Nav: Home

Current Mathematics News and Events

Current Mathematics News and Events, Mathematics News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
UT mathematician develops model to control spread of aquatic invasive species
Adjusting the water flow rate in a river can prevent invasive species from moving upstream and expanding their range. (2019-11-21)
Foam offers way to manipulate light
A study by Princeton scientists has shown that a type of foam long studied by scientists is able to block particular wavelengths of light, a coveted property for next-generation information technology that uses light instead of electricity. (2019-11-18)
A better understanding of soft artificial muscles
Artificial muscles will power the soft robots and wearable devices of the future. (2019-11-15)
What future do emperor penguins face?
Emperor penguins establish their colonies on sea ice under extremely specific conditions. (2019-11-12)
Study finds brains of girls and boys are similar, producing equal math ability
Jessica Cantlon at Carnegie Mellon University led a research team that comprehensively examined the brain development of young boys and girls. (2019-11-08)
Tiny swimming donuts deliver the goods
Bacteria and other swimming microorganisms evolved to thrive in challenging environments, and researchers struggle to mimic their unique abilities for biomedical technologies, but fabrication challenges created a manufacturing bottleneck. (2019-10-30)
RUDN scientists proved a theorem that would help calculate water movement in porous rock
Mathematicians from RUDN University have proved the unique continuation theorem for a one dimensional solution to a fractional order diffusion problem. (2019-10-23)
Mathematical modelling vital to tackling disease outbreaks
Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. (2019-10-17)
Parental gender attitudes associated with Japanese girls' reduced university participation
Researchers in Japan have found stereotypical gender role attitudes and negative images of STEM fields of Japanese parents may be associated with girls' reduced university participation. (2019-10-16)
Explained: The lifetime of an evaporating liquid drop
The lifespan of a liquid droplet which is transforming into vapour can now be predicted thanks to a theory developed at the University of Warwick. (2019-10-10)
Computer kidney sheds light on proper hydration
A new computer kidney developed at the University of Waterloo could tell researchers more about the impacts of medicines taken by people who don't drink enough water. (2019-10-07)
RUDN University mathematicians help improve efficiency of data centers using Markov chains
RUDN University mathematicians created a model of maximum efficiency of data centers. (2019-09-30)
Staying at elementary school for longer associated with higher student attainment
A new study has discovered that US students achieve better results in reading and mathematics tests when they stay in elementary school for grades 6 (age 11-12) and 7 (age 12-13), rather than transfer to middle school. (2019-09-20)
Where to park your car, according to math
In a world where the best parking space is the one that minimizes time spent in the lot, 2 physicists compare parking strategies and settle on a prudent approach. (2019-09-19)
The ever-winning lottery ticket: Mathematicians solve a dusty mystery
After years of work, University of Copenhagen mathematics researchers have answered a mysterious half-century-old riddle. (2019-09-09)
People can see beauty in complex mathematics, study shows
Ordinary people see beauty in complex mathematical arguments in the same way they can appreciate a beautiful landscape painting or a piano sonata. (2019-09-05)
New mathematical model can improve radiation therapy of brain tumours
Researchers have developed a new model to optimize radiation therapy and significantly increase the number of tumor cells killed during treatment. (2019-09-04)
Researchers develop a better way to harness the power of solar panels
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a way to better harness the volume of energy collected by solar panels. (2019-08-27)
Computer model could help test new sickle cell drugs
A new computer model that captures the dynamics of the red blood cell sickling process could help in evaluating drugs for treating sickle cell disease. (2019-08-22)
Speed identified as the best predictor of car crashes
Speeding is the riskiest kind of aggressive driving, according to a unique analysis of data from on-board devices in vehicles. (2019-08-21)
Shape-shifting sheets
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a mathematical framework that can turn any sheet of material into any prescribed shape, inspired by the paper craft termed kirigami (from the Japanese, kiri, meaning to cut and kami, meaning paper). (2019-08-20)
Study shows we like our math like we like our art: Beautiful
A beautiful landscape painting, a beautiful piano sonata -- art and music are almost exclusively described in terms of aesthetics, but what about math? (2019-08-09)
