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Current Mass spectrometry News and Events

Current Mass spectrometry News and Events, Mass spectrometry News Articles.
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APS tip sheet: First results from the Belle II experiment
The Belle II experiment reports its first measurements. (2020-04-06)
Oldest ever human genetic evidence clarifies dispute over our ancestors
Genetic information from an 800.000-year-old human fossil has been retrieved for the first time. (2020-04-01)
Reduced off-odor of plastic recyclates via separate collection of packaging waste
Plastic recyclates produced from waste packaging have to meet high sensory requirements in order to be used for new products. (2020-03-31)
Hubble finds best evidence for elusive mid-sized black hole
Astronomers have found the best evidence for the perpetrator of a cosmic homicide: a black hole of an elusive class known as ''intermediate-mass,'' which betrayed its existence by tearing apart a wayward star that passed too close. (2020-03-31)
Reducing reliance on nitrogen fertilizers with biological nitrogen fixation
Crop yields have increased substantially over the past decades, occurring alongside the increasing use of nitrogen fertilizer. (2020-03-26)
Pharma's potential impact on water quality
When people take medications, these drugs and their metabolites can be excreted and make their way to wastewater treatment plants. (2020-03-25)
Researchers invent method to unlock potential of widely used drug
The blood-thinning drug heparin is used all over the world. (2020-03-20)
New technology helps in hunt for new cancer drug combinations
A revolutionary new technology has been applied to reveal the inner workings of individual cancer cells - potentially identifying more effective treatment combinations for people with cancer. (2020-03-19)
Maggot analysis goes molecular for forensic cases
Maggots on a dead body or wound can help pinpoint when a person or animal died, or when maltreatment began in elder, child care or animal neglect cases. (2020-03-18)
Most mass shootings occur closest to hospitals without verification to treat trauma
In an analysis of 2019 mass shootings and hospital locations, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found that the closest hospital to more than 70% of mass shootings was a non-trauma center, where sudden, high casualty loads were more likely to overwhelm capacity and trauma-specific care options may have been limited. (2020-03-18)
3D hierarchically porous nanostructured catalyst helps efficiently reduce CO2?
KAIST researchers developed a three-dimensional (3D) hierarchically porous nanostructured catalyst with carbon dioxide (CO2) to carbon monoxide (CO) conversion rate up to 3.96 times higher than that of conventional nanoporous gold catalysts. (2020-03-13)
A molecular map for the plant sciences
Plants are essential for life on earth. They provide food for essentially all organisms, oxygen for breathing, and they regulate the climate of the planet. (2020-03-12)
Hair in 'stress': Analyze with care
Similar to humans, wild animals' reaction to disturbance is accompanied by releasing hormones, such as cortisol. (2020-03-12)
Detecting aromas in aged cognac
For connoisseurs of wines and spirits, part of the enjoyment is noting the various flavors and scents that are revealed with each sip. (2020-03-11)
Popular painkiller ibuprofen affects liver enzymes in mice
The popular painkiller ibuprofen may have more significant effects on the liver than previously thought, according to new research from UC Davis. (2020-03-11)
How intermittent fasting changes liver enzymes and helps prevent disease
Research on mice reveals the surprising impact on fat metabolism and the role played by a regulator protein in the liver. (2020-03-10)
Novel blood test points to risk of weight gain and diabetes
The blood test method makes use of machine learning and can be used to predict whether patients will put on weight, unless they change their habits. (2020-03-10)
Atomic fingerprint identifies emission sources of uranium
Depending on whether uranium is released by the civil nuclear industry or as fallout from nuclear weapon tests, the ratio of the two anthropogenic, i.e. man-made, uranium isotopes 233U and 236U varies. (2020-03-09)
Rapid DNA test quickly identifies victims of mass casualty event
To quickly identify victims of the 2018 Camp Fire, the deadliest wildfire in California's history, researchers used a technique called Rapid DNA Identification that can provide results within hours, compared with months to years required of conventional DNA analysis. (2020-03-04)
Moviegoers contaminate nonsmoking movie theater with 'thirdhand' cigarette smoke
Suggesting that current non-smoking regulations may not be enough to minimize nonsmokers' exposure to thirdhand cigarette smoke, researchers report that concentrations of nicotine and smoking-related volatile organic compounds spiked when moviegoers entered a well-ventilated, non-smoking movie theater, exposing them to the equivalent of between one and (2020-03-04)
Coordination chemistry and Alzheimer's disease
It has become evident recently that the interactions between copper and amyloid-β neurotoxically impact the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. (2020-03-03)
Why is an empty shampoo bottle so easy to knock over?
