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Current Medicaid News and Events

Current Medicaid News and Events, Medicaid News Articles.
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Reforming pharmacy benefit manager practices may lead to drug cost savings
Efforts to control health care costs in the United States often focus on the listed prescription drug prices, but unregulated pharmacy benefit manager practices also may contribute to escalating expenses, according to a perspective published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (2019-06-21)
Nursing home care cost significantly outpaces general inflation and medical care prices
One of the largest studies on out-of-pocket costs for nursing home care finds prices are high and rising faster than other medical care and consumer prices, reports a team of health policy researchers. (2019-06-20)
How was Medicaid expansion associated with rates of child maltreatment?
State-level data were analyzed to determine whether Medicaid expansion was associated with changes in rates of physical abuse and neglect of children younger than 6. (2019-06-14)
Lower rates of opioid prescriptions in states that implemented medical cannabis use laws
Using data from privately-insured adults, new findings from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston revealed that there is a lower level of opioids prescribed in states that have allowed the use of medical marijuana. (2019-06-11)
Medicaid expansion associated with fewer cardiovascular deaths
Expanding Medicaid eligibility was associated with lower rates of death from cardiovascular causes in a study comparing data from counties in 29 states that expanded Medicaid with 19 states that didn't from 2010 to 2016. (2019-06-05)
First states to expand Medicaid saw larger screening rate increases
The five states and District of Columbia that first adopted Medicaid expansion saw larger increases in cancer screening than those states that did not. (2019-05-22)
Boston Medical Center develops EHR-based social needs screener to improve patient outcomes
Boston Medical Center (BMC) has implemented a social determinants of health screener for primary care patients in order to better identify and address patients' unmet social needs. (2019-05-16)
In rural areas, buprenorphine is provided by primary care clinicians
As the United States undertakes intense efforts to increase the number of prescribers of buprenorphine for opioid use disorder, it is critical to understand who currently provides such treatment and how. (2019-05-14)
Does health care help us live longer?
A widely cited statistic suggests that health care services account for only a small percentage of the variation in American life expectancy. (2019-05-14)
Stark racial, financial divides found in opioid addiction treatment
Escaping the grip of opioid addiction doesn't come easily for anyone. (2019-05-08)
Patients insured by marketplace health plan less likely to receive a medical appointment
Among adults with mental health needs, those covered by Medicare or employer-sponsored health insurance have greater access to medical treatment, less out-of-pocket cost and are more likely to receive care than those seeking an appointment through an Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplace-sponsored plan, according to findings from researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2019-05-07)
Patients of medicare providers committing fraud, abuse more likely to be poor, disabled
A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health analyzed providers excluded from Medicare for fraud and abuse, and found that the patients they treated prior to being banned were more likely to be minorities, disabled and dually-enrolled in Medicaid to supplement financial assistance for health care. (2019-05-07)
Research suggests strategy for more equitable Medicare reimbursement
Those who were enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid were sicker, had more cognitive impairments and difficulty functioning, and needed more social support than those who were not enrolled in both government programs, Saint Louis University research found. (2019-04-29)
Readmission penalties for safety net hospitals drop under new rules
Readmission penalties against hospitals providing care to socioeconomically disadvantaged patients have dropped 14 percentage points under new rules adopted in 2019 that more equitably account for low-income populations being served, according to a new analysis led by UT Southwestern Medical Center and Harvard researchers. (2019-04-29)
New study aims to understand opioid fill patterns in children
Improved understanding of current opioid prescription trends in children is needed to inform development of future pediatric pain management guidelines. (2019-04-27)
Despite increase in insurance coverage for depression, growth in spending remains modest
A new investigation finds that while insurance coverage for depression has increased, treatment rates are lower than expected, indicating that non-financial barriers to patient care still remain. (2019-04-24)
Stroke patients receive different amounts of physical therapy
Medicare-covered stroke patients receive vastly different amounts of physical and occupational therapy during hospital stays despite evidence that such care is strongly associated with positive health outcomes, a new study by Brown University researchers found. (2019-04-24)
Is state medicaid expansion associated with changes in low birth weight, preterm births?
