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Current Macular degeneration News and Events

Current Macular degeneration News and Events, Macular degeneration News Articles.
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New cell models for ocular drug discovery
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed two new cell models that can open up new avenues for ocular drug discovery. (2019-12-04)
Neurodegenerative diseases may be caused by transportation failures inside neurons
Protein clumps are routinely found in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. (2019-12-03)
To see the invisible
Scientists are curious by nature and often look where they should not. (2019-11-29)
Helper protein worsens diabetic eye disease
In a recent study using mice, lab-grown human retinal cells and patient samples, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they found evidence of a new pathway that may contribute to degeneration of the light sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. (2019-11-27)
Most shoppers unaware of major risk factor for most common form of glaucoma in UK
New study suggests that less than a fifth of shoppers were aware of the need for tests of the pressure inside their eyes (intraocular pressure), when measured at a Pop-Up health check station set up across eight shopping centers in England. (2019-11-27)
KBRI team reduces neurodegeneration associated with dementia in animal models
Korean research team made up of Dr. Hyung-Jun Kim and Shinrye Lee of KBRI, and professor Kiyoung Kim of Soonchunhyang University, found a new molecular mechanism of suppressing neuronal toxicity associateded dementia and Lou Gehrig's disease. (2019-11-26)
Study paves way to better understanding, treatment of arthritis
Oregon State University research has provided the first complete, cellular-level look at what's going on in joints afflicted by osteoarthritis, a debilitating and costly condition that affects nearly one-quarter of adults in the United States. (2019-11-25)
Heating techniques could improve treatment of macular degeneration
Age-related macular degeneration is the primary cause of central vision loss and results in the center of the visual field being blurred or fully blacked out. (2019-11-23)
Researchers discover molecular light switch in photoreceptor cells
Transducin, a protein found inside photoreceptor cells in vertebrate eyes, alters its cellular location in response to changes in light intensity, allowing our eyes to adapt to the changes. (2019-11-20)
Treatments for leading cause of blindness generate $0.9 to $3 billion
A new economic study, published in JAMA Ophthalmology and conducted by USC researchers at the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & Economics, the Ginsburg Institute for Biomedical Therapeutics, and the Roski Eye Institute, quantifies the benefits of treatment for wAMD. (2019-11-14)
Better biosensor technology created for stem cells
A Rutgers-led team has created better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and other neurological disorders. (2019-11-11)
LSU Health research discovers potential new Rx target for AMD and Alzheimer's
Research led by Nicolas Bazan, M.D., Ph.D., Boyd Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, found a new mechanism by which a class of molecules his lab discovered may protect brain and retinal cells against neurodegenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration and Alzheimer's. (2019-11-11)
Degenerative eye condition (AMD) to affect 77 million Europeans by 2050
The leading cause of irreversible blindness and severely impaired eyesight -- age-related macular degeneration, or AMD for short- - is expected to affect 77 million Europeans by 2050, reveal the latest calculations, published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. (2019-11-11)
Self-cannibalizing mitochondria may set the stage for ALS development
Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered a new phenomenon in the brain that could explain the development of early stages of neurodegeneration that is seen in diseases such as ALS, which affects voluntary muscle movement such as walking and talking.  The discovery was so novel, the scientists needed to coin a new term to describe it: mitoautophagy, a collection of self-destructive mitochondria in diseased upper motor neurons of the brain that begin to disintegrate from within at a very early age. (2019-11-07)
Zooming into cilia sheds light into blinding diseases
A new study reveals an unprecedented close-up view of cilia linked to blindness. (2019-11-05)
To avoid cassava disease, Tanzanian farmers can plant certain varieties in certain seasons
A nutty-flavored, starchy root vegetable, cassava (also known as yuca) is one of the most drought-resistant crops and is a major source of calories and carbs for people in developing countries, serving as the primary food for more than 800 million people. (2019-10-30)
Yale researchers find cells linked to leading cause of blindness in elderly
Researchers from Yale University, the Broad Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard University report in the Oct. (2019-10-25)
NIH scientists develop test for uncommon brain diseases
National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have developed an ultrasensitive new test to detect abnormal forms of the protein tau associated with uncommon types of neurodegenerative diseases called tauopathies. (2019-10-16)
Frontotemporal dementia is associated with alterations in immune system function
Recent research from the University of Eastern Finland revealed increased inflammatory activity in a subgroup of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). (2019-10-15)
Researchers explore spinal discs' early response to injury and ways to improve it
