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Current Marriage News and Events, Marriage News Articles.
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BU finds PTSD nearly doubles infection risk
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study is the first to examine the relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dozens of infection types in a nationwide cohort. (2019-10-15)
Research highlights importance of religious vote amid changing social landscape
Canadians who consider religion to be important in their lives were still more likely to vote for the Conservative Party in 2015, finds new research from the University of Waterloo. (2019-10-15)
One way childhood trauma leads to poorer health for women
Researchers have long known that childhood trauma is linked to poorer health for women at midlife. (2019-09-17)
Married CEOs are more committed to social issues than non-married peers
Firms led by married CEOs were associated with significantly higher scores on a respected corporate social responsibility index. (2019-09-17)
New research sheds light on how happy couples argue
In marriage, conflict is inevitable. Even the happiest couples argue. (2019-09-16)
Bias against single people affects their cancer treatment
New research reveals the dangerous bias that's been buried in the fine print of academic and medical journals for more than 30 years. (2019-09-09)
Do unmarried women face shortages of partners in the US marriage market?
One explanation for declines in marriage is a shortage of economically-attractive men for unmarried women to marry. (2019-09-05)
Beliefs about uncommitted sex may put marriages at risk
An individual's behaviors and attitudes in relation to uncommitted sexual relationships, even before the marriage, can contribute to marital satisfaction or dissolution. (2019-09-05)
Religion associated with HPV vaccination rate for college women
A survey of female college students finds 25% had not been vaccinated for HPV and religion may be a contributing factor. (2019-08-19)
In difficult times, having multiple husbands can be an advantage
Researchers infer that women can buffer themselves against economic and social crises, and more effectively keep their children alive. (2019-08-14)
Does marital status affect prognosis after breast cancer diagnosis?
In a Cancer Medicine study of 298,434 patients diagnosed with breast cancer between 2004 and 2012, married patients had a better prognosis than patients who were single, who in turn had a better prognosis than those who were divorced, separated, or widowed. (2019-07-03)
CEO political activism -- Jobseekers want bosses who take a stand
Chief executives who speak out on political issues and take a principled stance are increasingly sought out by jobseekers who believe such behaviour signals fair treatment, respect for employees, and a more responsible vision beyond nurturing the bottom line, new research shows. (2019-07-03)
Why money cannot 'buy' housework
If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his partner will have her own bank account. (2019-06-24)
Parents of depressed teens in treatment may also benefit from counseling
Parents often seek mental health treatment for a child struggling with depression, but the treatment shouldn't stop with the depressed teen, suggests a new Northwestern Medicine study. (2019-06-06)
Teen pregnancy still a major challenge in India, strongly linked to child stunting
Children born to teenage mothers are more likely to be undernourished than children of adult mothers. (2019-05-16)
The enduring effects of mother-child interactions as children become adults
Interactions between a mother and her child have been linked to cognitive outcomes in childhood, but little work has looked at farther-reaching effects. (2019-05-09)
Short period of parental sexual contact prior to pregnancy increases offspring risk of schizophrenia
Mount Sinai study may help explain some of the excess risks for inflammatory diseases in first born children. (2019-04-23)
At last, acknowledging royal women's political power
Across the globe in a variety of societies, royal women found ways to advance the issues they cared about and advocate for the people important to them as detailed in a recent paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Research. (2019-04-16)
Relationship benefits can be seen in your eyes
BYU psychology professor Wendy Birmingham's lab used an infrared camera that measured pupil width to track people's response to stressful events in real-time. (2019-04-08)
Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization, study finds
In a study of 200 years of pre-industrial Quebecois genealogical history, researchers at Brown found that fertility-related changes in natural selection during the pre-industrial era paved the way for economic and technological progress. (2019-04-04)
Harvesting water energy using slippery surfaces
Inspired by natural pitcher plant surface that exhibits a peculiar slippery property, a novel slippery lubricant-impregnated porous surface (SLIPS) based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG), referred to as SLIPS-TENG, is developed to efficiently harvest energy from the most abundant, affordable resource, water. (2019-03-27)
Prenatal testosterone linked to long-term effects in females who share womb with male twin
Women who shared their mother's womb with a male twin are less likely to graduate from high school or college, have earned less by their early 30s, and have lower fertility and marriage rates when compared with twins who are both female, according to new Northwestern University research. (2019-03-18)
