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Current Mathematical model News and Events

Current Mathematical model News and Events, Mathematical model News Articles.
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Synchronised or independent neurons: this is how the brain encodes information
'Like a group of people who whistle a very similar tune': It is the phenomenon of 'co-relation', in which individual neurons do not always act as independent units in receiving and transmitting information but as groups of individuals with similar and simultaneous actions. (2019-09-23)
Big cities breed partners in crime
Researchers have long known that bigger cities disproportionately generate more crime. (2019-09-19)
Where to park your car, according to math
In a world where the best parking space is the one that minimizes time spent in the lot, 2 physicists compare parking strategies and settle on a prudent approach. (2019-09-19)
Study: Bigger cities boost 'social crimes'
The same underlying mechanism that boosts urban innovation and startup businesses can also explain why certain types of crimes, like car theft and robbery, thrive in a larger population. (2019-09-17)
Innovative model created for NASA to predict vitamin levels in spaceflight food
A team of food scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has developed a groundbreaking, user-friendly mathematical model for NASA to help ensure that astronauts' food remains rich in nutrients during extended missions in space. (2019-09-12)
Simple model captures almost 100 years of measles dynamics in London
A simple epidemiological model accurately captures long-term measles transmission dynamics in London, including major perturbations triggered by historical events. (2019-09-12)
Focusing on key sustainable development goals would boost progress across all, analysis finds
The world could make greater progress towards the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals by prioritizing a subset of the goals rather than pursuing them all equally, a first-of-its-kind mathematical study reveals. (2019-09-11)
Brain: How to optimize decision making?
Our brains are constantly faced with different choices. Why is it so difficult to make up our mind when faced with two or more choices? (2019-09-11)
'Planting water' is possible -- against aridity and droughts
Together with scientists from the UK and the US, researchers from the Leibniz- Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have developed a mathematical model that can reflect the complex interplays between vegetation, soil and water regimes. (2019-09-11)
Mathematical model could help correct bias in measuring bacterial communities
A mathematical model shows how bias distorts results when measuring bacterial communities through metagenomic sequencing. (2019-09-10)
People can see beauty in complex mathematics, study shows
Ordinary people see beauty in complex mathematical arguments in the same way they can appreciate a beautiful landscape painting or a piano sonata. (2019-09-05)
New method for imaging biological molecules
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have, together with colleagues from Aalto University in Finland, developed a new method for creating images of molecules in cells or tissue samples. (2019-09-05)
By comparing needles to mosquitoes, new model offers insights into Hepatitis C solutions
Removing used needles does not reduce the spread of Hepatitis C virus -- instead, changing the ratio of infected to uninfected needles is critical, study finds. (2019-09-04)
'Information gerrymandering' poses a threat to democratic decision making, both online and off
Concern over fake news and online trolls is widespread and warranted, but researchers led by the University of Pennsylvania's Joshua Plotkin and the University of Houston's Alexander Stewart have identified another impediment to the free flow of information in social networks. (2019-09-04)
New mathematical model can improve radiation therapy of brain tumours
Researchers have developed a new model to optimize radiation therapy and significantly increase the number of tumor cells killed during treatment. (2019-09-04)
Mathematical model provides new support for environmental taxes
A new mathematical model provides support for environmental taxation, such as carbon taxes, as an effective strategy to promote environmentally friendly practices without slowing economic growth. (2019-09-04)
The 'universal break-up criterion' of hot, flowing lava?
