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Current Mayo clinic News and Events

Current Mayo clinic News and Events, Mayo clinic News Articles.
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Mayo Clinic study: 20% of patients are prescribed opioids after cardiac device implantation surgery
One in five patients is prescribed opioids after having a pacemaker or similar device implanted, according to a large US study conducted at Mayo Clinic published in HeartRhythm. (2019-10-21)
Mayo Clinic researchers find dairy products associated with higher risk of prostate cancer
The researchers reviewed 47 studies published since 2006, comprising more than 1,000,000 total participants, to better understand the risks of prostate cancer associated with plant- and animal-based foods. (2019-10-21)
Repurposing heart drugs to target cancer cells
This study has highlighted a novel senolytic drug - drug that eliminates senescent cells -- that are currently being used to treat heart conditions that could be repurposed to target cancer cells, and a range of other conditions. (2019-10-21)
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia offers help and cure for picky eaters
Families dealing with the stress and frustration of their child's overly picky eating habits may have a new addition to their parental toolbox. (2019-10-21)
Study finds racial disparities in treatment of multiple myeloma patients
Among patients with multiple myeloma, African-Americans and Hispanics start treatment with a novel therapy significantly later than white patients, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances. (2019-10-17)
Online abortion medication demand highest in states with restrictive abortion policies
Demand for abortion medication through online telemedicine in the United States varies by state policy context, according to new peer-reviewed research from the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin published in the American Journal of Public Health. (2019-10-17)
NIH scientists develop test for uncommon brain diseases
National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have developed an ultrasensitive new test to detect abnormal forms of the protein tau associated with uncommon types of neurodegenerative diseases called tauopathies. (2019-10-16)
Cleveland Clinic-led research team develops new genetic-based epilepsy risk scores
An international team of researchers led by Cleveland Clinic has developed new genetic-based epilepsy risk scores which may lay the foundation for a more personalized method of epilepsy diagnosis and treatment. (2019-10-14)
Taking RTKI drugs during radiotherapy may not aid survival, worsens side effects
Taking certain cancer-fighting drugs while undergoing radiation therapy may not increase survival for patients, but may, instead, increase side effects, according to a team of researchers. (2019-10-10)
Social determinant screening useful for families with pediatric sickle cell disease
Individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) face the burdens of chronic illness and often racial disparities, both of which may increase vulnerability to adverse social determinants of health (SDoH). (2019-10-09)
Details of dental wear revealed
The teeth of mammals experience constant wear. However, the details of these wear processes are largely unknown. (2019-10-08)
Study provides insights on treatment and prognosis of male breast cancer
A recent analysis reveals that treatment of male breast cancer has evolved over the years. (2019-10-07)
New test assists physicians with quicker treatment decisions for sepsis
A new test to determine whether antibiotics will be effective against certain bacterial infections is helping physicians make faster and better prescription treatment choices. (2019-10-03)
Vaping-associated lung injury may be caused by toxic chemical fumes, study finds
Research into the pathology of vaping-associated lung injury is in its early stages, but a Mayo Clinic study published in The New England Journal of Medicine finds that lung injuries from vaping most likely are caused by direct toxicity or tissue damage from noxious chemical fumes. (2019-10-02)
New blood test capable of detecting multiple types of cancer
A new blood test in development has shown ability to screen for numerous types of cancer with a high degree of accuracy, a trial of the test led by Dana-Farber shows. (2019-09-28)
Predicting cancer versus autism risk in PTEN patients
In a new study published in American Journal of Human Genetics, a team of researchers led by Charis Eng, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of Cleveland Clinic's Genomic Medicine Institute, identified a metabolite that may predict whether individuals with PTEN mutations will develop cancer or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). (2019-09-26)
Simple lifestyle modifications key to preventing large percentage of breast cancer cases
Expert reports estimate that one in three breast cancer cases could be prevented by lifestyle modifications. (2019-09-24)
'Push-pull' dynamic in brain network is key to stopping seizures
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have discovered that the spreading of seizures through the brain can be suppressed depending on the amount of pressure within the brain, an important discovery that may revolutionize the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy. (2019-09-23)
SCAI stages of cardiogenic shock stratify mortality risk
A new shock classification scheme released by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) and endorsed by the American College of Cardiology (ACC), American Heart Association, the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons was recently applied in a retrospective study analyzing patients in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) at the Mayo Clinic. (2019-09-20)
Medications underused in treating opioid addiction, Mayo Clinic expert says