It becomes annoyingly easy to knock over a shampoo bottle when it's nearly empty. (2020-03-02)
Technology provides a new way to probe single molecules
A new technology called individual ion mass spectrometry, or I2MS, can determine the exact mass of a huge range of intact proteins. (2020-03-02)
Researchers announce progress in developing an accurate, noninvasive urine test for prostate cancer
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have made significant progress toward development of a simple, noninvasive liquid biopsy test that detects prostate cancer from RNA and other specific metabolic chemicals in the urine. (2020-02-28)
Zoology: Biofluorescence may be widespread among amphibians
Biofluorescence, where organisms emit a fluorescent glow after absorbing light energy, may be widespread in amphibians including salamanders and frogs, according to a study in Scientific Reports. (2020-02-27)
Discovery of entirely new class of RNA caps in bacteria
The group of Dr. Hana Cahová of the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS, in collaboration with scientists from the Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, has discovered an entirely new class of dinucleoside polyphosphate 5'RNA caps in bacteria and described the function of alarmones and their mechanism of function. (2020-02-26)
How resident microbes restructure body chemistry
A comparison of normal and germ-free mice revealed that as much as 70% of a mouse's gut chemistry is determined by its gut microbiome. (2020-02-26)
Synthesizing a superatom: Opening doors to their use as substitutes for elemental atoms
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and ERATO Japan Science and Technology have demonstrated how superatoms of a desired valency, stability, and volume can be synthesized in a solution medium by altering the number of atoms in a cluster structure. (2020-02-25)
Lipid signaling from beta cells can potentiate an inflammatory macrophage polarization
The insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas unwittingly produce a signal that may aid their own demise in Type 1 diabetes, according to a study of the lipid signals that drive macrophage cells in the body to two different phenotypes of activated immune cells. (2020-02-21)
A better pregnancy test for whales
To determine whale pregnancy, researchers have relied on visual cues or hormone tests of blubber collected via darts, but the results were often inconclusive. (2020-02-20)
Weed-derived compounds in Serbian groundwater could contribute to endemic kidney disease
People living in Balkan farming villages along the Danube River have long suffered from a unique type of kidney disease known as Balkan endemic nephropathy. (2020-02-19)
Reproductive genome from the laboratory
Max Planck researchers have for the first time developed a genome the size of a minimal cell that can copy itself. (2020-02-18)
Chemists use mass spectrometry tools to determine age of fingerprints
Chemists at Iowa State University may have solved a puzzle of forensic science: How do you determine the age of a fingerprint? (2020-02-18)
New UCL technology analyses single cancer cells in lab grown tumours
New technology developed at UCL is, for the first time, enabling cancer scientists to analyse the individual behaviour of millions of different cells living inside lab-grown tumours -- a breakthrough which could lead to new personalised cancer treatments. (2020-02-17)
Reconstructing the diet of fossil vertebrates
Paleodietary studies of the fossil record are impeded by a lack of reliable and unequivocal tracers. (2020-02-17)
Solar wind samples suggest new physics of massive solar ejections
A new study led by the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa has helped refine understanding of the amount of hydrogen, helium and other elements present in violent outbursts from the Sun, and other types of solar 'wind,' a stream of ionized atoms ejected from the Sun. (2020-02-14)
Prolonged use of hormone therapy may minimize muscle loss associated with aging
Skeletal muscle mass and strength are critical in helping prevent falls, fractures, and disability. (2020-02-12)
NIST researchers link quartz microbalance measurements to international measurement system
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have found a way to link measurements made by a device integral to microchip fabrication and other industries directly to the recently redefined International System of Units (SI, the modern metric system). (2020-02-12)
There's a twist in the story of volcanism & mass extinctions, say CCNY researchers
An emerging scientific consensus is that gases -- in particular carbon gases -- released by volcanic eruptions millions of years ago contributed to some of Earth's greatest mass extinctions. (2020-02-10)
Scientists show solar system processes control the carbon cycle throughout Earth's history
This new work sheds fresh light on the complicated interplay of factors affecting global climate and the carbon cycle -- and on what transpired millions of years ago to spark two of the most devastating extinction events in Earth's history. (2020-02-10)
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