A key piece to understanding how quantum gravity affects low-energy physics
In a new study, led by researchers from SISSA (Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati), the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Waterloo, a solid theoretical framework is provided to discuss modifications to the Unruh effect caused by the microstructure of space-time. (2019-08-08)
Novel school improvement program can raise teaching quality while reducing inequality
A multi-national European study, looking at over 5,500 students, has found that a novel school intervention program can not only improve the mathematics scores of primary school children from disadvantaged areas, but can also lessen the achievement gap caused by socioeconomic status. (2019-08-06)
Earthquakes, hurricanes and other natural disasters obey same mathematical pattern
Researchers from the Centre for Mathematical Research (CRM) and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona have mathematically described the frequency of several dangerous phenomena according to their size with more precision than ever. (2019-08-05)
What gives meteorites their shape? New research uncovers a 'Goldilocks' answer
Meteoroids coming from outer space are randomly shaped, but many of these, which land on Earth as meteorites, are found to be carved into cones. (2019-07-22)
New technique developed to detect autism in children
Researchers have developed a new technique to help doctors more quickly and accurately detect autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children. (2019-07-09)
'Curvy bacteria' weigh the benefits of different shapes
Research by scientists into why some bacteria have different shapes has found that a curved shape can make it easier to find food. (2019-07-08)
Good home learning in early years boosts your secondary school achievements
The positive effects of a rich home learning environment during a child's early years continue into adolescence and help improve test scores later in life, according to a new study published in School Effectiveness and School Improvement. (2019-07-07)
A new normal: Study explains universal pattern in fossil record
Instead of the typical bell-shaped curve, the fossil record shows a fat-tailed distribution, with extreme, outlier, events occurring with higher-than-expected probability. (2019-06-26)
Music students do better in school than non-musical peers
High school students who take music courses score significantly better on math, science and English exams than their non-musical peers, according to a new study published in the Journal of Educational Psychology. (2019-06-24)
HIB vaccine linked with better health, cognition, and schooling outcomes in Indian children
Researchers at CDDEP, the University of California, Riverside and Harvard T.H. (2019-06-12)
New technique will help experts make heads or tails of male fertility
A new way of analyzing sperm that tracks the movement of the sperm tail could enable substantial improvements to male fertility testing. (2019-06-06)
Mathematicians revive abandoned approach to Riemann Hypothesis
Many ways to approach the Riemann Hypothesis have been proposed during the past 150 years, but none of them have led to conquering the most famous open problem in mathematics. (2019-05-21)
Study illuminates the brain's inner workings
'We're using computational modeling to investigate the inner workings of the brain,' says Sarah Muldoon, Ph.D., University at Buffalo assistant professor of mathematics. (2019-04-03)
Report examines origins and nature of 'math anxiety'
A report out today examines the factors that influence 'math anxiety' among primary and secondary school students, showing that teachers and parents may inadvertently play a role in a child's development of the condition, and that girls tend to be more affected than boys. (2019-03-13)
Probability of catastrophic geomagnetic storm lower than estimated
According to a group of mathematics researchers, the probability in the following decade of the sun causing a storm strong enough to affect electrical and communication infrastructures around the globe 'only' reaches 1.9 percent maximum. (2019-03-12)
Symmetry, a resource that children spontaneously use to draw the plant world
Children love to draw and when they draw they portray the reality they see and know. (2019-02-06)
Variations in seafloor create freak ocean waves
Florida State University researchers have found that abrupt variations in the seafloor can cause dangerous ocean waves known as rogue or freak waves -- waves so catastrophic that they were once thought to be the figments of seafarers' imaginations. (2019-02-01)
What atoms do when liquids and gases meet
From the crest of a wave in the sea to the surface of a glass of water, there are always small fluctuations in density at the point where the air comes in contact with a liquid. (2019-01-24)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.