Though research shows that medication-assisted treatment can help people who are addicted to opioids, the three drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are underused, according to a review of current medical data on opioid addiction in the U.S. (2019-09-19)
Mayo researchers demonstrate senescent cell burden is reduced in humans by senolytic drugs
In a small safety and feasibility clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated for the first time that senescent cells can be removed from the body using drugs termed 'senolytics.' The result was verified not only in analysis of blood but also in changes in skin and fat tissue senescent cell abundance. (2019-09-18)
3D virtual reality models help yield better surgical outcomes
A UCLA-led study has found that using three-dimensional virtual reality models to prepare for kidney tumor surgeries resulted in substantial improvements, including shorter operating times, less blood loss during surgery and a shorter stay in the hospital afterward. (2019-09-18)
Study finds new way to make chemotherapy more effective against pancreatic cancer
Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal malignancy that most often is resistant to chemotherapy. (2019-09-18)
At-home blood pressure tests more accurate for African Americans
At-home measurements are more accurate, less expensive, and easier to obtain than blood pressure screenings done in medical settings. (2019-09-16)
Diet impacts the sensitivity of gut microbiome to antibiotics, mouse study finds
Antibiotics change the kinds of bacteria in the mouse gut as well as the bacteria's metabolism -- but diet can exacerbate the changes, a new study showed. (2019-09-12)
Nurse led follow-up service aids patients with respected early stage lung cancer, improves clinic efficiency
The presence of the specialist nurse within thoracic surgical centers in the United Kingdom increased clinic capacity and efficiency, reduced waiting time for appointments, promoted junior medical training and ensured continuity of care for the patients, according to an analysis reported today by Jenny Mitchell from Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, in Oxford, United Kingdom. (2019-09-10)
Long-term opioid use has known link to low testosterone but not many men screened, treated
Long-term opioid use previously has been linked with low testosterone in men. (2019-09-06)
Researchers find alarming risk for people coming off chronic opioid prescriptions
A recent study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine found an alarming outcome: Patients coming off opioids for pain were three times more likely to die of an overdose in the years that followed. (2019-09-05)
Study finds women at greater risk of depression, anxiety after hysterectomy
Hysterectomy is associated with an increased risk of long-term mental health issues, especially depression and anxiety, according to a cohort study by Mayo Clinic researchers involving nearly 2,100 women. (2019-09-04)
Psychiatric disorders may be linked to unnecessary oophorectomies
Undergoing a hysterectomy, especially in conjunction with removal of the ovaries, can take a major toll on a woman's mental health. (2019-09-04)
Study shows metabolic surgery associated with lower risk of death and heart complications
A large Cleveland Clinic study shows that weight-loss surgery performed in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity is associated with a lower risk of death and major adverse cardiovascular events than usual medical care. (2019-09-02)
New medication may be able to improve effects of psychological treatment for PTSD
A medication that boosts the body's own cannabis-like substances, endocannabinoids, shows promise to help the brain un-learn fear memories when these are no longer meaningful. (2019-08-29)
Artificial intelligence could use EKG data to measure patient's overall health status
Researchers applying artificial intelligence to electrocardiogram data estimated the age group of a patient and predicted their gender. (2019-08-27)
Genetically manipulating protein level in colon cancer cells can improve chemotherapy
Colorectal cancer outcomes may improve by genetically altering an immune-regulatory protein in cancer cells, making the cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy. (2019-08-26)
Your heart's best friend: Dog ownership associated with better cardiovascular health
Owning a pet may help maintain a healthy heart, especially if that pet is a dog, according to the first analysis of data from the Kardiozive Brno 2030 study. (2019-08-23)
Mayo Clinic study calls for screening of family members of celiac disease patients
Parents, siblings and children of people with celiac disease are at high risk of also having the disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study. (2019-08-22)
CBD products, hemp oil may be helpful but more research is needed, Mayo Clinic review says
Cannabidiol (CBD) oils and products have become increasingly popular with consumers as ways to find relief from aches and pains, anxiety, sleep disturbances and other chronic issues. (2019-08-22)
New research published in cancer discovery identifies new drug target for glioblastoma
A new international study co-led by Cleveland Clinic has identified a new drug target for treating glioblastoma. (2019-08-21)
Too much of a good thing can be dangerous, finds researchers investigating hypoglycemia
For people with diabetes, taking medications and monitoring their blood sugar is part of the rhythm of their daily lives. (2019-08-15)
Is blood pressure measured outside of clinic associated with cardiovascular disease in African-Americans?
This observational study examined whether daytime and nighttime blood pressure (BP) levels measured outside a clinical setting are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and risk of death. (2019-08-14)
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