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Current Maya News and Events

Current Maya News and Events, Maya News Articles.
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Exercising while restricting calories could be bad for bone health
UNC School of Medicine's Maya Styner, MD, led research showing that the combination of cutting calories and exercising can make bones smaller and more fragile in animals, whereas exercise on a full-calorie diet has a positive impact on bone health. (2019-09-11)
Maya more warlike than previously thought
What was the role of warfare in Mayan civilization? New evidence from lake sediments around the abandoned city of Witzna indicates that extreme, total warfare was not just an aspect of the late Mayan period, leading to its fall, but a characteristic of intercity rivalry during the peak of Mayan culture. (2019-08-05)
Maize-centric diet may have contributed to ancient Maya collapse
Researchers look at the role of diet in the ability of the ancient Maya to withstand periods of severe climatic stress. (2019-07-02)
Nicotine and caffeine withdrawal may lead to unnecessary suffering and testing in intensive care patients
Nicotine and caffeine withdrawal can cause unnecessary suffering to patients in intensive care units (ICUs), and could be leading to unneeded laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging such as X-rays and MRIs, according to a systematic review of clinical and observational studies involving 483 adults. (2019-05-31)
High-quality jadeite tool discovered in underwater ancient salt works in Belize
Anthropologists discovered a tool made out of high-quality translucent jadeite with an intact rosewood handle at a site where the ancient Maya processed salt in Belize. (2019-05-20)
Why do birds typically live longer than mammals?
Why do birds typically live longer than mammals? A new paper offers a hint, albeit not a conclusive answer. (2019-05-01)
Few at-risk adults getting the diabetes prevention help they need
Using data from the 2016 National Health Interview Survey, Johns Hopkins researchers report that few American adults eligible for diabetes prevention programs are being referred to, or participating in, these programs. (2019-04-24)
At last, acknowledging royal women's political power
Across the globe in a variety of societies, royal women found ways to advance the issues they cared about and advocate for the people important to them as detailed in a recent paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Research. (2019-04-16)
UC researchers find ancient Maya farms in Mexican wetlands
Archaeologists with the University of Cincinnati used the latest technology to find evidence suggesting ancient Maya people grew surplus crops to support an active trade with neighbors up and down the Yucatan Peninsula. (2019-03-29)
C-sections are seen as breastfeeding barrier in US, but not in other global communities
Amanda Veile, an assistant professor of anthropology at Purdue University, and her team report that indigenous mothers in farming communities in Yucatán, Mexico, breastfeed for about 1.5 months longer following cesarean deliveries than they do following vaginal deliveries. (2019-03-21)
Ancient extinct sloth tooth in Belize tells story of creature's last year
Some 27,000 years ago in central Belize, a giant sloth was thirsty. (2019-02-27)
Billions of nanoplastics accumulate in marine organisms within six hours
A ground-breaking study has shown it takes a matter of hours for billions of minute plastic nanoparticles to become embedded throughout the major organs of a marine organism. (2018-12-03)
How ancient Mayan shell decor led to a new look at freshwater mussels south of the border
An unlikely collaboration between archaeologists desperate to put names to shells at Mayan dig sites and an ichthyologist led to the first molecular study of Mexican and Central American freshwater mussels. (2018-11-26)
The Indians of the Ecuadorian Amazon were using cocoa 5300 years ago
An international team* associating archaeologists, anthropologists, biochemists and geneticists recently found for the first time archaeological traces of cocoa use in South America in pre-Columbian times. (2018-10-30)
Salt: Mover and shaker in ancient Maya society
Salt is essential for life. As ancient civilizations evolved from hunters and gatherers to agrarian societies, it has not been clear how people acquired this mineral that is a biological necessity. (2018-10-08)
Lidar survey 'compels' revaluation of aspects of ancient Maya society
An airborne laser mapping survey of over 2,000 square kilometers of northern Guatemala - the largest such survey to date of this region -- 'compels' a revaluation of Maya demography, agriculture, and political economy, according to its authors. (2018-09-27)
'Gut sense' is hardwired, not hormonal
Searching for a more direct connection between the gut and the brain, Duke researchers were shocked to see that distance spanned by a single synapse, relaying the signal in less than 100 milliseconds, less than the blink of an eye. (2018-09-20)
Wild animals were routinely captured and traded in ancient Mesoamerica
New evidence from the Maya city of Copan, in Honduras, reveals that ancient Mesoamericans routinely captured and traded wild animals for symbolic and ritual purposes, according to a study published Sept. (2018-09-12)
Carbon reserves in Central American soils still affected by ancient Mayan deforestation
Deforestation is suspected to have contributed to the mysterious collapse of Mayan civilization more than 1,000 years ago. (2018-08-20)
The drought that collapsed classic Maya society
A period of severe drought near the end of the 1st millennium C.E. likely sealed the fate of Lowland Classic Maya society, and a new study shows just how dry it was as the populations of the Maya Lowlands began to evaporate. (2018-08-02)
