Current Mathematics News and Events

Current Mathematics News and Events, Mathematics News Articles.
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A student's experience with math is affected by the composition of the group they are in
Weak students in high-performing math classes, especially boys, feel more shame compared to students in low-performing math classes. Stronger students, in turn, feel more bored and enjoy mathematics less in high-performing math classes, according to a new study. (2020-11-17)

Making the best decision: Math shows diverse thinkers equal better results
A Florida State University researcher found that networks that consisted of both impulsive and deliberate individuals made, on average, quicker and better decisions than a group with homogenous thinkers. (2020-11-16)

Biophysicists modelled the effect of antiseptics on bacterial membranes
A team of biophysics from leading Russian research and educational institutions (MSU, RUDN University, and the Federal Research and Clinical Center of the Federal Medical-Biological Agency of Russia) developed a computer model that shows the effect of antiseptics on bacterial membranes. The common concepts regarding the mode of action of antiseptics turned out to be incorrect: instead of destroying bacterial membranes, they cause changes in their structure. These changes make the bacteria weaker and more susceptible to adverse external factors. (2020-10-28)

Showcasing successful women's STEM achievements, a social vaccine against gender stereotypes
In a study published in the open access journal Frontiers in Psychology, a team of researchers led by the director of the GenTIC (Gender and ICT) research group at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3), Milagros Sáinz, have demonstrated the impact of female role models in influencing girls' preferences for studying STEM subjects. (2020-10-19)

'Universal law of touch' will enable new advances in virtual reality
Seismic waves, commonly associated with earthquakes, have been used by scientists to develop a universal scaling law for the sense of touch. A team, led by researchers at the University of Birmingham, used Rayleigh waves to create the first scaling law for touch sensitivity. The results are published in Science Advances. (2020-10-09)

Applying artificial intelligence to science education
A new review published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching highlights the potential of machine learning--a subset of artificial intelligence--in science education. (2020-10-07)

When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths
Using data from all 50 US states plus the District of Columbia, two mathematicians have developed a new method to analyse COVD-19 rates to help policymakers identify demonstrable turning points in infection surges. (2020-09-22)

How do stone forests get their spikes? New research offers pointed answer
A team of scientists has now shed new light on how stone forests and other natural structures are created. Its research also offers promise for the manufacturing of sharp-tipped structures, such as the micro-needles and probes needed for scientific research and medical procedures. (2020-09-07)

A new model to predict survival in colorectal cancer
This signature could be useful in clinical practice, especially for colorectal cancer diagnosis and therapy. Future studies should determine the effectiveness of integration in cancer survival analysis and the application on unbalanced data, where the classes are of different sizes, as well as on data with multiple classes. (2020-09-03)

USU mathematicians unravel a thread of string theory
Thomas Hill and Andreas Malmendier of Utah State University, and Adrian Clingher of the University of Missouri-St. Louis, explore a string duality between F-theory and heterotic string theory in eight dimensions in paper published in 'Letters in Mathematical Physics.' (2020-08-17)

Research captures how human sperm swim in 3D
Using state-of-the-art 3D microscopy and mathematics, Dr Hermes Gadêlha from the University of Bristol, Dr Gabriel Corkidi and Dr Alberto Darszon from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, have reconstructed the movement of the sperm tail in 3D with high-precision. (2020-08-13)

Mathematical patterns developed by Alan Turing help researchers understand bird behavior
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have used mathematical modelling to understand why flocks of long-tailed tits segregate themselves into different parts of the landscape. (2020-08-11)

Successful school instruction is digital - but not exclusively
Secondary school students perform better in natural sciences and mathematics and are more motivated when digital tools are used in instruction. However, success depends on the design of the tools used. Success levels are higher when children and young adults do not study alone and when digital instruction is accompanied by paper-based teaching materials, according to the conclusion reached by one of the largest investigations on the topic, evaluating approximately 90 individual studies. (2020-08-10)

How human sperm really swim: New research challenges centuries-old assumption
A breakthrough in fertility science by researchers from Bristol and Mexico has shattered the universally accepted view of how sperm 'swim'. (2020-07-31)

