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Current Mathematical model News and Events

Current Mathematical model News and Events, Mathematical model News Articles.
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Droplet spread from humans doesn't always follow airflow
If aerosol transmission of COVID-19 is confirmed to be significant, we will need to reconsider guidelines on social distancing, ventilation systems and shared spaces. (2020-08-04)
Tool could improve success in translating drugs from animal studies to humans
A new computational tool developed by researchers from Purdue University and MIT could help better determine which drugs should move from animal testing to humans. (2020-08-04)
AI & single-cell genomics
The study of cellular dynamics is crucial to understand how cells develop and how diseases progress. (2020-08-03)
How to improve climate modeling and prediction
Mathematicians propose ideas that make it possible to perform much more effective climate simulations than the traditional approach allows. (2020-07-31)
Stay or leave? A tale of two virus strategies revealed by math
By modeling experimentally measured characteristics of cells infected with hepatitis C in the lab, researchers in Japan found that one virus strain was roughly three times more likely to use copied genetic code to create new viruses compared to another, which instead tended to keep more copies inside an infected cell to accelerate replication. (2020-07-30)
Presenting a SARS-CoV-2 mouse model to study viral responses and vaccine candidates
Researchers who generated a strain of SARS-CoV-2 that can infect mice used it to produce a new mouse model of infection that may help facilitate testing of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics. (2020-07-30)
Breakthrough method for predicting solar storms
Extensive power outages and satellite blackouts that affect air travel and the internet are some of the potential consequences of massive solar storms. (2020-07-29)
COVID-19 risk model uses hospital data to guide decisions on social distancing
With communities throughout the United States combating surges in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Northwestern University have created a framework that helps policymakers determine which data to track and when to take action to protect their communities. (2020-07-29)
How the zebrafish got its stripes
Animal patterns are a source of endless fascination, and now researchers at the University Bath have worked out how zebrafish develop their stripes. (2020-07-27)
Researchers use cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand cancer progression
Using a combination of experiments and mathematical modeling, a team of researchers from the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Science and the Fralin Life Sciences Institute are beginning to unravel the mechanisms that lie behind tetraploidy - a chromosomal abnormality that is often found in malignant tumors. (2020-07-24)
A mouse model was used to determine the personalized treatment for a cancer patient
A team from IDIBELL and ICO, using a mouse orthotopic model, conducted a real-time personalized oncology study to test the best therapeutic option to treat a type of relapse sarcoma. (2020-07-23)
Developing neural circuits linked to hunting behavior
Researchers demonstrated the relationship between improvements in zebrafish's hunting skills and the development of sensory coding in a part of the brain which responds to visual stimuli. (2020-07-23)
Can social unrest, riot dynamics be modeled?
Episodes of social unrest rippled throughout Chile in 2019. Researchers specializing in economics, mathematics and physics in Chile and the U.K. banded together to explore the surprising social dynamics people were experiencing. (2020-07-21)
"Winter is coming": The influence of seasonality on pathogen emergence
Seasonal fluctuations drive the dynamics of many infectious diseases. For instance, the flu spreads more readily in winter. (2020-07-21)
STEM not for women?
