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Current Malaria News and Events

Current Malaria News and Events, Malaria News Articles.
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Deet gives humans an 'invisibilty cloak' to fend off mosquito bites
Since its invention during the Second World War for soldiers stationed in countries where malaria transmission rates were high, researchers have worked to pinpoint precisely how DEET actually affects mosquitos. (2019-10-17)
Aҫaí berry extracts fight malaria in mice
Despite humanity's best efforts to eradicate malaria, the disease struck more than 200 million people in 2017, according to the World Health Organization. (2019-10-16)
Resurrection of 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria jumped from gorillas to humans
For the first time, scientists have uncovered the likely series of events that led to the world's deadliest malaria parasite being able to jump from gorillas to humans. (2019-10-15)
Researchers rediscover fast-acting German insecticide lost in the aftermath of WWII
A new study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society explores the chemistry as well as the complicated and alarming history of DFDT, a fast-acting insecticide. (2019-10-11)
For the first time, UMD professor observes crystallized iron product, hemozoin, made in mammals
For the first time ever, a UMD professor has observed a crystallized iron product called hemozoin being made in mammals, with widespread implications for future research and treatment of blood disorders. (2019-10-01)
New tool in fight against malaria
Modifying a class of molecules originally developed to treat the skin disease psoriasis could lead to a new malaria drug that is effective against malaria parasites resistant to currently available drugs. (2019-09-18)
Anemia may contribute to the spread of dengue fever
Mosquitoes are more likely to acquire the dengue virus when they feed on blood with low levels of iron, researchers report in the 16 September issue of Nature Microbiology. (2019-09-16)
Malaria could be felled by an Antarctic sea sponge
The frigid waters of the Antarctic may yield a treatment for a deadly disease that affects populations in some of the hottest places on earth. (2019-09-11)
The Lancet: Malaria can and should be eradicated within a generation, declare global health experts
Authored by 41 of the world's leading malariologists, biomedical scientists, economists, and health policy experts, this seminal report synthesizes existing evidence with new epidemiological and financial analyses to demonstrate that -- with the right tools, strategies, and sufficient funding - eradication of the disease is possible within a generation. (2019-09-08)
Diversity of Plasmodium falciparum across Sub-Saharan Africa
Scientists from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research joined a network of scientists to publish a study in Science to identify a regional character to Plasmodium falciparum across Africa. (2019-09-05)
By comparing needles to mosquitoes, new model offers insights into Hepatitis C solutions
Removing used needles does not reduce the spread of Hepatitis C virus -- instead, changing the ratio of infected to uninfected needles is critical, study finds. (2019-09-04)
Genome mining reveals novel production pathway for promising malaria treatment
Researchers at the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois are exploring the relationship between microbial natural products and the gene clusters that enable their production. (2019-09-04)
Researchers identify biomarker to predict if someone infected with malaria will get sick
Increased p53, the well-known tumor-suppressor protein, can predict whether malaria-infected children will develop fever or other symptoms, suggests a study publishing Sept. (2019-09-03)
Malaria infection is associated with increased risk of heart failure
Malaria infection is linked with a 30% raised risk of heart failure, according to a small study presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. (2019-09-02)
Immortalized blood cell lines enable new studies of malaria invasion
Researchers at the University of Bristol and Imperial College London have established a new model system that uses red blood cells grown in the laboratory to study how malaria parasites invade red blood cells. (2019-08-29)
'Malaria cell atlas' reveals gene clusters, possible drug targets
After performing single-cell RNA sequencing on thousands of malaria parasites -- the genomes of which have historically encoded many uncharacterized genes -- researchers report the first high-resolution atlas of malaria parasite gene expression across the entirety of these organisms' complex lifecycles. (2019-08-22)
Malaria control success in Africa at risk from spread of multi-drug resistance
In the first continent-wide genomic study of malaria parasites in Africa, scientists have uncovered the genetic features of Plasmodium falciparum parasites that inhabit different regions of the continent, including the genetic factors that confer resistance to anti-malarial drugs. (2019-08-22)
Map of malaria behavior set to revolutionize research
The first detailed map of individual malaria parasite behavior across each stage of its complicated life cycle has been created by scientists. (2019-08-22)
Malaria expert warns of need for malaria drug to treat severe cases in US
The US each year sees more than 1,500 cases of malaria, and currently there is limited access to an intravenously administered (IV) drug needed for the more serious cases. (2019-08-19)
Monkey malaria breakthrough offers cure for relapsing malaria
A breakthrough in monkey malaria research by two University of Otago scientists could help scientists diagnose and treat a relapsing form of human malaria. (2019-08-15)
RTS,S vaccine could favor the acquisition of natural immunity against malaria
