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Current Maize News and Events

Current Maize News and Events, Maize News Articles.
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Identifying local solutions in the barotse floodplain for sustainable agriculture development
To develop locally relevant strategies that improve food security, nutrition, and conservation, researchers employed a gendered ecosystem services approach in Zambia. (2020-08-06)
European maize highlights the hidden differences within a species
Maize is one of our major staple foods and is cultivated around the world, showcasing a broad range of genetic adaptations to different environmental conditions. (2020-07-27)
European and American maize: Same same, but different
German researchers decoded the European maize genome. In comparison to North American maize lines, they discovered variations that underlie phenotypic differences and may also contribute to the heterosis effect. (2020-07-27)
Small-farm tech reduces deforestation, climate change
Small farms in Zambia that use the latest hybrid seed for maize, help reduce deforestation and tackle climate change in a new Cornell University study. (2020-07-23)
Site-directed mutagenesis in wheat via haploid induction by maize
Site-directed mutagenesis facilitates the experimental validation of gene function and can speed up plant breeding by producing new biodiversity or by reproducing previously known gene variants in other than their original genetic backgrounds. (2020-07-21)
Research underscores importance of global surveillance of plant pathogens
First spotted in the United States in 2014, bacterial leaf streak of corn is an emerging disease of corn that has now spread to ten states, including the top three corn-producing states of Illinois, Iowa, and Nebraska. (2020-07-17)
CRISPR enables one-step hybrid seed production in crops
Crop hybrid technologies have contributed to the significant yield improvement worldwide in the past decades. (2020-07-08)
Soy and wheat proteins helpful for building aging muscles, but not as potent as animal protein
On a gram for gram basis, animal proteins are more effective than plant proteins in supporting the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass with advancing age, shows research presented this week at The Physiological Society's virtual early career conference Future Physiology 2020. (2020-07-07)
Research reveals regulatory features of maize genome during early reproductive development
A team of researchers led by Andrea Eveland, Ph.D., assistant member, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, has mapped out the non-coding, 'functional' genome in maize during an early developmental window critical to formation of pollen-bearing tassels and grain-bearing ears. (2020-07-07)
Undergrad-led study suggests light environment modifications could maximize productivity
Crops form canopies with overlapping leaves. Typically, the sun leaves at the top of the canopy photosynthesize at maximum efficiency at high light, while shade leaves at the bottom photosynthesize at maximum efficiency at low light. (2020-06-24)
Study calls for reallocation of subsidies for biocontrols to fight fall armyworm
A new CABI-led study is calling for governments to reallocate subsidies to encourage the use of lower risk control options - such as biopesticides - in the fight against the devastating maize pest fall armyworm. (2020-06-17)
Improved heat-resistant wheat varieties are identified
An international study, including researchers at the University of Cordoba, analyzed 54 genetically improved wheat genotypes from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in order to determine which respond best to high temperatures (2020-06-16)
The best parents: Genetically as divergent as possible with similar preferences
The more diverse in genetics, than better. But only in cases of similar preferences. (2020-06-12)
Research reveals function of genetic pathway for reproductive fitness in flowering plants
A research collaboration has demonstrated the function of a genetic pathway for anther development, with this pathway proven in 2019 work to be present widely in the flowering plants that evolved over 200 million years ago. (2020-06-11)
How bacteria fertilize soya
Soya and clover have their very own fertiliser factories in their roots, where bacteria manufacture ammonium, which is crucial for plant growth. (2020-06-03)
UNM researchers document the first use of maize in Mesoamerica
international team of researchers investigates the earliest humans in Central America and how they adapted over time to new and changing environments, and how those changes have affected human life histories and societies. (2020-06-03)
'Unparalleled' discovery of ancient skeletons sheds light on mystery of when people started eating maize
The 'unparalleled' discovery of remarkably well-preserved ancient skeletons in Central American rock shelters has shed new light on when maize became a key part of people's diet on the continent. (2020-06-03)
The roots of a staple crop
About 9,000 years ago in the Balsas River Valley of southwestern Mexico, hunter-gatherers began domesticating teosinte, a wild grass. (2020-06-03)
A new look into the sources and impacts of greenhouse gases in China
Special issue of Advances in Atmospheric Sciences reveals new findings on China's GHG emissions and documents changes in local and regional environments. (2020-05-18)
Cahokia's rise parallels onset of corn agriculture