A study by Natalia Maloshonok and Irina Shcheglova, research fellows of the HSE University, examines how and why gender stereotypes can disempower female students, leading to poor academic performance and high dropout rates. (2020-07-21)
Scientists discover volcanoes on Venus are still active
A new study identified 37 recently active volcanic structures on Venus. (2020-07-20)
New model connects respiratory droplet physics with spread of Covid-19
Respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot, dry ones, according to a study on droplet physics by an international team of engineers. (2020-07-20)
The Lancet Public Health: Speed of testing is most critical factor in the success of contact tracing strategies to slow COVID-19 transmission
Speed of contact tracing strategies is essential to slowing COVID-19 transmission, according to a mathematical modelling study in The Lancet Public Health journal which models the effectiveness of conventional and app-based strategies on community transmission of the virus. (2020-07-16)
Slow growth the key to long term cold sensing
In this study which appears in Nature, researchers Yusheng Zhao and Rea Antoniou-Kourounioti in the groups of Professor Dame Caroline Dean and Professor Martin Howard at John Innes Centre show that slow growth is used as a signal to sense long-term changes in temperature. (2020-07-15)
Designing better asteroid explorers
Recent NASA missions to asteroids have used robotic explorers to gather data about the early evolution of our Solar System, planet formation, and how life may have originated on Earth. (2020-07-14)
Social media inspired models show winter warming hits fish stocks
Mathematical modelling inspired by social media is identifying the significant impacts of warming seas on the world's fisheries. (2020-07-13)
Antibiotic resistance and the need for personalized treatments
Scientists have discovered that the microbiota of each individual determines the maintenance of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the gut: whereas in some individuals resistant bacteria are quickly eliminated, in others they are not. (2020-07-13)
ITMO University researchers develop new technique for production of plasmonics devices
Researchers from ITMO University have improved on the technique of local processing of composites based on nanoporous glass with addition of silver and copper. (2020-07-13)
How Venus flytraps snap
Venus flytraps catch spiders and insects by snapping their trap leaves. (2020-07-10)
Study of giant ant heads using simple models may aid bio-inspired designs
Researchers have developed a simple model to study how ants balance their large heads relative to their body size. (2020-07-09)
New model of breast cancer's causes developed by UCSF-led team
A new model of the causes of breast cancer, created by a team led by researchers at UC San Francisco, Genentech and Stanford University, is designed to capture the complex interrelationships between dozens of primary and secondary breast cancer causes and stimulate further research. (2020-07-08)
The best (and worst) materials for masks
It's intuitive and scientifically shown that wearing a face covering can help reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. (2020-07-08)
First direct evidence of ocean mixing across the gulf stream
Study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences provides first direct evidence for Gulf Stream blender effect, identifying a new mechanism of mixing water across the swift-moving current. (2020-07-06)
Does DNA in the water tell us how many fish are there?
Researchers have developed a new non-invasive method to count individual fish by measuring the concentration of environmental DNA in the water, which could be applied for quantitative monitoring of aquatic ecosystems. (2020-07-03)
New algorithm for personalized models of human cardiac electrophysiology
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Kazan Federal University, and George Washington University have proposed an algorithm for producing patient-specific mathematical models describing the electrical excitation of human heart cells. (2020-07-02)
Researchers develop computational model to build better capacitors
Researchers have developed a computational model that helps users understand how changes in the nanostructure of materials affect their conductivity - with the goal of informing the development of new energy storage devices for a wide range of electronics. (2020-07-01)
Respiratory droplet motion, evaporation and spread of COVID-19-type pandemics
It is well established the COVID-19 virus is transmitted via respiratory droplets. (2020-06-30)
Mathematical noodling leads to new insights into an old fusion problem
Scientists at PPPL have gained new insight into a common type of plasma hiccup that interferes with fusion reactions. (2020-06-30)
A new theory about political polarization
A new model of opinion formation shows how the extent to which people like or dislike each other affects their political views -- and vice versa. (2020-06-29)
New solar forecasting model performs best
A new mathematical model for predicting variations in solar irradiance has been developed at Uppsala University. (2020-06-28)
Pattern analysis of phylogenetic trees could reveal connections between evolution, ecology
In biology, phylogenetic trees represent the evolutionary history and diversification of species -- the ''family tree'' of Life. (2020-06-26)
New opportunities for ocean and climate modelling
The continuous development and improvement of numerical models for the investigation of the climate system is very expensive and complex. (2020-06-23)
Modeling population differences influences the herd immunity threshold for COVID-19
A new modeling study illustrates how accounting for factors such as age and social activity influences the predicted herd immunity threshold for COVID-19, or the level of population immunity needed to stop the disease's transmission. (2020-06-23)
Herd immunity threshold could be lower according to new study
Herd immunity to Covid-19 could be achieved with less people being infected than previously estimated according to new research. (2020-06-23)
Scientists modelled natural rock arcades
Researchers from Russia and the Czech Republic performed numerical modelling of natural rock arcades using a mathematical model that describes a succession of arches forming as a result of weathering and then turning into rock pillars without human involvement, despite their striking resemblance to architectural arcades. (2020-06-23)
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