The world's adolescents -- large unmet needs and growing inequalities
The first detailed global study of adolescent health reveals: growing inequality with a large disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific, obesity rates have doubled, with countries in the Pacific region having among the highest prevalence, anemia remains unchecked, India bearing heavy burden, investments in health, education, legal systems have not kept pace with needs, and gender inequity is a powerful driver of poor adolescent health. (2019-03-12)
The Lancet: Disease, violence and inequality threaten more adolescents worldwide than ever before
In the first study to track recent global changes to adolescent health, published in The Lancet, researchers estimate that, compared with 1990, an additional 250 million adolescents in 2016 were living in countries where they faced a triple burden of infectious disease, non-communicable diseases including obesity, and injuries -- including from violence. (2019-03-12)
Mobile devices don't reduce shared family time, study finds
The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less -- but not in shared activities such as watching TV and eating. (2019-03-11)
The calypso caliphate: How Trinidad and Tobago became an ISIS recruiting hotspot
Research from the University of Kent has shed new light on individuals from Trinidad and Tobago that have traveled to Iraq and Syria to join ISIS since 2013, finding that they do not conform to the stereotypical Western view of an ISIS fighter. (2019-03-07)
Happy in marriage? Genetics may play a role
People fall in love for many reasons -- similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. (2019-02-28)
Federal same-sex marriage ruling improved life satisfaction for individuals, study shows
Human Development and Family Studies researchers at the University of Illinois intially wanted to understand how variation in state-level legislation and local community climate regarding same-sex marriage impacts the well-being and life satisfaction of same-sex couples across the US. (2019-02-27)
Your genes could impact the quality of your marriage
The quality of your marriage could be affected by your genes, according to new research conducted at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-02-11)
Study suggests shifts in Afghan attitudes towards increased education and delayed marriage
In Afghanistan's most underdeveloped regions, attitudes towards education and child marriage appear to have changed significantly since the overthrow of the Taliban government in 2002, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2018-12-18)
Study: Children of problem drinkers more likely to marry someone with a drinking problem
Children of parents who have alcohol use disorder are more likely to get married under the age of 25, less likely to get married later in life, and more likely to marry a person who has alcohol use disorder themselves, according to a new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and Lund University in Sweden. (2018-12-17)
Information on reproductive health outcomes lacking in Catholic hospitals
As Catholic health care systems expand nationwide, little is known about the reproductive outcomes of their patients compared to patients in other settings, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2018-12-06)
Mountain splendor? Scientists know where your eyes will look
Using precise brain measurements, Yale researchers predicted how people's eyes move when viewing natural scenes, an advance in understanding the human visual system that can improve a host of artificial intelligence efforts, such as the development of driverless cars. (2018-12-04)
As married couples age, humor replaces bickering
Honeymoon long over? Hang in there. A new University of California, Berkeley, study shows those prickly disagreements that can mark the early and middle years of marriage mellow with age as conflicts give way to humor and acceptance. (2018-12-03)
Ideal marriage partners drive Waorani warriors to war
In a new study, a team of researchers examined the social composition of raiding parties and their relationship to marriage alliances in an Amazonian tribal society, the Waorani of Ecuador. (2018-12-03)
Do local employment conditions affect women's pregnancy intentions?
Economic conditions can shape the decisions that adults make about their families, such as whether and when to have children. (2018-11-21)
Why your number of romantic partners mirrors your mother
A new national study shows that people whose mothers had more partners -- married or cohabiting -- often follow the same path. (2018-11-13)
Huge fall in prevalence of FGM/genital cutting among girls across Africa
The prevalence of female genital mutilation/cutting among girls up to the age of 14 has fallen sharply in most regions of Africa over the past three decades, reveals the first analysis of its kind, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2018-11-06)
From asexuality to heteroflexibility: New openness about intimate relationships
The 21st century has ushered in a ''quiet revolution'' in the diversity of intimate relationships, and a leading scholar says the scale and pace of this social transformation warrants a ''reboot'' of relationship studies. (2018-11-05)
Supplemental issue honors the life and scholarship of Nobel Laureate Gary S. Becker
A special supplement to the most recent issue of the Journal of Political Economy (JPE) (October 2018) commemorates the life and work of the late Nobel laureate Gary S. (2018-10-30)
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