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Current Marine species News and Events

Current Marine species News and Events, Marine species News Articles.
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Pitt study: Sexual selection alone could spark formation of new species
Because of imprinted preferences, strawberry poison frog females mate more with similar colored males, and less with differently colored males. (2019-10-17)
Phylogenetic analysis forces rethink of termite evolution
Despite their important ecological role as decomposers, termites are often overlooked in research. (2019-10-17)
First scientific description of elusive bird illuminates plight of Borneo's forests
Scientists with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and collaborators surveying the birdlife of Borneo have discovered a startling surprise: an undescribed species of bird, which has been named the spectacled flowerpecker. (2019-10-17)
Scientists discover new species of wasp-mimicking praying mantis
Cleveland Museum of Natural History Director of Research and Collections Dr. (2019-10-17)
Industrial melanism linked to same gene in 3 moth species
The rise of dark forms of many species of moth in heavily polluted areas of 19th and 20th century Britain, known as industrial melanism, was a highly visible response to environmental change. (2019-10-17)
The composition of species is changing in ecosystems across the globe
While the identities of species in local assemblages are undergoing significant changes, their average number is relatively constant. (2019-10-17)
Global biodiversity crisis is a large-scale reorganization, with greatest loss in tropical oceans
Local biodiversity of species -- the scale on which humans feel contributions from biodiversity -- is being rapidly reorganized, according to a new global analysis of biodiversity data from more than 200 studies, together representing all major biomes. (2019-10-17)
Mapping global biodiversity change
A new study, published in Science, which focuses on mapping biodiversity change in marine and land ecosystems shows that loss of biodiversity is most prevalent in the tropic, with changes in marine ecosystems outpacing those on land. (2019-10-17)
New study uncovers 'magnetic' memory of European glass eels
A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and at the Institute of Marine Research in Norway found that European glass eels use their magnetic sense to 'imprint' a memory of the direction of water currents in the estuary where they become juveniles. (2019-10-17)
Tailings dumped into Portmán Bay continue to release metals into the sea 25 years later
The waters of the Mediterranean Sea continue to receive dissolved metals from the mining waste deposited in Portmán Bay (Murcia) 25 years after the cessation of mining activity. (2019-10-16)
Galapagos study highlights importance of biodiversity in the face of climate change
Study of wave turbulence suggests that highly mobile species and more diverse ecological communities may be more resilient to the effects of changing environmental conditions. (2019-10-16)
3-D printed coral could help endangered reefs
Threats to coral reefs are everywhere--rising water temperatures, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, fishing and other human activities. (2019-10-16)
Clingfish biology inspires better suction cup
A team of engineers and marine biologists built a better suction cup inspired by the mechanism that allows the clingfish to adhere to both smooth and rough surfaces. (2019-10-16)
Study helps pinpoint what makes species vulnerable to environmental change
Researchers from Princeton University affiliated with PEI reported that a bird species' ability to adapt to seasonal temperature changes may be one factor in whether it can better withstand environmental disruption. (2019-10-16)
Rare 'itinerant breeding' behavior revealed in California bird
Only two bird species have ever been shown to undertake what scientists call 'itinerant breeding': nesting in one area, migrating to another region, and nesting again there within the same year, to take advantage of shifting food resources. (2019-10-15)
Making conservation 'contagious'
New research reveals conservation initiatives often spread like disease, a fact which can help scientists and policymakers design programs more likely to be taken up. (2019-10-15)
Researchers describe a survival strategy in living corals which was only seen in fossil records
Some corals can recover after massive mortality episodes caused by the water temperature rise. (2019-10-15)
Geologists reveal anoxia caused loss in biodiversity in ancient seas
Since 2016 the researchers of the Department of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology have been engaged in a research project analysing the causes of Silurian biodiversity crisis. (2019-10-15)
Resurrection of 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria jumped from gorillas to humans
For the first time, scientists have uncovered the likely series of events that led to the world's deadliest malaria parasite being able to jump from gorillas to humans. (2019-10-15)
Two new porcelain crab species discovered
Two new symbiotic porcelain crab species have been described. One of them, from the South China Sea of Vietnam, inhabits the compact tube-like shelters built by the polychaete worm with other organisms. (2019-10-15)
