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Current Malaria News and Events

Current Malaria News and Events, Malaria News Articles.
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Malaria vaccines based on engineered parasites show safety, signs of efficacy
Two vaccines for malaria based on genetically engineered malaria parasites have been found to be safe in humans and show preliminary signs of protection, according to a pair of new phase 1/2a clinical trials. (2020-05-20)
First clinical trial with genetically modified malaria vaccine completed
In an innovative study, Radboudumc and LUMC jointly tested a candidate vaccine based on a genetically weakened malaria parasite. (2020-05-20)
The malaria parasite P. vivax can remain in the spleen upon expression of certain proteins
The malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax can adhere to human spleen cells through the expression of so-called variant proteins. (2020-05-18)
Malaria parasite ticks to its own internal clock
Researchers have long known that all of the millions of malaria parasites within an infected person's body move through their cell cycle at the same time. (2020-05-14)
Discovery of malaria parasite's clock could pave way to new treatments
The parasite that causes malaria has its own internal clock, explaining the disease's rhythmic fevers and opening new pathways for therapeutics. (2020-05-14)
Malaria runs like clockwork; so does the parasite that causes the disease
A new study uncovers evidence that an intrinsic oscillator drives the blood stage cycle of the malaria parasite, P. falciparum, suggesting parasites have evolved mechanisms to precisely maintain periodicity. (2020-05-14)
New evidence suggests malaria cycles are innate to the organism
Scientists from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research joined partners to publish a study providing clear evidence that malaria's characteristic cycle of fever and chills is a result of the parasite's own influence -- not factors from the host. (2020-05-14)
Ticking time bomb: Malaria parasite has its own inherent clock
The activity of the parasite that causes malaria is driven by the parasite's own inherent clock, new research led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. (2020-05-14)
Scientists generate millions of mature human cells in a mouse embryo
A team led by University at Buffalo scientists has developed a method that dramatically ramps up production of mature human cells in mouse embryos. (2020-05-13)
Molecular signatures can predict the efficacy of malaria vaccines
Molecular signatures before and after immunization can predict vaccine-induced protection, according to a study by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The study analysed the gene expression in peripheral blood cells from individuals immunized with the first malaria vaccine (Mosquirix or RTS,S) and another experimental malaria vaccine. (2020-05-13)
Lidar technology demonstrates how light levels determine mosquito 'rush hour'
The first study to remotely track wild mosquito populations using laser radar (lidar) technology found that mosquitoes in a southeastern Tanzanian village are most active during morning and evening 'rush hour' periods, suggesting these may be the most effective times to target the insects with sprays designed to prevent the spread of malaria. (2020-05-13)
Malaria vaccine trial samples reveal immune benchmarks for achieving protection
By studying samples from two independent clinical trials of malaria vaccines, Gemma Moncunill and colleagues have linked signatures in the immune system to better vaccine protection from the disease in children and adults. (2020-05-13)
Malaria mosquitoes eliminated in lab by creating all-male populations
A modification that creates more male offspring was able to eliminate populations of malaria mosquitoes in lab experiments. (2020-05-12)
Malaria vaccine: Could this 'ingredient' be the secret to success?
Melbourne researchers have identified a microscopic 'ingredient' that can be added to a malaria vaccine for efficient protection against the deadly pathogen. (2020-05-12)
Blood test a potential new tool for controlling infections
A new technique could provide vital information about a community's immunity to infectious diseases including malaria and COVID-19. (2020-05-11)
New computational method unravels single-cell data from multiple people
A new computational method for assigning the donor in single cell RNA sequencing experiments provides an accurate way to unravel data from a mixture of people. (2020-05-06)
Malaria risk is highest in early evening, study finds
Wide-scale use of insecticide-treated bed nets has led to substantial declines in global incidences of malaria in recent years. (2020-05-04)
UBC discovery opens new avenues for designing drugs to combat drug-resistant malaria
For the first time, UBC researchers have shown a key difference in the three-dimensional structures of a key metabolic enzyme in the parasite that causes malaria compared to its human counterpart. (2020-04-30)
A step closer to eradicating malaria
Strategies that treat households in the broad vicinity of a recent malaria case with anti-malarial drugs, insecticides, or both could significantly reduce malaria in low-transmission settings. (2020-04-29)
New evidence for optimizing malaria treatment in pregnant women
The research, published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases is the fruit of joint project between investigators from around the world to conduct the largest individual patient data meta-analysis to date under the WWARN umbrella. (2020-04-29)