STEM not for women?
A study by Natalia Maloshonok and Irina Shcheglova, research fellows of the HSE University, examines how and why gender stereotypes can disempower female students, leading to poor academic performance and high dropout rates. According to the study, more than one in three (35%) young women have been led to believe in men's superior mathematical ability. (2020-07-21)

Hidden in our genes: Discovering the fate of cell development
Scientists at the University of Sydney have developed a powerful new tool to analyse the fate of cell development by examining individual cells and genetic development within them. Dubbed scHOT for single-cell higher-order testing, the scientists expect the new analytical tool will help develop therapeutic treatments for a wide range of diseases. (2020-07-13)

Surprisingly many peculiar long introns found in brain genes
In a recent study of genes involved in brain functioning, their previously unknown features have been uncovered by bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, RAS. (2020-07-09)

Mathematical noodling leads to new insights into an old fusion problem
Scientists at PPPL have gained new insight into a common type of plasma hiccup that interferes with fusion reactions. These findings could help bring fusion energy closer to reality. (2020-06-30)

An ethical eye on AI
Researchers from the University of Warwick, Imperial College London, EPFL (Lausanne) and Sciteb Ltd have found a mathematical means of helping regulators and business manage and police Artificial Intelligence systems' biases towards making unethical, and potentially very costly and damaging commercial choices - an ethical eye on AI. (2020-06-29)

Addressing the persistent gender gaps in some STEM pursuits
In a Policy Forum, Joseph Cimpian and colleagues identify blind spots in current educational policy designed to remedy gender inequity in STEM and argue that interventions may need to become more nuanced concerning student achievement. (2020-06-18)

Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent
A study, by mathematicians at the University of York, has used new techniques to address the long-running debate over whether battle deaths have been declining globally since the end of the Second World War. (2020-06-16)

Classes set by ability are hitting children's self-confidence, study finds
The way a vast amount of schools are setup, with classes grouping children based on their ability, is severely affecting pupil's self-confidence. (2020-06-16)

Environmental noise changes evolutionary cooperation between cellular components, model shows
Cells are massive factories, containing a multitude of substations devoted to specific tasks all devoted to keeping the overarching organism alive. Until now, researchers have questioned how such diverse components evolve in tandem -- especially when each component can evolve in a variety of ways. Two researchers based in Tokyo, Japan, have developed a statistical physics model to demonstrate how such evolution is possible. The results were published on May 26 in Physical Review Letters. (2020-06-06)

Carnegie Mellon tool automatically turns math into pictures
Some people look at an equation and see a bunch of numbers and symbols; others see beauty. Thanks to a new tool created at Carnegie Mellon University, anyone can now translate the abstractions of mathematics into beautiful and instructive illustrations. The tool enables users to create diagrams simply by typing an ordinary mathematical expression and letting the software do the drawing. (2020-06-02)

NUI Galway mathematician publishes article in world's top mathematics journal
An Irish mathematician, Dr Martin Kerin, from the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics at NUI Galway, has had a research article published in the Annals of Mathematics, widely regarded as the top journal for pure mathematics in the world. The article resolves a question ?rst asked around 60 years ago on the geometrical properties of seven-dimensional objects which very closely resemble spheres. (2020-05-28)

Study shows domestic violence reports on the rise as COVID-19 keeps people at home
A UCLA-led research team has found an increase in domestic violence reports in Los Angeles and Indianapolis since the stay-at-home restrictions were implemented in March. The scholars, who are leaders in applying mathematics to interpret and make sense of police crime data, predict the incidence should gradually decrease as people return to normal routines, but would likely increase again if there is a second wave of COVID-19 infections that prompts new stay-at-home orders. (2020-05-27)

New information about the transmission of the amphibian pathogen, Bsal
Using existing data from controlled experiments and computer simulations, researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture have found that host contact rates and habitat structure affect transmission rates of Bsal among eastern newts, a common salamander species found throughout eastern North America. (2020-04-08)

IKBFU Physicists keep improving 'smart' composites for biomedical sensors
The new composites are related to the multiferroic-class materials which have mutually controlled magnetic and electric properties. The effects observed in the compositions are considered to be a perspective platform for creating new devices from energy converters to highly sensitive sensors. (2020-03-10)

