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Current Marriage News and Events, Marriage News Articles.
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Does marital status affect prognosis after breast cancer diagnosis?
In a Cancer Medicine study of 298,434 patients diagnosed with breast cancer between 2004 and 2012, married patients had a better prognosis than patients who were single, who in turn had a better prognosis than those who were divorced, separated, or widowed. (2019-07-03)
CEO political activism -- Jobseekers want bosses who take a stand
Chief executives who speak out on political issues and take a principled stance are increasingly sought out by jobseekers who believe such behaviour signals fair treatment, respect for employees, and a more responsible vision beyond nurturing the bottom line, new research shows. (2019-07-03)
Why money cannot 'buy' housework
If a man is handy with the vacuum cleaner, isn't averse to rustling up a lush family meal most nights after he's put on the washing machine having popped into the supermarket on his way home then it's more than likely his partner will have her own bank account. (2019-06-24)
Parents of depressed teens in treatment may also benefit from counseling
Parents often seek mental health treatment for a child struggling with depression, but the treatment shouldn't stop with the depressed teen, suggests a new Northwestern Medicine study. (2019-06-06)
Teen pregnancy still a major challenge in India, strongly linked to child stunting
Children born to teenage mothers are more likely to be undernourished than children of adult mothers. (2019-05-16)
The enduring effects of mother-child interactions as children become adults
Interactions between a mother and her child have been linked to cognitive outcomes in childhood, but little work has looked at farther-reaching effects. (2019-05-09)
Short period of parental sexual contact prior to pregnancy increases offspring risk of schizophrenia
Mount Sinai study may help explain some of the excess risks for inflammatory diseases in first born children. (2019-04-23)
At last, acknowledging royal women's political power
Across the globe in a variety of societies, royal women found ways to advance the issues they cared about and advocate for the people important to them as detailed in a recent paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Research. (2019-04-16)
Relationship benefits can be seen in your eyes
BYU psychology professor Wendy Birmingham's lab used an infrared camera that measured pupil width to track people's response to stressful events in real-time. (2019-04-08)
Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization, study finds
In a study of 200 years of pre-industrial Quebecois genealogical history, researchers at Brown found that fertility-related changes in natural selection during the pre-industrial era paved the way for economic and technological progress. (2019-04-04)
Harvesting water energy using slippery surfaces
Inspired by natural pitcher plant surface that exhibits a peculiar slippery property, a novel slippery lubricant-impregnated porous surface (SLIPS) based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG), referred to as SLIPS-TENG, is developed to efficiently harvest energy from the most abundant, affordable resource, water. (2019-03-27)
Prenatal testosterone linked to long-term effects in females who share womb with male twin
Women who shared their mother's womb with a male twin are less likely to graduate from high school or college, have earned less by their early 30s, and have lower fertility and marriage rates when compared with twins who are both female, according to new Northwestern University research. (2019-03-18)
The world's adolescents -- large unmet needs and growing inequalities
The first detailed global study of adolescent health reveals: growing inequality with a large disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific, obesity rates have doubled, with countries in the Pacific region having among the highest prevalence, anemia remains unchecked, India bearing heavy burden, investments in health, education, legal systems have not kept pace with needs, and gender inequity is a powerful driver of poor adolescent health. (2019-03-12)
The Lancet: Disease, violence and inequality threaten more adolescents worldwide than ever before
In the first study to track recent global changes to adolescent health, published in The Lancet, researchers estimate that, compared with 1990, an additional 250 million adolescents in 2016 were living in countries where they faced a triple burden of infectious disease, non-communicable diseases including obesity, and injuries -- including from violence. (2019-03-12)
Mobile devices don't reduce shared family time, study finds
The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less -- but not in shared activities such as watching TV and eating. (2019-03-11)
The calypso caliphate: How Trinidad and Tobago became an ISIS recruiting hotspot
Research from the University of Kent has shed new light on individuals from Trinidad and Tobago that have traveled to Iraq and Syria to join ISIS since 2013, finding that they do not conform to the stereotypical Western view of an ISIS fighter. (2019-03-07)
Happy in marriage? Genetics may play a role
People fall in love for many reasons -- similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. (2019-02-28)
Federal same-sex marriage ruling improved life satisfaction for individuals, study shows
Human Development and Family Studies researchers at the University of Illinois intially wanted to understand how variation in state-level legislation and local community climate regarding same-sex marriage impacts the well-being and life satisfaction of same-sex couples across the US. (2019-02-27)
Your genes could impact the quality of your marriage
