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Current Mathematical model News and Events

Current Mathematical model News and Events, Mathematical model News Articles.
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New computational tool could change how we study pathogens
A sophisticated new analysis too incorporating advanced mathematical strategies could help revolutionize the way researchers investigate the spread and distribution of dangerous, fast-evolving disease vectors. (2019-03-22)
New model for ICU care, developed by Rutgers, discovers causes of health emergencies
A new model for intensive care, developed by Rutgers and RWJBarnabas Health System, can help identify preventable -- and previously overlooked -- factors that often send chronically ill patients to the intensive care unit (ICU). (2019-03-20)
Simple blood test could determine preterm birth rate in low-resource countries
A study funded by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation shows blood test and mathematical model can accurately identify preterm babies without ultrasound. (2019-03-19)
Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing
UMD biologist finds alligators build neural maps of sound the way birds do, suggesting the hearing strategy existed in their common ancestor, the dinosaurs. (2019-03-18)
Probability of catastrophic geomagnetic storm lower than estimated
According to a group of mathematics researchers, the probability in the following decade of the sun causing a storm strong enough to affect electrical and communication infrastructures around the globe 'only' reaches 1.9 percent maximum. (2019-03-12)
Computer kidney could provide safer tests for new medications
A University of Waterloo researcher has spearheaded the development of the first computational model of the human kidney. (2019-03-11)
For infection-fighting cells, a guideline for expanding the troops
A new study from Princeton researchers uses mathematical modeling to explain how T cells, part of the body's key defenses against pathogens, expand to fight a new infection. (2019-03-11)
How well do vaccines work? Research reveals measles vaccine efficacy
'What we found was a bit of a shock -- there are a very small number of studies that test whether vaccines are effective across multiple pathogen doses ...' said Langwig. (2019-03-07)
Study: Landlord disclosure of bedbugs cuts infestations, creates long-term savings
Policies requiring landlords to disclose bedbug infestations are an effective way to reduce the prevalence of infestations, according to a just-published study. (2019-03-04)
Light pulses provide a new route to enhance superconductivity
Scientists have shown that pulses of light could be used to turn materials into superconductors through an unconventional type of superconductivity known as 'eta pairing.' (2019-03-03)
When does one of the central ideas in economics work?
Many situations in economics are complicated and competitive; this research raises the question of whether many theories in economics may suffer from the very fundamental problem that the key behavioral assumption of equilibrium is wrong. (2019-02-20)
Epidemiological model lends insight to chlamydia outbreak in Japan
Mathematical models that quantify the dynamics of infectious diseases are crucial predictive tools for the control of ongoing and future outbreaks. (2019-02-19)
Visualizing mental valuation processes
Rafael Polanía and his team of ETH researchers have developed a computer model capable of predicting certain human decisions. (2019-02-19)
MRI and computer modeling reveals how wrist bones move
We use our wrists constantly, but how do they work? (2019-02-13)
A new mouse model may unlock the secrets of type I diabetes
Finding new treatments or a cure for type I diabetes has been elusive in part because scientists have not had a reliable animal model that mimics the full scope of human type I diabetes. (2019-02-12)
Investing in antibiotics critical to saving lives during pandemic influenza outbreaks
In a new study published in the journal Health Economics, researchers at CDDEP, the University of Strathclyde in Scotland, and Wageningen University in the Netherlands developed a mathematical framework to estimate the value of investing in developing and conserving an antibiotic to mitigate the burden of bacterial infections caused by resistant Staphylococcus aureus during a pandemic influenza outbreak. (2019-02-12)
How do protein tangles get so long in Alzheimer's?