Researchers showed in animal models that the default injury response of spinal discs can be temporarily stopped to allow for better treatment. (2019-10-14)
Sleep apnea linked to blinding eye disease in people with diabetes
New research from Taiwan shows that severe sleep apnea is a risk factor for developing diabetic macular edema, a complication of diabetes that can cause vision loss or blindness. (2019-10-14)
How to enable light to switch on and off therapeutic antibodies
IBS researchers have developed a new biological tool that activates antibody fragments via a blue light. (2019-10-14)
More evidence linking common bladder medication to a vision-threatening eye condition
A drug widely prescribed for a bladder condition for decades, now appears to be toxic to the retina, the light sensing tissue at the back of the eye that allows us to see. (2019-10-12)
Deciphering the early stages of Parkinson's disease is a matter of time
Researchers at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the University of Virginia School of Medicine, USA, identified for the first time the initial steps of alpha-synuclein protein aggregates related to early onsets of hereditary Parkinson cases. (2019-10-11)
In-office gene therapy for wet age-related macular degeneration is coming
Gene therapy is showing promise for one of the most common causes of blindness. (2019-10-11)
Parkinson's disease is also present in the blood
The behaviour of immune cells in the blood is so different in patients with Parkinson's disease that it advocate for a new type of supplementary medicine, which can regulate the immune system and thus inhibit the deterioration of the brain. (2019-10-03)
Johns Hopkins researchers advance search for safer, easier way to deliver vision-saving gene therapy
In experiments with rats, pigs and monkeys, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have developed a way to deliver sight-saving gene therapy to the retina. (2019-09-30)
Study finds age hinders cancer development
A new study, published in Aging Cell, has found that human ageing processes may hinder cancer development. (2019-09-27)
Cellular senescence is associated with age-related blood clots
Cells that become senescent irrevocably stop dividing under stress, spewing out a mix of inflammatory proteins that lead to chronic inflammation as more and more of the cells accumulate over time. (2019-09-24)
QUT researchers use AI to bring sharper focus to eye testing
Researchers at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Australia have applied artificial intelligence (AI) deep learning techniques to develop a more accurate and detailed method for analysing images of the back of the eye to help clinicians better detect and track eye diseases, such as glaucoma and aged-related macular degeneration. (2019-09-23)
Task force provides insights and direction on cell-based therapies
A new report published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research and concurrently in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research highlights the latest advances in cell-based therapies for the treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system, such as arthritis and osteoporosis, and it identifies key unanswered questions that should be addressed through ongoing research. (2019-09-23)
Researchers have identified areas of the retina that change in mild Alzheimer's disease
Finding biomarkers that enable early detection of Alzheimer's disease is one of medicine's biggest challenges, and the retina is one of the most promising candidates. (2019-09-13)
Genetic discovery linked to rare eye disease, MacTel
Paul S. Bernstein, M.D., Ph.D., spent more than a decade working with families at the John A. (2019-09-11)
Success of gene therapy for a form of inherited blindness depends on timing
An FDA-approved gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis, an inherited vision disorder with a childhood onset and progressive nature, has improved patients' sight. (2019-09-09)
New insight into motor neuron death mechanisms could be a step toward ALS treatment
Researchers have made an important advance toward understanding why certain cells in the nervous system are prone to breaking down and dying, which is what happens in patients with ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. (2019-09-04)
Vehicle exhaust pollutants linked to near doubling in risk of common eye condition
Long term exposure to pollutants from vehicle exhaust is linked to a heightened risk of the common eye condition age-related macular degeneration, or AMD for short, suggests research published online in the Journal of Investigative Medicine. (2019-08-20)
Simple computational models can help predict post-traumatic osteoarthritis
Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, in collaboration with the University of California in San Francisco, Cleveland Clinic, the University of Queensland, the University of Oulu and Kuopio University Hospital, have developed a method to predict post-traumatic osteoarthritis in patients with ligament ruptures using a simplified computational model. (2019-08-20)
Finnish discovery brings new insight on the functioning of the eye and retinal diseases
Finnish researchers have found cellular components in the epithelial tissue of the eye, which have previously been thought to only be present in electrically active tissues, such as those in nerves and the heart. (2019-08-15)
Uric acid pathologies shorten fly lifespan, highlighting need for screening in humans
Few people get their level of uric acid, a breakdown product of metabolism, measured in their blood. (2019-08-15)
An alternate theory for what causes Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by plaques and tangles in the brain, with most efforts at finding a cure focused on these abnormal structures. (2019-08-12)
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