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Current Marriage News and Events

Current Marriage News and Events, Marriage News Articles.
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Education the key to equal parenting rights for same-sex couples
Same-sex marriage may have been given the green (or rainbow) light in many countries around the world, but it appears there are still some entrenched attitudes in society when it comes to same-sex parenting. (2020-03-10)
Romance, scent, and sleep: The stuff that dreams are made of
New research accepted for publication in the journal Psychological Science suggests that the scent of a romantic partner can improve your quality of sleep. (2020-02-13)
Love matters: How parents' love shapes children's lives
Parents often put their own relationship on the back burner to concentrate on their children, but a new study shows that when spouses love each other, children stay in school longer and marry later in life. (2020-02-12)
Study shows effects of Chinese divorce law on women's wellbeing
In a new study, Yale sociologist Emma Zang examined the consequences of the 2011 judicial interpretation on the well being of men and women. (2020-01-24)
How human social structures emerge
What rules shaped humanity's original social networks? The earliest social networks were tightly knit cultural groups made of multiple biologically related families. (2020-01-20)
You create your own false information, study finds
Along with partisan news outlets and political blogs, there's another surprising source of misinformation on controversial topics -- it's you. (2019-12-09)
The influence of alcohol consumption among cohabitating partners
Research has linked a partner's or spouse's drinking with changes in alcohol-related behaviors, but few studies have considered only cohabiting relationships. (2019-12-04)
Men who receive home care from spouse more likely to feel burdensome than women
A spouse requiring caregiving for chronic illness or a disability can create a stressful environment for married couples. (2019-11-11)
The medieval Catholic church's influence on psychology of Western, industrialized societies
The Western Catholic church's influence on marriage and family structures during the Middle Ages shaped the cultural evolution of the beliefs and behaviors now common among Western Europeans and their cultural descendants, researchers report. (2019-11-07)
Study examines theory on menopause age and symptom severity
A recent theory states that women enter menopause at different ages and have varying extents of symptoms due in part to residence patterns after marriage -- or whether couples disperse to live with paternal or maternal kin. (2019-11-06)
Study: Teens who have loving bond with mother less likely to enter abusive relationships
A mother's warmth and acceptance toward her teenagers may help prevent those children from being in an abusive relationship later in life, even if her own marriage is contentious, according to a new University at Buffalo study. (2019-10-30)
BU finds PTSD nearly doubles infection risk
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study is the first to examine the relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dozens of infection types in a nationwide cohort. (2019-10-15)
Research highlights importance of religious vote amid changing social landscape
Canadians who consider religion to be important in their lives were still more likely to vote for the Conservative Party in 2015, finds new research from the University of Waterloo. (2019-10-15)
One way childhood trauma leads to poorer health for women
Researchers have long known that childhood trauma is linked to poorer health for women at midlife. (2019-09-17)
Married CEOs are more committed to social issues than non-married peers
Firms led by married CEOs were associated with significantly higher scores on a respected corporate social responsibility index. (2019-09-17)
New research sheds light on how happy couples argue
In marriage, conflict is inevitable. Even the happiest couples argue. (2019-09-16)
Bias against single people affects their cancer treatment
New research reveals the dangerous bias that's been buried in the fine print of academic and medical journals for more than 30 years. (2019-09-09)
Do unmarried women face shortages of partners in the US marriage market?
One explanation for declines in marriage is a shortage of economically-attractive men for unmarried women to marry. (2019-09-05)
Beliefs about uncommitted sex may put marriages at risk
An individual's behaviors and attitudes in relation to uncommitted sexual relationships, even before the marriage, can contribute to marital satisfaction or dissolution. (2019-09-05)
Religion associated with HPV vaccination rate for college women
A survey of female college students finds 25% had not been vaccinated for HPV and religion may be a contributing factor. (2019-08-19)
In difficult times, having multiple husbands can be an advantage
Researchers infer that women can buffer themselves against economic and social crises, and more effectively keep their children alive. (2019-08-14)
Does marital status affect prognosis after breast cancer diagnosis?