Aggregates of the protein tau are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. (2019-02-11)
Machine learning algorithm helps in the search for new drugs
Researchers have designed a machine learning algorithm for drug discovery which has been shown to be twice as efficient as the industry standard, which could accelerate the process of developing new treatments for disease. (2019-02-11)
Planning ahead: A new robust approach for minimizing costs in power-distribution networks
Scientists at Tokyo Tech have developed a new method for scheduling the turning on and off of power generators that minimizes costs and ensures reliability while addressing the issues prevalent in multiple previous methods. (2019-02-08)
Famous 'sandpile model' shown to move like a traveling sand dune
The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years. (2019-02-08)
Overdose deaths could increase with 'changing nature' of opioid epidemic
The opioid epidemic in the United States could be responsible for 700,000 overdose deaths between 2016 and 2025, according to a new study published today in JAMA Network Open. (2019-02-07)
Solving a mystery: A new model for understanding how certain nuclei split
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have extended an existing mathematical model so that it can be used to more accurately predict the products of fission reactions. (2019-02-06)
Electron-gun simulations explain the mechanisms of high-energy cosmic rays
A new study published in EPJ D provides a rudimentary model for simulating cosmic rays' collisions with planets by looking at the model of electrons detached from a negative ion using photons. (2019-02-06)
To conserve energy, AI clears up cloudy forecasts
A new approach developed by Fengqi You, professor in energy systems engineering at Cornell University, predicts the accuracy of the weather forecast using a machine learning model trained with years' worth of data on forecasts and actual weather conditions. (2019-02-06)
Why are you and I and everything else here?
We're here because there's more matter than antimatter in the universe. (2019-02-01)
River levels tracked from space
The 4,300 kilometer Mekong River is a lifeline for South-East Asia. (2019-01-29)
Future changes in human well-being to depend more on social factors than economic factors
The changes in the perception of personal well-being that could take place in the next three decades, on a global level, depend much more on social factors than on economic ones. (2019-01-28)
How ion adsorption affects biological membranes' functions
In a new study published in EPJ E, Izabela Dobrzy?ska from the University of Bia?ystok, Poland, develops a mathematical model describing the electrical properties of biological membranes when ions such as calcium, barium and strontium adsorb onto them at different pH levels. (2019-01-28)
Train the brain to form good habits through repetition
You can hack your brain to form good habits -- like going to the gym and eating healthily -- simply by repeating actions until they stick, according to new psychological research involving the University of Warwick. (2019-01-28)
How do fish & birds hang together? Researchers find the answer is a wake with purp
Fish and birds are able to move in groups, without separating or colliding, due to a newly discovered dynamic: the followers interact with the wake left behind by the leaders. (2019-01-28)
3D human epidermal equivalent created using math
Scientists have successfully constructed a three-dimensional human epidermis based on predictions made by their mathematical model of epidermal homeostasis, providing a new tool for basic research and drug development. (2019-01-24)
What atoms do when liquids and gases meet
From the crest of a wave in the sea to the surface of a glass of water, there are always small fluctuations in density at the point where the air comes in contact with a liquid. (2019-01-24)
An icy forecast for ringed seal populations
Scientists have already observed and predicted that high ringed seal pup mortality rates are linked to poor environmental conditions like early ice breakup and low snow. (2019-01-23)
Multi-hop communication: Frog choruses inspire wireless sensor networks
A team including researchers from Osaka University looked to nature for inspiration in designing more effective wireless sensor networks. (2019-01-22)
Inability to integrate reward info contributes to undervalued rewards in schizophrenia
People with schizophrenia have a hard time integrating information about a reward -- the size of the reward and the probability of receiving it -- when assessing its value, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. (2019-01-22)
Social media privacy is in the hands of a few friends
New research has revealed that people's behavior is predictable from the social media data of as few as eight or nine of their friends. (2019-01-21)
Measuring AI's ability to learn is difficult
Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2019-01-17)
From emergence to eruption: Comprehensive model captures life of a solar flare
A team of scientists has, for the first time, used a single, cohesive computer model to simulate the entire life cycle of a solar flare: from the buildup of energy thousands of kilometers below the solar surface, to the emergence of tangled magnetic field lines, to the explosive release of energy in a brilliant flash. (2019-01-16)
Mathematical model can improve our knowledge on cancer
Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have developed a new mathematical tool, which can improve our understanding of what happens when cells lose their polarity (direction) in diseases such as cancer. (2019-01-15)
UK must stay vigilant for bluetongue after 2007 'lucky escape'
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have used mathematical modelling to identify why the 2007 UK outbreak of bluetongue -- a viral disease spread by midge bites that affects sheep and cattle -- was smaller than it could have been and to predict the future impact of the disease in northern Europe as the climate warms. (2019-01-14)
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