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Current Mechanical engineering News and Events

Current Mechanical engineering News and Events, Mechanical engineering News Articles.
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2D semiconductors found to be close-to-ideal fractional quantum hall platform
Columbia University researchers report that they have observed a quantum fluid known as the fractional quantum Hall states (FQHS), one of the most delicate phases of matter, for the first time in a monolayer 2D semiconductor. (2020-07-06)
Making plastic more transparent while also adding electrical conductivity
In an effort to improve large touchscreens, LED light panels and window-mounted infrared solar cells, researchers at the University of Michigan have made plastic conductive while also making it more transparent. (2020-07-06)
Machine learning reveals vulnerabilities in 3D-printed carbon-fiber composites
Components made of glass- and carbon- fiber reinforced composites, soaring in high-performance applications, can be 3D printed. (2020-07-06)
New room-temperature liquid-metal battery could be the path to powering the future
Researchers at The University of Texas have created a new liquid battery with components that can remain molten at room temperature. (2020-07-06)
New nano-engineering strategy shows potential for improved advanced energy storage
Renewable energy platforms such as wind and solar need large-scale energy storage systems. (2020-07-03)
Study explains potential causes for 'happy hypoxia' condition in COVID-19 patients
A new research study provides possible explanations for COVID-19 patients who present with extremely low, otherwise life-threatening levels of oxygen, but no signs of dyspnea (difficulty breathing). (2020-07-02)
New plastic biomaterials could lead to tougher, more versatile medical implants
A new thermoplastic biomaterial, which is tough and strong but also easy to process and shape has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2020-07-01)
Decoding material wear with supercomputers
What happens at the atomic level cannot be observed directly. (2020-06-30)
Spider silk can create lenses useful for biological imaging
Spider silk is useful for a variety of biomedical applications: It exhibits mechanical properties superior to synthetic fibers for tissue engineering, and it is not toxic or harmful to living cells. (2020-06-30)
Seeing is believing: Effectiveness of facemasks
Using flow visualization, researchers assessed the efficacy of facemasks in obstructing respiratory droplets. (2020-06-30)
Study reveals magnetic process that can lead to more energy-efficient memory in computers
Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of California, Los Angeles have made an important advance that could lead to more energy efficient magnetic memory storage components for computers and other devices. (2020-06-30)
Researchers print, tune graphene sensors to monitor food freshness, safety
Researchers are using high-resolution printing technology and the unique properties of graphene to make low-cost biosensors to monitor food safety and livestock health. (2020-06-29)
New heart valve could transform open heart surgery for millions of patients globally
A new polymeric heart valve with a life span potentially longer than current artificial valves that would also prevent the need for the millions of patients with diseased heart valves to require life-long blood thinning tablets has been developed by scientists at the universities of Bristol and Cambridge. (2020-06-29)
Stanford-led team shows how to store data using 2D materials instead of silicon chips
The researchers stacked layers of tungsten ditelluride like a nanoscale deck of cards. (2020-06-29)
Multifunctional nanofiber protects against explosions
Harvard University researchers, in collaboration with the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Soldier Center (CCDC SC) and West Point, have developed a lightweight, multifunctional nanofiber material that can protect wearers from both extreme temperatures and ballistic threats. (2020-06-29)
Researchers catch a wave to determine how forces control granular material properties
Stress wave propagation through grainy, or granular, materials is important for detecting the magnitude of earthquakes, locating oil and gas reservoirs, designing acoustic insulation and designing materials for compacting powders. (2020-06-29)
Cellulose for manufacturing advanced materials
The last decade has seen an increase in scientific publications and patents on cellulose, the most abundant natural polymer. (2020-06-26)
Novel and simple method to engineer a platform mimicking blood vessels
SUTD collaborated with Keio University to design and fabricate a versatile platform to replicate the pulsatile blood flow in blood vessels, which allows for in-depth investigation into pathological conditions. (2020-06-26)
From the lab, the first cartilage-mimicking gel that's strong enough for knees
The thin, slippery layer of cartilage between the bones in the knee is magical stuff: strong enough to withstand a person's weight, but soft and supple enough to cushion the joint against impact, over decades of repeat use. (2020-06-26)
KIST develops eco-friendly, flame-retardant carbon plastic ideal for recycling
A flame-retardant carbon-fiber-reinforced composite material has been developed. Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team from its Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, headed by Dr. (2020-06-24)
Researchers use electric fields to herd cells like flocks of sheep
