Current Math News and Events

Current Math News and Events, Math News Articles.
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High achievement cultures may kill students' interest in math -- especially for girls
In countries where academic performance in math is high, students paradoxically tend to have lower levels of interest in the subject. A recent study suggests that this effect is even stronger among girls, potentially explaining why they tend to do slightly less well at math than their male peers in high-achieving countries. (2020-11-25)

A student's experience with math is affected by the composition of the group they are in
Weak students in high-performing math classes, especially boys, feel more shame compared to students in low-performing math classes. Stronger students, in turn, feel more bored and enjoy mathematics less in high-performing math classes, according to a new study. (2020-11-17)

Conflicts in kindergarten can reduce children's interest in reading and math
Teacher-perceived conflict predicts lower interest and pre-academic skills in math and literacy among kindergarteners, a new study from Finland shows. (2020-11-05)

How parental involvement affects children's performance in school
Using data from the HSE University longitudinal study Trajectories in Education and Careers (TrEC), Ilya Prakhov, Olga Kotomina and Alexandra Sazhina determined which forms of family engagement in the school are useful and which are harmful to the student. The study was published in International Journal of Educational Development. (2020-11-05)

Starting kindergarten on the right foot
Going into kindergarten already well-prepared gives a child advantagesgives a child many advantages later in life and lowers costs for society in the long term, researchers in Canada find. (2020-11-02)

How genetic variation gives rise to differences in mathematical ability
DNA variation in a gene called ROBO1 is associated with early anatomical differences in a brain region that plays a key role in quantity representation, potentially explaining how genetic variability might shape mathematical performance in children, according to a study published October 22nd in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Michael Skeide of the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, and colleagues. (2020-10-22)

How is STEM children's programming prioritizing diversity?
The first large-scale analysis of characters featured in STEM-related educational programming revealed that of the characters appearing in STEM television programming for kids ages 3 to 6, Latinx and females are left behind. (2020-10-16)

Facemask use has lesser consequences on indicators of cognitive performance than expected
A novel study shows that facemask use does not affect indicators of cognitive performance when the wearers are resting or performing moderate physical work in hot environments. However, wearing a facemask does make it more difficult to breathe when performing moderate physical work in a hot environment. The study is conducted by researchers at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen in collaboration with the European research consortium 'HEAT-SHIELD'. (2020-10-07)

How long does the preschool advantage last?
Children who attend preschool enter kindergarten with greater skills than those who don't, but that advantage is nearly halved by the end of the year as their counterparts quickly begin to catch up, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-10-05)

Online training helps preemies
An international team of researchers has now found that computerised training can support preterm children's academic success. In their randomised controlled study ''Fit for School'', the researchers compared two learning apps. The project at the University Hospital Essen and at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum was funded by Mercator Research Center Ruhr (Mercur) with approximately 300,000 Euros for four years. Results have been published online as unedited manuscript in the journal Pediatric Research on 12 September 2020. (2020-09-21)

Homicides near schools affect students' educational outcomes
Homicides near schools negatively impact on the educational attainment of children, a new study in the Journal of Labor Economics reports. (2020-09-21)

Researchers got busy: After nearly allowing the solution to a math riddle
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) thought that they were five years away from solving a math riddle from the 1980's. In reality, and without knowing, they had nearly cracked the problem and had just given away much of the solution in a research article. The solution could be used to improve tomorrow's phones and computers. (2020-08-17)

Invisible barriers cut down on cheating
Both see-through and pretend partitions promoted honesty in taking tests, psychology experiments show, suggesting simple environmental cues can nudge children to do the right thing. (2020-07-27)

"Winter is coming": The influence of seasonality on pathogen emergence
Seasonal fluctuations drive the dynamics of many infectious diseases. For instance, the flu spreads more readily in winter. Two scientists from the University of Nantes and the CNRS in Montpellier have developed a mathematical model to predict the risk of the emergence of an epidemic, depending on the time of the year at which the pathogen is introduced. (2020-07-21)

Study: More than half of US students experience summer learning losses five years in a row
Following U.S. students across five summers between grades 1 and 6, a little more than half (52 percent) experienced learning losses in all five summers, according to a large national study published today. Students in this group lost an average of 39 percent of their total school year gains during each summer. (2020-07-09)

Early childhood education centers can boost parents' engagement at home
When early childhood education centers communicate well with parents, those parents are more likely to engage in educational activities with their children at home, a new University of Arizona study finds. (2020-07-07)

Gender gaps in STEM college majors emerge in high school
Although studies have shown that women are more likely than men to enter and complete college in U.S. higher education, women are less likely to earn degrees in science, technology, engineering and math fields. In new research, Kim Weeden, the Jan Rock Zubrow '77 Professor of the Social Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Cornell University, traces the discrepancy in college majors back to gender differences that emerge early in high school. (2020-07-02)

Airborne chemicals could become less hazardous, thanks to a missing math formula
Purdue researchers have figured out a way to calculate surface viscosity just by looking at a stretched droplet as it starts to break. (2020-06-25)

Smokers good at math are more likely to want to quit
For smokers who are better at math, the decision to quit just adds up, a new study suggests. Researchers found that smokers who scored higher on a test of math ability were more likely than others to say they intended to quit smoking. (2020-06-22)

