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Current Macular degeneration News and Events

Current Macular degeneration News and Events, Macular degeneration News Articles.
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NIH scientists develop test for uncommon brain diseases
National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have developed an ultrasensitive new test to detect abnormal forms of the protein tau associated with uncommon types of neurodegenerative diseases called tauopathies. (2019-10-16)
Frontotemporal dementia is associated with alterations in immune system function
Recent research from the University of Eastern Finland revealed increased inflammatory activity in a subgroup of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). (2019-10-15)
Researchers explore spinal discs' early response to injury and ways to improve it
Researchers showed in animal models that the default injury response of spinal discs can be temporarily stopped to allow for better treatment. (2019-10-14)
Sleep apnea linked to blinding eye disease in people with diabetes
New research from Taiwan shows that severe sleep apnea is a risk factor for developing diabetic macular edema, a complication of diabetes that can cause vision loss or blindness. (2019-10-14)
How to enable light to switch on and off therapeutic antibodies
IBS researchers have developed a new biological tool that activates antibody fragments via a blue light. (2019-10-14)
More evidence linking common bladder medication to a vision-threatening eye condition
A drug widely prescribed for a bladder condition for decades, now appears to be toxic to the retina, the light sensing tissue at the back of the eye that allows us to see. (2019-10-12)
Deciphering the early stages of Parkinson's disease is a matter of time
Researchers at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the University of Virginia School of Medicine, USA, identified for the first time the initial steps of alpha-synuclein protein aggregates related to early onsets of hereditary Parkinson cases. (2019-10-11)
In-office gene therapy for wet age-related macular degeneration is coming
Gene therapy is showing promise for one of the most common causes of blindness. (2019-10-11)
Parkinson's disease is also present in the blood
The behaviour of immune cells in the blood is so different in patients with Parkinson's disease that it advocate for a new type of supplementary medicine, which can regulate the immune system and thus inhibit the deterioration of the brain. (2019-10-03)
Johns Hopkins researchers advance search for safer, easier way to deliver vision-saving gene therapy
In experiments with rats, pigs and monkeys, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have developed a way to deliver sight-saving gene therapy to the retina. (2019-09-30)
Study finds age hinders cancer development
A new study, published in Aging Cell, has found that human ageing processes may hinder cancer development. (2019-09-27)
Cellular senescence is associated with age-related blood clots
Cells that become senescent irrevocably stop dividing under stress, spewing out a mix of inflammatory proteins that lead to chronic inflammation as more and more of the cells accumulate over time. (2019-09-24)
QUT researchers use AI to bring sharper focus to eye testing
Researchers at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Australia have applied artificial intelligence (AI) deep learning techniques to develop a more accurate and detailed method for analysing images of the back of the eye to help clinicians better detect and track eye diseases, such as glaucoma and aged-related macular degeneration. (2019-09-23)
Task force provides insights and direction on cell-based therapies
A new report published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research and concurrently in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research highlights the latest advances in cell-based therapies for the treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system, such as arthritis and osteoporosis, and it identifies key unanswered questions that should be addressed through ongoing research. (2019-09-23)
Researchers have identified areas of the retina that change in mild Alzheimer's disease
Finding biomarkers that enable early detection of Alzheimer's disease is one of medicine's biggest challenges, and the retina is one of the most promising candidates. (2019-09-13)
Genetic discovery linked to rare eye disease, MacTel
Paul S. Bernstein, M.D., Ph.D., spent more than a decade working with families at the John A. (2019-09-11)
Success of gene therapy for a form of inherited blindness depends on timing
An FDA-approved gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis, an inherited vision disorder with a childhood onset and progressive nature, has improved patients' sight. (2019-09-09)
New insight into motor neuron death mechanisms could be a step toward ALS treatment
Researchers have made an important advance toward understanding why certain cells in the nervous system are prone to breaking down and dying, which is what happens in patients with ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. (2019-09-04)
Vehicle exhaust pollutants linked to near doubling in risk of common eye condition
Long term exposure to pollutants from vehicle exhaust is linked to a heightened risk of the common eye condition age-related macular degeneration, or AMD for short, suggests research published online in the Journal of Investigative Medicine. (2019-08-20)
Simple computational models can help predict post-traumatic osteoarthritis
Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, in collaboration with the University of California in San Francisco, Cleveland Clinic, the University of Queensland, the University of Oulu and Kuopio University Hospital, have developed a method to predict post-traumatic osteoarthritis in patients with ligament ruptures using a simplified computational model. (2019-08-20)