The quality of your marriage could be affected by your genes, according to new research conducted at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-02-11)
Study suggests shifts in Afghan attitudes towards increased education and delayed marriage
In Afghanistan's most underdeveloped regions, attitudes towards education and child marriage appear to have changed significantly since the overthrow of the Taliban government in 2002, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2018-12-18)
Study: Children of problem drinkers more likely to marry someone with a drinking problem
Children of parents who have alcohol use disorder are more likely to get married under the age of 25, less likely to get married later in life, and more likely to marry a person who has alcohol use disorder themselves, according to a new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and Lund University in Sweden. (2018-12-17)
Information on reproductive health outcomes lacking in Catholic hospitals
As Catholic health care systems expand nationwide, little is known about the reproductive outcomes of their patients compared to patients in other settings, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2018-12-06)
Mountain splendor? Scientists know where your eyes will look
Using precise brain measurements, Yale researchers predicted how people's eyes move when viewing natural scenes, an advance in understanding the human visual system that can improve a host of artificial intelligence efforts, such as the development of driverless cars. (2018-12-04)
As married couples age, humor replaces bickering
Honeymoon long over? Hang in there. A new University of California, Berkeley, study shows those prickly disagreements that can mark the early and middle years of marriage mellow with age as conflicts give way to humor and acceptance. (2018-12-03)
Ideal marriage partners drive Waorani warriors to war
In a new study, a team of researchers examined the social composition of raiding parties and their relationship to marriage alliances in an Amazonian tribal society, the Waorani of Ecuador. (2018-12-03)
Do local employment conditions affect women's pregnancy intentions?
Economic conditions can shape the decisions that adults make about their families, such as whether and when to have children. (2018-11-21)
Why your number of romantic partners mirrors your mother
A new national study shows that people whose mothers had more partners -- married or cohabiting -- often follow the same path. (2018-11-13)
Huge fall in prevalence of FGM/genital cutting among girls across Africa
The prevalence of female genital mutilation/cutting among girls up to the age of 14 has fallen sharply in most regions of Africa over the past three decades, reveals the first analysis of its kind, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2018-11-06)
From asexuality to heteroflexibility: New openness about intimate relationships
The 21st century has ushered in a ''quiet revolution'' in the diversity of intimate relationships, and a leading scholar says the scale and pace of this social transformation warrants a ''reboot'' of relationship studies. (2018-11-05)
Supplemental issue honors the life and scholarship of Nobel Laureate Gary S. Becker
A special supplement to the most recent issue of the Journal of Political Economy (JPE) (October 2018) commemorates the life and work of the late Nobel laureate Gary S. (2018-10-30)
Refugee girls gain from effort to teach life skills
A yearlong program for adolescent girl refugees in Sub-Saharan Africa successfully promoted healthy transitions to adulthood within the evaluation period, according to the results of randomized controlled trials in Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. (2018-10-22)
Checked off 'the talk' with your teen? Not so fast: Once isn't enough
New BYU research shows that one vague conversation with your teen about sex is not enough. (2018-10-01)
WSU researchers develop sugar-powered sensor to detect, prevent disease
Researchers at Washington State University have developed an implantable, biofuel-powered sensor that runs on sugar and can monitor a body's biological signals to detect, prevent and diagnose diseases. (2018-09-27)
UC political scientist reveals surprising answers about religious freedom
Can political conservatives accept inclusive religious freedom rights when viewing similar issues from another perspective? (2018-09-27)
Is student debt keeping Americans away from marriage?
Having a student loan could influence whether America's young adults first union after college is marriage or cohabitation. (2018-09-26)
Disaster leaves unexpected impact on rural Japan's marriage migrants
The devastating 2011 tsunami that struck the northeast of Japan led to a surprising outcome -- empowering some migrant women, while further isolating others. (2018-09-04)
How ugly marital spats might open the door to disease
Married people who fight nastily are more likely to suffer from leaky guts -- a problem that unleashes bacteria into the blood and can drive up disease-causing inflammation, new research suggests. (2018-08-15)
'Unreasonable behaviour' most common ground for divorce (new research suggests)
A new Oxford University study charts the changes in the main 'facts' that husbands and wives give for petitioning for divorce, since the Divorce Reform Act 1969 was implemented in 1971. (2018-07-30)
US sexual minorities less likely to be in work or insured than straight peers
Sexual minorities in the US are less likely to be in work or to have health insurance than their straight peers, reveal the results of a large survey, published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2018-07-26)
Blindness gene discovered
Researchers from UNIGE have investigated a recessive genetic disorder that destroys the eyes from developing and results in childhood blindness. (2018-07-23)
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