Speak math, not code
Writing algorithms in mathematics rather than code is not only more elegant but also more efficient, says 2013 Turing Award winner Leslie Lamport. (2020-03-01)

French mathematician and spider aficionado Cédric Villani honoured with a new orb-weaver
Considered as one of the best studied spiders, the orb-weavers remain poorly known in the central parts of the Palearctic ecozone. Hence, an international research team took to the Caucasus, Middle East and Central Asia. Their article in the open-access peer-reviewed journal ZooKeys documents three new to science species, where one is named after the Indo-Iranian god of light Mithra. Another carries the name of the flamboyant French mathematician and spider aficionado Cédric Villani. (2020-02-03)

Math that feels good
Mathematics and science Braille textbooks are expensive and require an enormous effort to produce -- until now. A team of researchers has developed a method for easily creating textbooks in Braille, with an initial focus on math textbooks. The new process is made possible by a new authoring system which serves as a 'universal translator' for textbook formats. Based on this new method, the production of Braille textbooks will become easy, inexpensive, and widespread. (2020-01-16)

Mathematicians put famous Battle of Britain 'what if' scenarios to the test
Mathematicians from the University of York have developed a new model to explore what the impact of changes to Luftwaffe tactics would actually have been. Their approach uses statistical modelling to calculate how the Battle might have played out if history had followed one of several alternative courses. (2020-01-09)

Indeterminist physics for an open world
Classical physics is characterized by the equations describing the world. Yet our day-to-day experience is struck by this deterministic vision of the world. A physicist (UNIGE) has been analyzing the classical mathematical language used in modern physics. He has thrown light on a contradiction between the equations that explained the phenomena and the finite world. He suggests making changes to the mathematical language to allow randomness and indeterminism to become part of classical physics. (2020-01-07)

Understanding the mechanisms of seemingly chaotic synchronization in trees
The synchronization of seed production by trees has garnered attention due to its importance in agriculture, forestry and ecosystem management. A team of scientists led by Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have developed a method that can be used to model the wide range of synchronization behaviors exhibited by different tree species simply by changing the control parameters. (2019-12-19)

Smaller class sizes not always better for pupils, multinational study shows
A new statistical analysis of data from a long-term study on the teaching of mathematics and science has found that smaller class sizes are not always associated with better pupil performance and achievement. (2019-12-15)

Researchers develop first mathematical proof for key law of turbulence in fluid mechanics
Turbulence is one of the least understood phenomena of the physical world. Long considered too hard to understand and predict mathematically, turbulence is the reason the Navier-Stokes equations, which describe how fluids flow, are so hard to solve that there is a million-dollar reward for anyone who can prove them mathematically. But now, University of Maryland mathematicians have broken through the barrier and developed the first rigorous mathematical proof for a fundamental law of turbulence. (2019-12-11)

Analyzing seismic patterns to forecast the magnitude of the largest earthquake aftershocks
Earthquakes can have devastating impacts on communities all around the world. Associate Professor Jiancang Zhuang and Emeritus Professor Yosihiko Ogata from The Institute of Statistical Mathematics (ISM) in Japan, in collaboration with colleagues, have developed a method that can forecast the probability of when and where aftershocks are likely to occur, and how strong the largest of these will be. Their findings were published on Sept. 6, 2019, in Nature Communications. (2019-12-01)

UT mathematician develops model to control spread of aquatic invasive species
Adjusting the water flow rate in a river can prevent invasive species from moving upstream and expanding their range. An applied mathematician at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has developed a partial differential equation model to find the desired flow rate to reduce invasive populations. (2019-11-21)

Foam offers way to manipulate light
A study by Princeton scientists has shown that a type of foam long studied by scientists is able to block particular wavelengths of light, a coveted property for next-generation information technology that uses light instead of electricity. (2019-11-18)

A better understanding of soft artificial muscles
Artificial muscles will power the soft robots and wearable devices of the future. But more needs to be understood about the underlying mechanics of these powerful structures in order to design and build new devices. Now, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have uncovered some of the fundamental physical properties of artificial muscle fibers. (2019-11-15)

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