New evidence for optimising malaria treatment in pregnant women
The research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases is the fruit of joint project between investigators from around the world to conduct the largest individual patient data meta-analysis to date under The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network?WWARN?umbrella. (2020-04-29)
How blood cells deform, recover when traveling through tiny channels
In this week's Biomicrofluidics, a method to characterize the shape recovery of healthy human RBCs flowing through a microfluidic constricted channel is reported. (2020-04-28)
Unique Namibian trial finds smart interventions reduce malaria transmission by 75%
A trial by scientists at the Wits Research Institute for Malaria (WRIM), in collaboration with Namibian, UK, and US researchers demonstrates how mass drug administration and vector control can help eliminate malaria. (2020-04-27)
Research reveals a new malaria vaccine candidate
In a study that could lead to a new vaccine against malaria, researchers have found antibodies that trigger a 'kill switch' in malarial cells, causing them to self-destruct. (2020-04-22)
Genetic variation not an obstacle to gene drive strategy to control mosquitoes
New research from entomologists at UC Davis clears a potential obstacle to using CRISPR-Cas9 'gene drive' technology to control mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever and Zika. (2020-04-16)
Deadliest malaria strain protects itself from the immune system
The parasite causing the most severe form of human malaria uses proteins to make red blood cells sticky, making it harder for the immune system to destroy it and leading to potentially fatal blood clots. (2020-04-13)
St. Jude experimental anti-malarial drug shows promise in first clinical trial
Malaria is a leading killer of children worldwide, and new drugs are needed. (2020-04-08)
Drugs considered for COVID-19 can raise risk for dangerous abnormal heart rhythms
As some consider treating coronavirus patients with a combination of the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine and the antibiotic azithromycin, cardiologists are advising caution because both medications can increase the risk for dangerous abnormal heart rhythms, which can in turn lead to cardiac arrest. (2020-04-02)
The Lancet: Triple therapies to treat malaria are effective and safe
The first clinical trial of two triple artemisinin-based combination therapies for malaria finds that the combinations are highly efficacious with no safety concerns. (2020-03-11)
Is your coffee contributing to malaria risk?
Researchers at the University of Sydney and University of São Paulo, Brazil, estimate 20% of the malaria risk in deforestation hot spots is driven by the international trade of exports including: coffee, timber, soybean, cocoa, wood products, palm oil, tobacco, beef and cotton. (2020-03-09)
Air pollution is one of the world's most dangerous health risks
Researchers calculate that the effects of air pollution shorten the lives of people around the world by an average of almost three years. (2020-03-05)
Novel compound sparks new malaria treatment hope
A novel class of antimalarial compounds that can effectively kill malaria parasites has been developed by Australian and US researchers. (2020-03-04)
The world faces an air pollution 'pandemic'
Air pollution is responsible for shortening people's lives worldwide on a scale far greater than wars and other forms of violence, parasitic and insect-born diseases such as malaria, HIV/AIDS and smoking, according to a study published in Cardiovascular Research. (2020-03-02)
How malaria detects and shields itself from approaching immune cells
Malaria parasites can sense a molecule produced by approaching immune cells and then use it to protect themselves from destruction, according to new findings published today in eLife. (2020-02-18)
NIH study supports new approach for treating cerebral malaria
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health found evidence that specific immune cells may play a key role in the devastating effects of cerebral malaria, a severe form of malaria that mainly affects young children. (2020-02-18)
Double success for University drug resistance research
Swansea University research into the threat posed by antifungal drug resistance has been highlighted in two prestigious international journals. (2020-02-14)
New research shows how the malaria parasite grows and multiplies
Scientists have made a major breakthrough in understanding how the parasite that causes malaria is able to multiply at such an alarming rate, which could be a vital clue in discovering how it has evolved, and how it can be stopped. (2020-02-11)
Discovery paves path forward in the fight against the deadliest form of malaria
Scientists have identified a key molecule involved in the development of cerebral malaria, a deadly form of the tropical disease. (2020-02-07)
Geography, age and anemia shape childhood vaccine responses in Sub-Saharan Africa
Vaccine responses in the developing immune systems of children may depend on factors such as age, location and anemia status, according to a study comparing samples from 1,119 Dutch children to 171 children in sub-Saharan Africa who took part in a malaria vaccine trial. (2020-02-06)
Portable lab you plug into your phone can diagnose illnesses like coronavirus
Engineers with the University of Cincinnati have created a tiny portable lab that plugs into your phone, connecting it automatically to your doctor through a custom app UC developed. (2020-02-06)
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