In a Cancer Medicine study of 298,434 patients diagnosed with breast cancer between 2004 and 2012, married patients had a better prognosis than patients who were single, who in turn had a better prognosis than those who were divorced, separated, or widowed. (2019-07-03)
CEO political activism -- Jobseekers want bosses who take a stand
Chief executives who speak out on political issues and take a principled stance are increasingly sought out by jobseekers who believe such behaviour signals fair treatment, respect for employees, and a more responsible vision beyond nurturing the bottom line, new research shows. (2019-07-03)
Why money cannot 'buy' housework
If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his partner will have her own bank account. (2019-06-24)
Parents of depressed teens in treatment may also benefit from counseling
Parents often seek mental health treatment for a child struggling with depression, but the treatment shouldn't stop with the depressed teen, suggests a new Northwestern Medicine study. (2019-06-06)
Teen pregnancy still a major challenge in India, strongly linked to child stunting
Children born to teenage mothers are more likely to be undernourished than children of adult mothers. (2019-05-16)
The enduring effects of mother-child interactions as children become adults
Interactions between a mother and her child have been linked to cognitive outcomes in childhood, but little work has looked at farther-reaching effects. (2019-05-09)
Short period of parental sexual contact prior to pregnancy increases offspring risk of schizophrenia
Mount Sinai study may help explain some of the excess risks for inflammatory diseases in first born children. (2019-04-23)
At last, acknowledging royal women's political power
Across the globe in a variety of societies, royal women found ways to advance the issues they cared about and advocate for the people important to them as detailed in a recent paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Research. (2019-04-16)
Relationship benefits can be seen in your eyes
BYU psychology professor Wendy Birmingham's lab used an infrared camera that measured pupil width to track people's response to stressful events in real-time. (2019-04-08)
Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization, study finds
In a study of 200 years of pre-industrial Quebecois genealogical history, researchers at Brown found that fertility-related changes in natural selection during the pre-industrial era paved the way for economic and technological progress. (2019-04-04)
Harvesting water energy using slippery surfaces
Inspired by natural pitcher plant surface that exhibits a peculiar slippery property, a novel slippery lubricant-impregnated porous surface (SLIPS) based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG), referred to as SLIPS-TENG, is developed to efficiently harvest energy from the most abundant, affordable resource, water. (2019-03-27)
Prenatal testosterone linked to long-term effects in females who share womb with male twin
Women who shared their mother's womb with a male twin are less likely to graduate from high school or college, have earned less by their early 30s, and have lower fertility and marriage rates when compared with twins who are both female, according to new Northwestern University research. (2019-03-18)
The world's adolescents -- large unmet needs and growing inequalities
The first detailed global study of adolescent health reveals: growing inequality with a large disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific, obesity rates have doubled, with countries in the Pacific region having among the highest prevalence, anemia remains unchecked, India bearing heavy burden, investments in health, education, legal systems have not kept pace with needs, and gender inequity is a powerful driver of poor adolescent health. (2019-03-12)
The Lancet: Disease, violence and inequality threaten more adolescents worldwide than ever before
In the first study to track recent global changes to adolescent health, published in The Lancet, researchers estimate that, compared with 1990, an additional 250 million adolescents in 2016 were living in countries where they faced a triple burden of infectious disease, non-communicable diseases including obesity, and injuries -- including from violence. (2019-03-12)
Mobile devices don't reduce shared family time, study finds
The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less -- but not in shared activities such as watching TV and eating. (2019-03-11)
The calypso caliphate: How Trinidad and Tobago became an ISIS recruiting hotspot
Research from the University of Kent has shed new light on individuals from Trinidad and Tobago that have traveled to Iraq and Syria to join ISIS since 2013, finding that they do not conform to the stereotypical Western view of an ISIS fighter. (2019-03-07)
Happy in marriage? Genetics may play a role
People fall in love for many reasons -- similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. (2019-02-28)
Federal same-sex marriage ruling improved life satisfaction for individuals, study shows
Human Development and Family Studies researchers at the University of Illinois intially wanted to understand how variation in state-level legislation and local community climate regarding same-sex marriage impacts the well-being and life satisfaction of same-sex couples across the US. (2019-02-27)
Your genes could impact the quality of your marriage
The quality of your marriage could be affected by your genes, according to new research conducted at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-02-11)
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