Current Mathematical model News and Events

Current Mathematical model News and Events, Mathematical model News Articles.
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Air-sea coupling improves the simulation of the western North Pacific summer monsoon in the WRF4 model at a synoptic scale resolving resolution
Air-sea coupling improves the simulation of the western North Pacific summer monsoon in the WRF4 model at a synoptic scale resolving resolution (2020-11-25)

RUDN University research team of mathematicians suggested a new decision making algorithm
A research team from RUDN University developed an algorithm to help large groups of people make optimal decisions in a short time. They confirmed the efficiency of their model using the example of the market at which the outbreak of COVID-19 began. The model helped the administration and sellers agree on closing the market and reach a consensus about the sums of compensations in just three steps. (2020-11-25)

Scientists apply the METRIC model to estimate the land surface evapotranspiration in Nepal
Scientists apply the METRIC model to estimate the land surface evapotranspiration in Nepal (2020-11-24)

Quantum magic squares
The magic of mathematics is particularly reflected in magic squares. Recently, quantum physicist Gemma De las Cuevas and mathematicians Tim Netzer and Tom Drescher introduced the notion of the quantum magic square, and for the first time studied in detail the properties of this quantum version of magic squares. (2020-11-24)

COVID-19 cases could nearly double before Biden takes office
President-elect Joe Biden has signaled that fighting the COVID-19 pandemic will be an immediate priority for his administration. But Inauguration Day is still two months away. The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases are likely to increase to 20 million by the end of January, nearly doubling the current level of 11.4 million cases, predicts a Washington University in St. Louis COVID-19 forecasting model. (2020-11-23)

A new beat in quantum matter
Oscillatory behaviors are ubiquitous in Nature, ranging from the orbits of planets to the periodic motion of a swing. In pure crystalline systems, presenting a perfect spatially-periodic structure, the fundamental laws of quantum physics predict a remarkable and counter-intuitive oscillatory behavior: when subjected to a weak electric force, the electrons in the material do not undergo a net drift, but rather oscillate in space, a phenomenon known as Bloch oscillations. (2020-11-23)

Enriching research in ecology and evolution through nine 'flavors' of history
In a recent article in The Quarterly Review of Biology, ''Beyond Equilibria: The Neglected Role of History in Ecology and Evolution,'' author Hamish G. Spencer argues for a revitalized view of history. This historical view is a response to current research in the field of ecology and evolution, which is dominated by an ahistorical view of dynamic systems. (2020-11-23)

Deep learning in the emergency department
Harnessing the power of deep learning leads to better predictions of patient admissions and flow in emergency departments (2020-11-22)

Minuscule migrations
Cells move constantly throughout our bodies, performing myriad operations critical to tissue development, immune responses and general wellbeing. This bustle is guided by chemical cues long studied by scientists interested in cellular migration. (2020-11-20)

Biophysics - geometry supersedes simulations
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists have introduced a new method that allows biological pattern-forming systems to be systematically characterized with the aid of mathematical analysis. The trick lies in the use of geometry to characterize the dynamics. (2020-11-20)

Building better diffusion models for active systems
Research published in EPJ E has led to new theories detailing how some unusual diffusion behaviours can be reproduced in generalised mathematical models. (2020-11-19)

COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness to be affected heavily by infrastructure, public attitudes
The success of a COVID-19 vaccine will depend not only on its efficacy, but will hinge at least as much on how fast and widely it can be delivered, the severity of the pandemic, and the public's willingness to be immunized, according to a study published in Health Affairs. (2020-11-19)

UIC researchers describe fundamental processes behind movement of magnetic particles
Researchers from the University of Illinois Chicago describe several fundamental processes associated with the motion of magnetic particles through fluids as they are pulled by a magnetic field. (2020-11-18)

New understanding of mobility paves way for tomorrow's transport systems
Researchers at DTU and the University of Copenhagen have developed a ground-breaking model that provides a completely new understanding of our movement patterns. The model can come to play an important role when designing tomorrow's green modes of transport and has just been published in Nature. (2020-11-18)

Dynamic risk management in cell populations
Scientists at AMOLF and Yale report the discovery of a mechanism that enables cell populations to tune their diversity much faster, by a combination of physical and chemical interactions between existing proteins. (2020-11-13)

Possible 1,000-kilometer-long river running deep below Greenland's ice sheet
Computational models suggest that melting water originating in the deep interior of Greenland could flow the entire length of a subglacial valley and exit at Petermann Fjord, along the northern coast of the island. Updating ice sheet models with this open valley could provide additional insight for future climate change predictions. (2020-11-12)

Low speed on a bumpy road is dangerous for vehicle body, says a RUDN University professor
An associate professor from RUDN University developed a computer model that describes all types of vehicle body damage caused by fatigue failure. According to his computer simulation, low speed on bumpy roads can be more dangerous for a vehicle body than moderate. The results of the study can help measure fatigue resistance in vehicles more accurately. (2020-11-12)

Intelligent surfaces signal better coverage
A mathematical model shows specialized reflective panels could be deployed on a large scale to enhance communication networks in urban areas. (2020-11-11)

Modelling microswimmers for drug delivery
An international group of theoretical physicists led by Abdallah Daddi-Moussa-Ider from Düsseldorf, Germany, has modelled the motion of microscopic, motile bodies - either powered micro-machines or living cells - in viscous liquid drops, using the Navier-Stokes equations. This work, which has applications in materials science and medicine, is now published in EPJ E. (2020-11-11)

Sticky electrons: When repulsion turns into attraction
Scientists in Vienna explain what happens at a strange 'border line' in materials science: Under certain conditions, materials change from well-known behaviour to different, partly unexplained phenomena. This can be explained by the emergence of attractive forces, counteracting the repulsion between electrons. (2020-11-10)