Corn cultivation spread from Mesoamerica to what is now the American Southwest by about 4000 B.C., but how and when the crop made it to other parts of North America is still debated. (2020-05-14)
Virus protein discovery reveals new plant-animal class of cell division disruptors
Recently, researchers from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a plant viral protein named 17K that disrupts host cell division to promote its own propagation in infected tissues. (2020-05-13)
New software supports decision-making for breeding
Researchers at the University of Göttingen have developed an innovative software program for the simulation of breeding programmes. (2020-05-12)
Climate-smart agricultural practices increase maize yield in Malawi
Climate change creates extreme weather patterns that are especially challenging for people in developing countries and can severely impact agricultural yield and food security. (2020-04-30)
Identifying land cover from outer space
Having detailed land cover information is important for a better understanding of our environment. (2020-04-20)
Amazonian crops domesticated 10,000 years ago
As agriculture emerged in early civilizations, crops were domesticated in four locations around the world -- rice in China; grains and pulses in the Middle East; maize, beans and squash in Mesoamerica; and potatoes and quinoa in the Andes. (2020-04-08)
Maize, not metal, key to native settlements' history in NY
New Cornell University research is producing a more accurate historical timeline for the occupation of Native American sites in upstate New York, based on radiocarbon dating of organic materials and statistical modeling. (2020-03-19)
A nuclear conflict anywhere on Earth would cause global crop crisis, study finds
Inflamed tensions between India and Pakistan over the Kashmir region have raised concerns about the potential for a limited nuclear war between the two countries. (2020-03-16)
Even a limited India-Pakistan nuclear war would bring global famine, says study
A new multinational study incorporating the latest models of global climate, crop production and trade examines the possible effects of a nuclear exchange between two longtime enemies: India and Pakistan. (2020-03-16)
New aflatoxin biocontrol product lowers contamination of groundnut and maize in Senegal
Recently a team of plant pathologists have developed an aflatoxin biocontrol product, Aflasafe SN01, for use in Senegal, which includes four atoxigenic isolates native to Senegal and distinct from active ingredients used in other biocontrol products in Africa and elsewhere. (2020-03-12)
A genetic map for maize
Researchers have decoded the genetic map for how maize from tropical environments can be adapted to the temperate US summer growing season. (2020-02-21)
'Net' is closing in on more viable biological control options for fall armyworm menace
The 'net' is closing in on more viable biological control agents to fight the scourge of the fall armyworm which is already wreaking havoc in most African countries as well as more than a dozen Asian countries. (2020-01-27)
Researchers use remote sensing to estimate nitrogen deposition in North China
A new study estimated the nitrogen deposition in northern China through a combination of remote sensing data and atmospheric chemical transport model simulations. (2020-01-06)
'Lost crops' could have fed as many as maize
Grown together, newly examined 'lost crops' could have produced enough seed to feed as many indigenous people as traditionally grown maize, according to new research from Washington University in St. (2019-12-23)
Researchers analyze artifacts to better understand ancient dietary practices
New research from anthropologists at McMaster University and California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB), is shedding light on ancient dietary practices, the evolution of agricultural societies and ultimately, how plants have become an important element of the modern diet. (2019-12-11)
Megadroughts fueled Peruvian cloud forest activity
New research from Florida Tech found that strong and long-lasting droughts parched the usually moist Peruvian cloud forests, spurring farmers to colonize new cropland. (2019-12-09)
Recycling nutrient-rich industrial waste products enhances soil, reduces carbon
Recycling biotechnology byproducts can enhance soil health while reducing carbon emissions and maintaining crop yields. (2019-12-05)
Researchers clear the path for 'designer' plants
A team of researchers at the University of Georgia has found a way to identify gene regulatory elements that could help produce 'designer' plants and lead to improvements in food crops at a critical time. (2019-11-18)
How nematodes outsmart the defenses of pests
The western corn rootworm, one of the world's most damaging maize pests, can use plant defense compounds to defend itself against its own natural enemies, so-called entomopathogenic nematodes. (2019-11-15)
Protective microparticles shield and deliver micronutrients to people
A team of scientists has created a new microparticle-based platform that can preserve, protect and deliver micronutrients such as iron to rodents and human volunteers. (2019-11-13)
Microparticles could help fight malnutrition
MIT researchers have now developed a new way to fortify staple foods with these micronutrients by encapsulating them in a biocompatible polymer that prevents the nutrients from being degraded during storage or cooking. (2019-11-13)
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