and brittlestars
A new study published by Dauphin Island Sea Lab researchers adds a new layer to understanding how an oil spill could impact marine life. (2020-02-10)
One small grain of moon dust, one giant leap for lunar studies
Scientists have found a new way to analyze the chemistry of the moon's soil using a single grain of dust brought back by Apollo 17 astronauts in 1972. (2020-02-07)
Authentic behavior at work leads to greater productivity, study shows
Matching behavior with the way you feel -- in other words, not faking it -- is more productive at work and leads to other benefits, according to a new study co-authored by Chris Rosen, management professor in the Sam M. (2020-02-03)
New research could aid cleaner energy technologies
New research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, could aid cleaner energy technologies. (2020-01-30)
Study analyses potential global spread of new coronavirus
Experts in population mapping at the University of Southampton have identified cities and provinces within mainland China, and cities and countries worldwide, which are at high-risk from the spread of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV). (2020-01-28)
New understanding of condensation could lead to better power plant condenser, de-icing materials
For decades, it's been understood that water repellency is needed for surfaces to shed condensation buildup - like the droplets of water that form in power plant condensers to reduce pressure. (2020-01-23)
Status report: OSIRIS-REx completes closest flyover of sample site nightingale
OSIRIS-REx successfully executed a 0.4-mile (620-m) flyover of site Nightingale yesterday as part of the mission's Reconnaissance B phase activities. (2020-01-22)
The secret of strong underwater mussel adhesion revealed
Hyung Joon Cha and his research team identified a mechanism of adhesive proteins in a mussel that controls the surface adhesion and cohesion. (2020-01-22)
Molecules move faster on a rough terrain
Contrary to what one might think, molecules can move faster in the proximity of rougher surfaces. (2020-01-17)
The mysterious movement of water molecules
Water is all around us and essential for life. Nevertheless, research into its behaviour at the atomic level -- above all how it interacts with surfaces -- is thin on the ground. (2020-01-15)
Voltage induced 'Super-fluid like' penetration effects in Liquid metals at room temperature
Researchers from the University of Wollongong, Australia, have made the startling discovery that a room-temperature liquid metals show a ''superfluid-like'' effect of passing through porous materials. (2020-01-14)
Engineers develop 'chameleon metals' that change surfaces in response to heat
Martin Thuo and his research group have found a way to use heat to predictably and precisely change the surface structure of a particle of liquid metal. (2020-01-13)
Influential electrons? Physicists uncover a quantum relationship
A team of physicists has mapped how electron energies vary from region to region in a particular quantum state with unprecedented clarity. (2020-01-13)
Cracks in Arctic sea ice turn low clouds on and off
The prevailing view has been that more leads are associated with more low-level clouds during winter. (2020-01-10)
China's inland surface water quality significantly improves
A new study shows that China's inland surface water quality improved significantly from 2003-2017, coinciding with major efforts beginning in 2001 to reduce water pollution in the country. (2020-01-03)
Development of ultrathin durable membrane for efficient oil and water separation
Researchers led by Professor MATSUYAMA Hideto and Professor YOSHIOKA Tomohisa at Kobe University's Research Center for Membrane and Film Technology have succeeded in developing an ultrathin membrane with a fouling-resistant silica surface treatment for high performance separation of oil from water. (2019-12-26)
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