New black hole merger simulations could help power next-gen gravitational wave detectors
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed new simulations of black holes with widely varying masses merging that could help power the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. RIT Professor Carlos Lousto and Research Associate James Healy from RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences outline these record-breaking simulations in a new Physical Review Letters paper. (2020-11-09)

Peering under the "hood" of SARS-CoV-2
Microscope and protein data are incorporated into an easy-to-use-and-update tool that can model an organism's 3D appearance. (2020-11-08)

Social distancing may have saved more than 59,000 u.s. Lives if implemented two weeks earlier
Implementing social distancing, business closures, and other non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) in the U.S. two weeks sooner, during the earliest stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, may have (2020-11-06)

RUDN University physicist developed software solution to measure the black holes stability
Even if a black hole can be described with a mathematical model, it doesn't mean it exists in reality. Some theoretical models are unstable: though they can be used to run mathematical calculations, from the point of view of physics they make no sense. A physicist from RUDN University developed an approach to finding such instability regions. (2020-11-05)

Nervous systems of insects inspire efficient future AI systems
Study explores functions of fruit fly's nervous system in food seeking / results valuable for the development and control of artificial intelligence. (2020-11-05)

Understanding the spread of infectious diseases
Physicists at Münster University (Germany) have shown in model simulations that the COVID-19 infection rates decrease significantly through social distancing. For this, they combined the dynamical density functional theory to describe interacting particles and the SIR model, a theory to describe the spread of infectious diseases. (2020-11-04)

Water-energy nanogrid provides solution for rural communities lacking basic amenities
Researchers at Texas A&M University have come up with an economical, green solution that can help underprivileged communities with their water and electricity needs. (2020-11-04)

Researchers show how to target a shape-shifting protein in Alzheimer's disease
A new study suggests that it is possible to design drugs that can target a type of shape-shifting protein involved in Alzheimer's disease, which was previously thought to be undruggable. (2020-11-04)

Students develop tool to predict the carbon footprint of algorithms
Within the scientific community, it is estimated that artificial intelligence -- otherwise meant to serve as a means to effectively combat climate change -- will become one of the most egregious CO2 culprits should current trends continue. To raise awareness about the challenge, two University of Copenhagen students have launched a tool to calculate the carbon footprint of developing deep learning models. (2020-11-03)

A new mathematical front to understand species coexistence
In an effort to understand how different species coexist, researchers develop a mathematical model that establishes interactions in co-colonization as the key. The study, published in the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, links epidemiology, ecology and evolution and models host colonization by different microbial species, providing fundamental advances for the analysis of species coexistence and the understanding of biodiversity. (2020-11-03)

Mathematical modeling of processes in neurons to assist the treatment of epilepsy and depression
Researchers study the effect of neural stimulation by ultrasonic waves and analyzing the influence of ultrasonic wave parameters on the excitation of electrical signals in the nerves. The obtained results have a great practical value for further studies related to the issues of human brain modeling. (2020-11-02)

Covid-19 "super-spreading" events play outsized role in overall disease transmission
MIT researchers find Covid-19 super-spreading events, in which one person infects more than six other people, are much more frequent than anticipated, and that they have an outsized contribution to coronavirus transmission. (2020-11-02)

Disease-transmission model forecasts election outcomes
To simulate how interactions between voters may play a role in the upcoming presidential, gubernatorial and senatorial elections, a Northwestern University research team is adapting a model that is commonly used to study infectious diseases. (2020-10-29)

Habitat loss is bad news for species - especially for top predators
Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, have simulated what happens in ecosystems when the habitats of different species disappear. When plants and animals lose their habitats, predator species at the top of the food chain die out first. The results have been published in Ecology Letters, and may provide information for and strengthen initiatives to preserve biodiversity. (2020-10-28)

Forecasting elections with a model of infectious diseases
Election forecasting is an innately challenging endeavor, with results that can be difficult to interpret and may leave many questions unanswered after close races unfold. In a paper publishing in SIAM Review, researchers borrowed ideas from epidemiology to develop a new method for forecasting elections. The team hoped the multidisciplinary nature of their infectious disease model could expand the community that engages with polling data and raise research questions from a new perspective. (2020-10-28)

Large tides may have driven evolution of fish towards life on land
Big tidal ranges some 400 million years ago may have initiated the evolution of bony fish and land vertebrates. This theory is now supported by researchers in the UK and at Uppsala University who, for the first time, have used established mathematical models to simulate tides on Earth during this period. The study has been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A. (2020-10-27)

Destroying cancer cells with non-surgical ultrasound treatment
Dr. Ki Joo Pahk's research team at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Center for Bionics confirmed the possibility of precisely fractionating target tumor cells, as though it is cut out using a knife, without causing heat damage to any other part of the body by using high-intensity focused ultrasound. (2020-10-26)

Estimating risk of airborne COVID-19 with mask usage, social distancing
In Physics of Fluids, researchers used a model to understand airborne transmission that is designed to be accessible to a wide range of people, including nonscientists. Employing concepts of fluid dynamics and factors in airborne transmission, they propose the Contagion Airborne Transmission inequality model. While not all factors may be known, it can still be used to assess relative risks. The researchers determined protection from transmission increases with physical distancing in an approximately linear proportion. (2020-10-26)

How to figure out what you don't know
Sometimes, what seems like a good way to explain the world--a model--turns out to be wrong. CSHL machine learning researchers developed a way to find the best answers to complicated questions, rather than answers that only appear to be right when tested in a few ways. (2020-10-26)

New model predicts which patients with kidney disease may develop heartbeat irregularities
* A new model that incorporates a type of artificial intelligence can accurately predict which individuals with chronic kidney disease face a high risk of developing atrial fibrillation. * Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-24)

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