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Current Mass spectrometry News and Events

Current Mass spectrometry News and Events, Mass spectrometry News Articles.
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A new tool makes it possible to adapt treatment for patients with cardiogenic shock
Cardiogenic shock is a possible complication of serious heart attack involving an associated mortality rate of approximately 50% of all cases. (2019-06-17)
Do video games drive obesity?
Are children, teenagers and adults who spend a lot of time playing video games really more obese? (2019-06-17)
Artificial nose identifies malignant tissue in brain tumours during surgery
An artificial nose developed at Tampere University, Finland, helps neurosurgeons to identify cancerous tissue during surgery and enables the more precise excision of tumours. (2019-06-14)
Excess weight and body fat cause cardiovascular disease
In the first Mendelian randomization study to look at this, researchers have found evidence that excess weight and body fat cause a range of heart and blood vessel diseases (rather than just being associated with it). (2019-06-13)
Ancient pots from Chinese tombs reveal early use of cannabis as a drug
Chemical analysis of several wooden braziers recently excavated from tombs in western China provides some of earliest evidence for ritual cannabis smoking, researchers report. (2019-06-12)
The origins of cannabis smoking: Marijuana use in the first millennium BC
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in the Pamir Mountains of western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. (2019-06-12)
New look at old data leads to cleaner engines
New insights about how to understand and ultimately control the chemistry of ignition behavior and pollutant formation have been discovered in research led by Sandia National Laboratories. (2019-06-10)
iPhone plus nanoscale porous silicon equals cheap, simple home diagnostics
A Vanderbilt researchers is combining her research on low-cost, nanostructured thin films with a device most American adults already own. (2019-06-10)
Fishing a line coupled with clockwork for daily rhythm
Cells harbor molecular clocks that generate a circadian oscillation of about 24 h. (2019-06-06)
The mystery of the galaxy with no dark matter: Solved!
A group of researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has clarified one of the mysteries of 2018 in the field of extragalactic astrophysics: the supposed existence of a galaxy without dark matter. (2019-06-06)
Verifying 'organic' foods
Organic foods are increasingly popular -- and pricey. Organic fruits and vegetables are grown without synthetic pesticides, and because of that, they are often perceived to be more healthful than those grown with these substances. (2019-06-05)
New method for engineering metabolic pathways
Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules. (2019-06-05)
High body fat (but not BMI itself) linked to four-fold increase in mortality risk after heart bypass surgery
New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Vienna, Austria (June 1-3, 2019) shows that mortality in patients who had undergone heart bypass surgery was over 4 times higher in individuals with a high body fat mass, while body mass index (BMI) by itself was not associated with an increase in mortality. (2019-06-02)
Ancient feces reveal parasites in 8,000-year-old village of Çatalhöyük
Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms in the ancient inhabitants of Turkey shows whipworm infected this population of prehistoric farmers. (2019-05-31)
Cancer-fighting combination targets glioblastoma
An international team of researchers combined a calorie-restricted diet high in fat and low in carbohydrates with a tumor-inhibiting antibiotic and found the combination destroys cancer stem cells and mesenchymal cells, the two major cells found in glioblastoma, a fast-moving brain cancer that resists traditional treatment protocols. (2019-05-30)
Compostable food containers could release PFAS into environment
Compostable food containers seem like a great idea: They degrade into nutrient-rich organic matter, reducing waste and the need for chemical fertilizers. (2019-05-29)
Artificial intelligence boosts proteome research
Using artificial intelligence, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in making the mass analysis of proteins from any organism significantly faster than before and almost error-free. (2019-05-29)
Stiffening arteries in teenagers with persistent obesity
Children and adolescents with long-term obesity have increased arterial stiffness by their late teens, a study of more than 3,000 children followed from age 9 to 17 shows. (2019-05-28)
Progress in hunt for unknown compounds in drinking water
When we drink a glass of water, we ingest an unknown amount of by-products that are formed in the treatment process. (2019-05-23)
Ancient proteins offer clues to the past
Archeologists once relied solely on artifacts, such as skeletal remains, fossils and pottery sherds, to learn about past species and cultures. (2019-05-22)