Princeton researchers have created a device that can herd groups of cells like sheep, precisely directing the cells' movements by manipulating electric fields to mimic those found in the body during healing. (2020-06-24)
Self-powered alarm fights forest fires, monitors environment
Scientists designed and fabricated a remote forest fire detection and alarm system powered by nothing but the movement of the trees in the wind. (2020-06-24)
Laser allows solid-state refrigeration of a semiconductor material
A team from the University of Washington used an infrared laser to cool a solid semiconductor by at least 20 degrees C, or 36 F, below room temperature, as they report in a paper published June 23 in Nature Communications. (2020-06-23)
Synthetic materials mimic living creatures
Researchers have developed a family of soft materials that imitates living creatures. (2020-06-22)
Microbubbles controlled by acoustical tweezers for highly localized drug release
Microbubbles are used every day as contrast agents in medical sonography, and are the subject of intense research for the delivery of therapeutic agents. (2020-06-22)
Cell removal as the result of a mechanical instability
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in the Biophysical Journal that the process of cell removal from an epithelial layer follows from an inherent mechanical instability. (2020-06-19)
Simulating wind farm development
Engineers have devised a model to describe how, in the process of establishing wind farms, interactions between developers and landowners affect energy production costs. (2020-06-19)
Researchers make next-generation, high-toughness battery component
By combining a ceramic material with graphene, Brown University engineers have made what they say is the toughest solid electrolyte built to date. (2020-06-18)
Research brief: New discovery allows 3D printing of sensors directly on expanding organs
In groundbreaking new research, mechanical engineers and computer scientists at the University of Minnesota have developed a 3D printing technique that uses motion capture technology, similar to that used in Hollywood movies, to print electronic sensors directly on organs that are expanding and contracting. (2020-06-17)
The rafts used by viruses
The study may suggest new strategies to limit virus attacks and prevent or combat diseases like Sars and Covid-19 based on biomedical and engineering principles. (2020-06-16)
3D X-ray reveals secrets from inside bones
An international team of researchers from Aarhus University, the European Synchotron (ESRF), Chalmers University and the Paul Scherrer Institute have uncovered a previously unknown substructure in bone tissue using a new X-ray technique to produce 3D images of the internal structure of bones. (2020-06-15)
A raft that won't save you
New interdisciplinary research published in the Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids sheds light on how and why the cell membrane forms and grows lipid rafts triggered by ligand-receptor activity. (2020-06-15)
Minimizing thermal conductivity of crystalline material with optimal nanostructure
Japanese researchers successfully minimized thermal conductivity by designing, fabricating, and evaluating the optimal nanostructure-multilayer materials through materials informatics (MI), which combines machine learning and molecular simulation. (2020-06-12)
Unlocking PNA's superpowers for self-assembling nanostructures
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a method for self-assembling nanostructures with gamma-modified peptide nucleic acid, a synthetic mimic of DNA. (2020-06-12)
Acoustics put a fresh spin on electron transitions
Electrons are very much at the mercy of magnetic fields, which scientists can manipulate to control the electrons and their angular momentum -- i.e. their 'spin.' (2020-06-10)
A robot to track and film flying insects
French scientists have developed the first cable-driven robot that can follow and interact with free-flying insects. (2020-06-10)
Ischemic stroke rates decrease during COVID-19 pandemic
Research reveals fewer people have been admitted to stroke centers in Michigan and northwest Ohio since the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic, and significantly fewer patients received a mechanical thrombectomy for their ischemic stroke. (2020-06-09)
Predicting cancer behavior requires better understanding of tumor cells
Our ability to predict who will get cancer, how patients will respond to treatment, or if patients will relapse is still quite limited, despite advances in the detection of genetic mutations and the establishment of risk factors; recently researchers were inspired to find new ways of looking at the problem. (2020-06-09)
Spontaneous formation of nanoscale hollow structures could boost battery storage
An unexpected property of nanometer-scale antimony crystals -- the spontaneous formation of hollow structures -- could help give the next generation of lithium ion batteries higher energy density without reducing battery lifetime. (2020-06-08)
First measurement of electron energy distributions, could enable sustainable energy technologies
To answer a question crucial to technologies such as energy conversion, a team of researchers at the University of Michigan, Purdue University and the University of Liverpool in the UK have figured out a way to measure how many 'hot charge carriers' -- for example, electrons with extra energy -- are present in a metal nanostructure. (2020-06-05)
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