Scientists measure severity of drought during the Maya collapse
The severity of drought conditions during the demise of the Maya civilization about 1,000 years ago has been quantified, representing another piece of evidence that could be used to solve the longstanding mystery of what caused the downfall of one of the ancient world's great civilizations. (2018-08-02)
Politicization and prioritization in the judiciary
In ''The Politics of Selecting the Bench from the Bar: The Legal Profession and Partisan Incentives to Introduce Ideology into Judicial Selection,'' published in the Journal of Law and Economics, Adam Bonica and Maya Sen analyze how and why American courts become politicized. (2018-08-01)
Biotin supplements caused misleading test results, almost led to unnecessary procedure
A new case report led by Maya Styner, M.D., of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine describes how a patient's use of a common over-the-counter biotin supplement caused clinically misleading test results and almost resulted in an unnecessary, invasive medical procedure. (2018-05-18)
Students' social relationships in the last year of secondary education
Establishing friendships in the university context helps students to gain independence and to manage their lives in their new environment with more self-confidence. (2018-04-25)
Laser technology takes Maya archeologists where they've never gone before
With the help of airborne laser mapping technology, a team of archeologists, led by UA professor Takeshi Inomata, is exploring on a larger scale than ever before the history and spread of settlement at the ancient Maya site of Ceibal in Guatemala. (2018-02-21)
Eye and heart complications are tightly linked in type 1 diabetes
People with chronic kidney disease have much higher risk of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death for those with type 1 diabetes. (2018-01-31)
Thyroid hormone therapy heals lung fibrosis in animal study
Thyroid hormone therapy significantly resolves fibrosis, or scarring, in the lungs of mice, increasing their survival from disease, a Yale-led study shows. (2017-12-04)
RNG105/caprin1 is essential for long-term memory formation
The research group of Associate Professor Nobuyuki Shiina of the National Institute for Basic Biology have revealed that the function of RNG105 (aka Caprin1) is essential for the formation of long-term memory. (2017-11-21)
Engineering tomorrow's responsive, adaptable neuroprosthetics and robots
Advanced prosthetic limbs and eyes as well as brain-machine interfaces are harnessing existing neural circuitry to improve the quality of life for people with sensory impairment, according to studies presented today at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2017-11-14)
Survey finds pediatric doctors attempts to address parental health issues are limited by barriers
A national survey of more than 200 pediatric primary care physicians found that while over three-quarters addressed at least one parental health issue, such as maternal depression or parental tobacco use, during child health visits and a majority recognized the impact of such issues on children's health, fewer felt responsible for addressing them. (2017-11-09)
Examining the management of diabetes in special populations
A special issue of Current Diabetes Review examining the management of diabetes in special populations: awareness of the needs of ethnic minorities, elderly patients, bariatric surgery patients, those with mental illness, and those being discharged from the hospital. (2017-09-29)
Genetic risk profile predicts survival for people with severe lung disease
An international Yale-led research team has shown that a risk profile based on 52 genes accurately predicts survival for patients with a severe lung disease. (2017-09-20)
How Teotihuacan's urban design was lost and found
The paper outlines how the urban design of the city of Teotihuacan differed from past and subsequent cities, only to be rediscovered and partially modelled on many centuries later by the Aztecs. (2017-09-20)
When residents take charge of their rainforests, fewer trees die
When the government gives citizens a personal stake in forested land, trees don't disappear as quickly and environmental harm slows down. (2017-09-20)
Noninvasive retinal imaging may improve early detection of Alzheimer's disease
In this issue of JCI Insight, researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center adapted a noninvasive retinal imaging approach to characterize amyloid-β deposition, the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, in the retinas of patients and healthy controls. (2017-08-17)
Noninvasive eye scan could detect key signs of Alzheimer's years before patients show symptoms
Cedars-Sinai neuroscience investigators have found that Alzheimer's disease affects the retina -- the back of the eye -- similarly to the way it affects the brain. (2017-08-17)
Secret to happiness may include more unpleasant emotions
People may be happier when they feel the emotions they desire, even if those emotions are unpleasant, such as anger or hatred, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2017-08-14)
Body ownership is not impaired in schizophrenia
Answering a long-standing question, EPFL scientists have determined that the sense of body ownership is not affected in schizophrenia patients. (2017-07-26)
Discovering, counting, cataloguing proteins
Scientists describe a well-defined mitochondrial proteome in baker's yeast. (2017-06-28)
Review: No definitive standard for identifying and treating veterans at risk for suicide
A systematic review of basic and clinical science research has revealed no definitive standard for detecting military veterans at risk of suicidal behavior, nor is there a clear standard of treatment to prevent suicide among US veterans. (2017-06-15)
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