NASA's Terra satellite catches a glimpse of a fleeting Ema
Tropical Storm Ema had a very short life, but NASA's Terra satellite caught a glimpse of the storm before it dissipated in the Central Pacific Ocean. (2019-10-15)
The makeup of mariculture: FSU researchers examine global trends in seafood farming
The process of farming seafood in the ocean, known as mariculture, is a growing trend yet little is known about the trajectories of its development. (2019-10-14)
Groundbreaking video captures whale bubble-net feeding in University of Hawaii research
University of Hawai'i at Mānoa's Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP) researchers and key collaborators captured amazing whale's-point-of-view and aerial drone video of humpback whale bubble-net feeding. (2019-10-13)
The impact of human-caused noise pollution on birds
Anthropogenic noise pollution (ANP) is a globally invasive phenomenon impacting natural systems, but most research has occurred at local scales with few species. (2019-10-11)
New tool enables Nova Scotia lobster fishery to address impacts of climate change
Researchers use long-term survey data sets and climate models to help fishing communities plan for a warmer ocean. (2019-10-11)
Study offers solution to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle
New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades. (2019-10-10)
Right whale mothers 'whisper' to their calves to avoid attracting predators
As new moms, North Atlantic right whales tone down their underwater vocalizations and 'whisper' to their young calves to avoid attracting predators, a new study by scientists at Syracuse University, Duke University and NOAA Fisheries' Northeast Fisheries Center finds. (2019-10-10)
Mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest revealed
A research group led by Prof. MA Keping from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Institute of Microbiology, have now revealed the underlying mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest. (2019-10-09)
Reef fish caring for their young are taken advantage of by other fish
Among birds, the practice of laying eggs in other birds' nests is surprisingly common. (2019-10-09)
Infectious disease in marine life linked to decades of ocean warming
New research shows that long-term changes in diseases in ocean species coincides with decades of widespread environmental change. (2019-10-09)
New large-sized insect species discovered in tropical forest
Scientists at the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland have studied the diversity of tropical parasitoid wasps for years. (2019-10-08)
The deeper these octopuses live, the wartier their skin
Deep beneath the ocean's surface, surprisingly cute pink octopuses creep along the seafloor. (2019-10-08)
Study recommends special protection of emperor penguins
In a new study published this week in the journal Biological Conservation, an international team of researchers recommends the need for additional measures to protect and conserve one of the most iconic Antarctic species -- the emperor penguin (Aptenodyptes forsteri). (2019-10-08)
Confronting colony collapse
Researchers from the Ecology and Evolution Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) sequenced the genomes of the two Varroa mite species that parasitize the honey bee. (2019-10-03)
Ant-plant partnerships may play unexpected role in ant evolution
Partnerships between ant and plant species appear to arise from -- but not drive -- rapid diversification of ants into new species. (2019-10-03)
Scientists discover interaction between good and bad fungi that drives forest biodiversity
Researchers from the University of Maryland and the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that the type of beneficial soil fungi living around tree roots determined how quickly the trees accumulated harmful, pathogenic fungi as they grew and could play a key role in determining forest biodiversity. (2019-10-03)
Global wildlife trade is higher than previous estimates show
At least one in five vertebrate species on Earth are bought and sold on the wildlife market, according to a new study, the trade estimates for which are 40-60% higher than prior recorded estimates. (2019-10-03)
Researchers use drones to weigh whales
Researchers from Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies (AIAS) in Denmark and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US devised a way to accurately estimate the weight of free-living whales using only aerial images taken by drones. (2019-10-02)
Fossil fish gives new insights into the evolution
An international research team led by Giuseppe Marramà from the Institute of Paleontology of the University of Vienna discovered a new and well-preserved fossil stingray with an exceptional anatomy, which greatly differs from living species. (2019-10-02)
Swimming toward an 'internet of health'?
In recent years, the seemingly inevitable 'internet of things' has attracted considerable attention: the idea that in the future, everything in the physical world -- machines, objects, people -- will be connected to the internet. (2019-10-02)
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