Finnish discovery brings new insight on the functioning of the eye and retinal diseases
Finnish researchers have found cellular components in the epithelial tissue of the eye, which have previously been thought to only be present in electrically active tissues, such as those in nerves and the heart. (2019-08-15)
Uric acid pathologies shorten fly lifespan, highlighting need for screening in humans
Few people get their level of uric acid, a breakdown product of metabolism, measured in their blood. (2019-08-15)
An alternate theory for what causes Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by plaques and tangles in the brain, with most efforts at finding a cure focused on these abnormal structures. (2019-08-12)
Scientists make major breakthrough in understanding common eye disease
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin today announced a major breakthrough with important implications for sufferers of a common eye disease -- dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) -- which can cause total blindness in sufferers, and for which there are currently no approved therapies. (2019-08-08)
Expert panel in macular degeneration recommends paradigm shift for future directions
A panel of investigators assembled by the National Advisory Eye Council (NAEC) calls for large-scale collaborative research to address dry macular degeneration -- the leading cause of blindness among the elderly -- for which there is currently no effective treatment. (2019-07-26)
Identification of autophagy gene regulation mechanism related to dementia and Lou Gehrig's disease
An international Research Team led by Dr. Jeong Yoon-ha at Korea Brain Research Institute has published the results of its research in 'Autophagy'. (2019-07-18)
Regenerating human retinal ganglion cells in the dish to inform glaucoma treatment
People have a limited ability to regenerate nerves after injury or illness. (2019-07-02)
Low-cost retinal scanner could help prevent blindness worldwide
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a low-cost, portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanner that promises to bring the vision-saving technology to underserved regions throughout the United States and abroad. (2019-06-28)
Reducing the psychological distress of patients diagnosed with a common, retinal disease
A new study from City, University of London suggests that effective communication from eye health professionals may help reduce patient fears after they are diagnosed with the 'dry' form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). (2019-06-28)
Immune system can slow degenerative eye disease, NIH-led mouse study shows
A new study shows that the complement system, part of the innate immune system, plays a protective role to slow retinal degeneration in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited eye disease. (2019-06-17)
Implanted drug 'reservoir' safely reduces injections for people with macular degeneration
In a clinical trial of 220 people with 'wet' age-related macular degeneration, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, collaborators from many sites across the country, and Genentech in South San Francisco have added to evidence that using a new implant technology that continuously delivers medication into the eyes is safe and effective in helping maintain vision and reduces the need for injections in the eyes. (2019-06-13)
New web-based tool accelerates research on conditions such as dementia, sports concussion
A new new cloud-computing web platform created by scientists in the United States, Europe and South America will allow researchers to track data and analyses on the brain, potentially reducing delays in discovery. (2019-06-12)
Brighter possibilities for treating blindness
Advances in preclinical research are now being translated into innovative clinical solutions for blindness, a review published in the 10th anniversary series of science Translational Medicine depicts. (2019-06-05)
Searching for the origins of the depressive symptoms in Huntington's disease
About 40% of the affected patients with Huntington's disease -- a neurodegenerative pathology -- show depression symptoms, even in early stages before the apparition of the typical motor symptoms of the disease. (2019-05-31)
A road map to stem cell development
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have created a method of mapping how the central nervous system develops by tracking the genes expressed in cells. (2019-05-22)
Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever life-long study in mice
Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), xenon prevented early death, improved long-term cognition, and protected brain tissue in mice in a new study. (2019-05-21)
Inhibition of protein phosphorylation promotes optic nerve regeneration after injury
Research results from a recent study led by a Waseda University-led team suggest that the inhibition of phosphorylation of microtubule-binding protein CRMP2 could be a novel approach to the development of treatments for optic neuropathies, such as glaucoma and traumatic injury. (2019-05-21)
Personalized 'Eye-in-a-Dish' models reveal genetic underpinnings of macular degeneration
Using stem cells derived from six people, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers recapitulated retinal cells in the lab. (2019-05-09)
Why visual stimulation may work against Alzheimer's
MIT neuroscientists have found that using flickering light to stimulate gamma oscillations in the brain has widespread effects on neurons and immune cells called microglia. (2019-05-07)
Researchers uncover mechanism blocking retina regeneration
A discovery opens the possibility of one day restoring loss of vision by activating the retina's ability to regenerate. (2019-05-07)
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