Achievement isn't why more men are majoring in physics, engineering and computer science
Researchers at New York University's Steinhardt School found that the reason there are more undergraduate men than women majoring in physics, engineering and computer science is not because men are higher achievers. On the contrary, the scholars found that men with very low high-school GPAs in math and science and very low SAT math scores were choosing these math-intensive majors just as often as women with much higher math and science achievement. (2020-06-18)

NUI Galway mathematician publishes article in world's top mathematics journal
An Irish mathematician, Dr Martin Kerin, from the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics at NUI Galway, has had a research article published in the Annals of Mathematics, widely regarded as the top journal for pure mathematics in the world. The article resolves a question ?rst asked around 60 years ago on the geometrical properties of seven-dimensional objects which very closely resemble spheres. (2020-05-28)

New model gives wineries better data from existing tests
WSU scientists present a new model that allows winemakers to get measurements in their wine that previously required difficult, tedious, or expensive testing. (2020-05-18)

Visual-spatial learning disorder is more common than thought, finds study
Columbia University researchers estimate non-verbal learning disorder may affect up to 3 million children in the United States. (2020-04-28)

New model finds countries should work together to control coronavirus, harmful species
Countries looking to contain the spread of harmful species and diseases like COVID-19 should work together in multiple hotspots, according to a new model developed by an Arizona State University researcher. (2020-04-13)

Sorry, Einstein: Hard workers may make better role models than geniuses
Role models are important for aspiring scientists, but new research suggests that scientists who are known for their hard work -- like Thomas Edison -- are more motivating than scientists who are viewed as naturally brilliant, like Albert Einstein. (2020-03-11)

Not a 'math person'? You may be better at learning to code than you think
New research from the University of Washington finds that a natural aptitude for learning languages is a stronger predictor of learning to program than basic math knowledge. (2020-03-02)

Quantifying objects: bees recognize that six is more than four
A new study at the University of Cologne proves that insects can perform basic numerical cognition tasks. Their neuronal network can also be used to perform successful machine learning. (2020-03-02)

Speak math, not code
Writing algorithms in mathematics rather than code is not only more elegant but also more efficient, says 2013 Turing Award winner Leslie Lamport. (2020-03-01)

Socially assistive robot helps children with autism learn
Researchers at USC's Department of Computer Science have developed personalized learning robots for children with autism. They also studied whether the robots could estimate a child's interest in a task using machine learning. (2020-02-27)

Synthesis considers how being smart helps you at school and school helps you become smarter
Academic achievement plays an important role in children's development because academic skills, especially in reading and math, affect many outcomes, including educational attainment, performance and income at work, health, and longevity. A new synthesis looked at the relation between academic achievement (reading, math) and cognitive abilities (working memory, reasoning, executive function), and offered suggestions on how to improve educational and cognitive outcomes. (2020-01-28)

Weighing more than your twin at birth may predict better achievement at school
Research has shown that children who are born at a low birthweight are less likely to do well in school and more likely to live in lower-income neighborhoods as adults. A new study of twins looked at the effect of birthweight on children's cognitive and socioemotional outcomes at 4 years old, taking into account families' socioeconomic status (SES). (2020-01-28)

Math that feels good
Mathematics and science Braille textbooks are expensive and require an enormous effort to produce -- until now. A team of researchers has developed a method for easily creating textbooks in Braille, with an initial focus on math textbooks. The new process is made possible by a new authoring system which serves as a 'universal translator' for textbook formats. Based on this new method, the production of Braille textbooks will become easy, inexpensive, and widespread. (2020-01-16)

Math test score gap between white and non-white students in Brazil due to complex factors
School test scores often show gaps in performance between white and non-white students. Understanding the complex reasons behind this can help reduce those gaps and promote social equality, explains Mary Paula Arends-Kuenning, associate professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois. (2020-01-02)

APS tip sheet: Modeling supermarket traffic jams
Modeling supermarket layouts could help reduce aisle congestion. (2019-12-18)

'I will do my very best!' Children who engage in positive self-talk about effort can boost their math achievement
Children who think poorly of themselves often underachieve in school. A new Dutch study tested whether a simple mental activity -- having children with low self-confidence say favorable, encouraging words to themselves -- could boost their achievement. The study found that children who engaged in this kind of self-talk improved their math performance when the talk focused on effort, not ability. (2019-12-17)

Students do better in school when they can understand, manage emotions
Students who are better able to understand and manage their emotions effectively, a skill known as emotional intelligence, do better at school than their less skilled peers, as measured by grades and standardized test scores, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-12-12)

Water animation gets easier thanks to BYU professors
A team of computer science professors at BYU created a method to quickly resize animations of fluids without having to completely re-simulate the entire sequence. (2019-12-05)

Study: Young children can learn math skills from intelligent virtual characters
A new study examined whether young children's verbal engagement with an onscreen interactive media character could boost their math skills. The study concluded that children's parasocial (that is, one-sided) emotional relationships with the intelligent character and their parasocial interactions (in this case, talking about math with the character) led to quicker, more accurate math responses during virtual game play. (2019-11-20)

Study finds brains of girls and boys are similar, producing equal math ability
Jessica Cantlon at Carnegie Mellon University led a research team that comprehensively examined the brain development of young boys and girls. Their research shows no gender difference in brain function or math ability. (2019-11-08)

A mathematical model reveals long-distance cell communication mechanism
An interdisciplinary collaborative team at KAIST has identified how a large community can communicate with each other almost simultaneously even with very short distance signaling. (2019-10-15)

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