Melting small glaciers could add 10 inches to sea levels
A new review of glacier research data paints a picture of a future planet with a lot less ice and a lot more water. (2019-05-22)
New measurement device: Carbon dioxide as geothermometer
For the first time it is possible to measure, simultaneously and with extreme precision, four rare molecular variants of carbon dioxide (CO2) using a novel laser instrument. (2019-05-20)
Children who walk to school less likely to be overweight or obese, study suggests
Children who regularly walk or cycle to school are less likely to be overweight or obese than those who travel by car or public transport, a new study suggests. (2019-05-19)
Development of a displacement sensor to measure gravity of smallest source mass ever
One of the most unknown phenomena in modern physics is gravity. (2019-05-17)
Ragweed compounds could protect nerve cells from Alzheimer's
As spring arrives in the northern hemisphere, many people are cursing ragweed, a primary culprit in seasonal allergies. (2019-05-15)
Whole grain can contribute to health by changing intestinal serotonin production
Adults consuming whole grain rye have lower plasma serotonin levels than people eating low-fibre wheat bread, according to a recent study by the University of Eastern Finland and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). (2019-05-13)
Secrets of fluorescent microalgae could lead to super-efficient solar cells
Tiny light-emitting microalgae, found in the ocean, could hold the secret to the next generation of organic solar cells, according to new research carried out at the universities of Birmingham and Utrecht. (2019-05-09)
New method developed to detect and trace homemade bombs
Researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with Northumbria University, have developed a new way of detecting homemade explosives which will help forensic scientists trace where it came from. (2019-05-09)
Understanding the power of honey through its proteins
Honey is a culinary staple that can be found in kitchens around the world. (2019-05-08)
Ancient ritual bundle contained multiple psychotropic plants
A thousand years ago, Native Americans in South America used multiple psychotropic plants -- possibly simultaneously -- to induce hallucinations and altered consciousness, according to an international team of anthropologists. (2019-05-06)
Ayahuasca fixings found in 1,000-year-old bundle in the Andes
Today's hipster creatives and entrepreneurs are hardly the first generation to partake of ayahuasca, according to archaeologists who have discovered traces of the powerfully hallucinogenic potion in a 1,000-year-old leather bundle buried in a cave in the Bolivian Andes. (2019-05-06)
A simple solution to a complex problem
Freiburg researchers use a novel approach to identify a transport protein in mycobacteria. (2019-04-29)
Injections, exercise promote muscle regrowth after atrophy in mice, study finds
By injecting cells that support blood vessel growth into muscles depleted by inactivity, researchers say they are able to help restore muscle mass lost as a result of immobility. (2019-04-25)
Tomato, tomat-oh! -- understanding evolution to reduce pesticide use
Although pesticides are a standard part of crop production, Michigan State University researchers believe pesticide use could be reduced by taking cues from wild plants. (2019-04-24)
New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones
A more efficient and cost-effective way to detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, could be possible with a new protein-based sensor that changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals. (2019-04-23)
Parboiling method reduces inorganic arsenic in rice
Contamination of rice with arsenic is a major problem in some regions of the world with high rice consumption. (2019-04-17)
New PFASs discovered in Cape Fear River, though levels are declining
In 2015, a fluorosurfactant known by the trade name 'GenX' made headlines when researchers discovered it and related compounds in the Cape Fear River of North Carolina, a source of drinking water for many residents of the area. (2019-04-17)
New study shows people used natural dyes to color their clothing thousands of years ago
Even thousands of years ago people wore clothing with colourful patterns made from plant and animal-based dyes. (2019-04-17)
Novel biomarkers for noninvasive diagnosis of NAFLD-related fibrosis
With an estimated 25% of people worldwide affected by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), there is a large unmet need for accurate, noninvasive measures to enhance early diagnosis and screening of hepatic fibrosis. (2019-04-16)
The fluid that feeds tumor cells
MIT biologists have found that the nutrient composition of the interstitial fluid that normally surrounds pancreatic tumors is different from that of the culture medium normally used to grow cancer cells. (2019-04-16)
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