The RTS,S malaria vaccine could enhance the production of protective antibodies upon subsequent parasite infection, according to a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The results, published in BMC Medicine, identify the antigens (or protein fragments) that could be included in future, more effective multivalent vaccines. (2019-08-13)
Mosquito 'spit glands' hold key to curbing malaria, study shows
Mosquitoes can harbor thousands of malaria-causing parasites in their bodies, yet while slurping blood from a victim, they transmit just a tiny fraction of them. (2019-08-12)
Nanovectors could improve the combined administration of antimalarial drugs
According to the study, the strategy has the added advantage of targeting the transmissible phase of the parasite -- the gametocyte. (2019-08-08)
When mosquitoes are biting during rainy season, net use increases, study finds
The more rainfall a region in sub-Saharan Africa gets, the more mosquitoes proliferate there and the more likely its residents will sleep under their insecticide-treated bed nets to prevent malaria transmission, a new study from the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs suggests. (2019-07-30)
Selective antibiotics following nature's example
Chemists from Konstanz develop selective agents to combat infectious diseases -- based on the structures of natural products (2019-07-30)
Researchers show the importance of copy-number variants in the development of insecticide resistance in malaria mosquitoes
Researchers from LSTM, working alongside colleagues from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Cambridge and the Big Data Institute, University of Oxford, have used whole genome sequencing to understand copy-number variants (CNVs) in malaria mosquitoes and their role in insecticide resistance. (2019-07-26)
Antimalarial treatments less effective in severely malnourished children
Researchers have found that severe malnutrition is associated with lower exposure to the antimalarial drug lumefantrine in children treated with artemether-lumefantrine, the most common treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria. (2019-07-24)
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Rapidly spreading multidrug-resistant parasites render frontline malaria drug ineffective in southeast Asia
Multidrug-resistant forms of Plasmodium falciparum parasites, the most lethal species causing human malaria, have evolved even higher levels of resistance to antimalarial drugs and spread rapidly since 2015, becoming firmly established in multiple regions of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam, where they are causing alarmingly high treatment failure rates to a widely used frontline malaria drug combination. (2019-07-22)
Multidrug-resistant malaria spreading in Asia
Genomic surveillance has revealed that malaria resistance to two first-line antimalarial drugs has spread rapidly from Cambodia to neighboring countries in Southeast Asia. (2019-07-22)
Understanding the mode of action of the primaquine: New insights into a 70 year old puzzle
Researchers at LSTM have taken significant steps in understanding the way that the anti-malarial drug primaquine (PQ) works, which they hope will lead to the development of new, safer and more effective treatments for malaria. (2019-07-19)
Avian malaria behind drastic decline of London's iconic sparrow?
London's house sparrows (Passer domesticus) have plummeted by 71% since 1995, with new research suggesting avian malaria could be to blame. (2019-07-16)
Mosquito surveillance uncovers new information about malaria transmission in madagascar
Riley Tedrow, Ph.D., a medical entomologist at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, has uncovered new findings about malaria transmission in Madagascar. (2019-07-11)
Getting to zero malaria cases in zanzibar
New research led by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs, Ifakara Health Institute and the Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Program suggests that a better understanding of human behavior at night -- when malaria mosquitoes are biting -- could be key to preventing lingering cases. (2019-07-10)
How the mosquito immune system fights off the malaria parasite
A new study describes the way mosquito immune systems fight malaria parasites using various waves of resistance. (2019-07-10)
Controlling deadly malaria without chemicals
Scientists have finally found malaria's Achilles' heel, a neurotoxin that isn't harmful to any living thing except Anopheles mosquitoes that spread malaria. (2019-06-28)
Botox cousin can reduce malaria in an environmentally friendly way
Researchers at the universities in Stockholm and Lund, in collaboration with researchers from the University of California, have found a new toxin that selectively targets mosquitos. (2019-06-28)
Malaria hijacks your genes to invade your liver
Duke University researchers have identified more than 100 'hijacked' human genes that malaria parasites commandeer to take up residence inside their victim's liver during the silent early stages of infection, before symptoms appear. (2019-06-27)
Climate warming could increase malaria risk in cooler regions
Malaria parasites develop faster in mosquitoes at lower temperatures than previously thought, according to researchers at Penn State and the University of Exeter. (2019-06-26)
Pathogen engineered to self-destruct underlies cancer vaccine platform
A team of investigators has developed a cancer vaccine technology using live, attenuated pathogens as vectors. (2019-06-24)
New assay detects patients' resistance to antimalarial drugs from a drop of blood
Antimalarial drugs appear to follow a typical pattern, with early effectiveness eventually limited by the emergence of drug resistance. (2019-06-13)
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