Thomas Jones' 'universal break-up criterion' won't help with meltdowns of the heart, but it will help volcanologists study changing lava conditions in common volcanic eruptions. (2019-08-30)
A new way to measure how water moves
A new method to measure pore structure and water flow can help scientists more accurately and cheaply determine how fast water, contaminants, nutrients and other liquids move through the soil -- and where they go. (2019-08-29)
Diversity of inter-species interactions affects functioning of ecological communities
Mathematical modeling suggests that the diversity of interactions between species in an ecological community plays a greater role in maintaining community functioning than previously thought. (2019-08-29)
Nuclear winter would threaten nearly everyone on Earth
If the United States and Russia waged an all-out nuclear war, much of the land in the Northern Hemisphere would be below freezing in the summertime, with the growing season slashed by nearly 90 percent in some areas, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2019-08-28)
New scientific model can predict moral and political development
A study from a Swedish team of researchers recently published in the social science journal Nature Human Behaviour answers several critical questions on how public opinion changes on moral issues. (2019-08-26)
Software for diagnostics and fail-safe operation of robots developed at FEFU
A team of scientists from School of Engineering at Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Institute of Automation and Control Processes, and Institute of Marine Technology Problems of the Far Eastern Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences developed a software module to automatically diagnose defects in sensors and electric drives in various kinds of robots. (2019-08-22)
Computer model could help test new sickle cell drugs
A new computer model that captures the dynamics of the red blood cell sickling process could help in evaluating drugs for treating sickle cell disease. (2019-08-22)
New technique could streamline design of intricate fusion device
Stellarators, twisty machines that house fusion reactions, rely on complex magnetic coils that are challenging to design and build. (2019-08-21)
Shape-shifting sheets
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a mathematical framework that can turn any sheet of material into any prescribed shape, inspired by the paper craft termed kirigami (from the Japanese, kiri, meaning to cut and kami, meaning paper). (2019-08-20)
Novel combination of drugs may overcome drug-resistant cancer cells
A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital suggests that a combination of three drugs, including a new class of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors, could overcome cross-therapy resistance. (2019-08-20)
Facial recognition technique could improve hail forecasts
The same artificial intelligence technique typically used in facial recognition systems could help improve prediction of hailstorms and their severity, according to a new study from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). (2019-08-19)
Researchers develop tools to help manage seagrass survival
A new QUT-led study has developed a statistical toolbox to help avoid seagrass loss which provides shelter, food and oxygen to fish and at-risk species like dugongs and green turtles. (2019-08-18)
Using Wall Street secrets to reduce the cost of cloud infrastructure
Inspired by Wall Street financial theories used to invest in the stock market, MIT and Microsoft researchers developed a 'risk-aware' model that improves the performance of cloud-computing infrastructure used across the globe. (2019-08-16)
Screening for cervical spine risk factors could reduce CT scans by half
Study finds identifiable risk factors ED staff can use for evaluation, avoiding over 100,000 unnecessary scans annually. (2019-08-15)
Too much inequality impedes support for public goods
Too much inequality in society can result in a damaging lack of support for public goods and services, which could disadvantage the rich as well as the poor, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School, the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and Harvard University. (2019-08-14)
Poo's clues: Moose droppings indicate Isle Royale ecosystem health
Moose are picky eaters, and that's a good thing for their ecosystems. (2019-08-13)
Neuroscientists make major breakthrough in 200-year-old puzzle
Weber's law is the most firmly established rule of psychophysics -- the science that relates the strength of physical stimuli to the sensations of the mind. (2019-08-12)
The formula that makes bacteria float upstream
Bacteria can swim against the current -- and often this is a serious problem, for example when they spread in water pipes or in medical catheters. (2019-08-12)
Study shows we like our math like we like our art: Beautiful
A beautiful landscape painting, a beautiful piano sonata -- art and music are almost exclusively described in terms of aesthetics, but what about math? (2019-08-09)
Mathematicians of TU Dresden develop new statistical indicator
Up to now, it has taken a great deal of computational effort to detect dependencies between more than two high-dimensional variables, in particular when complicated non-linear relationships are involved. (2019-08-09)
Migration can promote or inhibit cooperation between individuals
A new mathematical analysis suggests that migration can generate patterns in the spatial distribution of individuals that promote cooperation and allow populations to thrive, in spite of the threat of exploitation. (2019-08-08)
Dark matter may be older than the big bang, study suggests
Dark matter, which researchers believe make up about 80% of the universe's mass, is one of the most elusive mysteries in modern physics. (2019-08-07)
Quantum momentum
Occasionally we come across a problem in classical mechanics that poses particular difficulties for translation into the quantum world. (2019-08-07)
Entropy explains RNA diffusion rates in cells
Small-scale analysis of RNA diffusion rates throughout cells of yeast and bacteria reveals that rates of change of entropy in certain time intervals are larger in areas with higher diffusion rates, according to research published in EPJ B. (2019-08-07)
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