This observational study examined whether state Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act was associated with changes in low birth weight and preterm birth both overall and by race/ethnicity. (2019-04-23)
Low use of hearing aids among older Hispanic/Latino adults in US
This study examined how common hearing aids were and the factors associated with their use among a group of nearly 1,900 adults (average age 60) of Hispanic/Latino backgrounds with hearing loss. (2019-04-18)
Safety-net hospitals fare better under new Medicare reimbursement rules
New Medicare reimbursement rules provide some relief to safety-net hospitals, shifting the burden of financial penalties toward hospitals serving wealthier patient populations, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-04-15)
Medicaid could save $2.6 billion within a year if just 1% of recipients quit smoking
Reducing smoking, and its associated health effects, among Medicaid recipients in each state by just 1 percent would result in $2.6 billion in total Medicaid savings the following year, according to new research by UC San Francisco. (2019-04-12)
Medicaid reimbursement to treat cancer patients with radiation therapy varies widely
A new study finds wide state-by-state variations in Medicaid reimbursements to physicians who treat cancer patients with radiation therapies. (2019-04-11)
New study finds higher C-section infection risk for mothers on Medicaid
The risk of surgical site infection following cesarean delivery is higher among Medicaid-insured women when compared to women who were privately insured, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-04-10)
Socioeconomic status associated with likelihood of receiving a heart pump
Racial/ethnic minorities, patients who are uninsured or only have Medicaid insurance and those living in low-income ZIP codes were less likely to receive a heart pumping device known as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). (2019-04-06)
Fewer people died from heart disease in states that expanded Medicaid coverage through the Affordable Care Act
Counties in states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act had fewer deaths annually from heart disease compared to areas that did not expand Medicaid, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2019. (2019-04-05)
Study links insurance coverage to access to hospital care
Compared to privately insured patients, individuals who lack insurance or use Medicaid are more likely to be transferred to another hospital after receiving initial treatment in the emergency department (ED). (2019-04-01)
Are the uninsured and medicaid patients more likely to be transferred to another hospital?
This study analyzed 215,000 emergency department (ED) visits to 160 US hospitals to see if patients with the common conditions of pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma were more likely to be discharged from the ED or transferred to another hospital after being stabilized based on their insurance status. (2019-04-01)
Adults with mental health, substance disorders more likely subject to Medicaid work rules
A new research study has found that Medicaid enrollees with behavioral health and other chronic conditions are less likely to be working part or full time than those without these conditions, making it less likely they will meet new or proposed work requirements for Medicaid that have been implemented or proposed in some states. (2019-04-01)
Experts discover historic roots of Medicare for All, public option and free-market proposals
As political leaders debate the future of the US health care system, a pair of health financing experts discovered that all of the current proposals -- from Medicare for All to 'repeal and replace' -- have been circulating in various forms since the 1940s. (2019-04-01)
Affordable Care Act delivers significant benefits for women
According to a new study appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, the rate of health insurance coverage and access to affordable acute and preventive care services improved for women after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (2019-03-21)
WVU researcher finds some Medicaid populations more likely to die by suicide
A West Virginia University researcher has discovered the suicide rate of some Medicaid-insured youth -- including girls and young women -- is higher than those with private insurance. (2019-03-20)
Healthy food prescriptions could save lives and money
Healthy food prescriptions through Medicare and Medicaid could generate substantial health gains and be highly cost-effective, according to a study published March 19 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Yujin Lee and Dariush Mozaffarian of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, Massachusetts, United States and colleagues. (2019-03-19)
Prescribing healthy food in Medicare/Medicaid is cost effective, could improve health
A team of researchers modeled the health and economic effects of healthy food prescriptions in Medicare and Medicaid. (2019-03-19)
Since 1990s, heart attacks have become less deadly, frequent for Americans
Heart attack prevention and outcomes have dramatically improved for American adults in the past two decades, according to a Yale study in JAMA Network Open. (2019-03-15)
Administration budget proposal undermined by concurrent cuts
The White House budget proposal for 2020 recommends increases to the domestic HIV programs at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Services Administration and Indian Health Services that will be essential to keeping the administration's promise of ending our nation's HIV epidemic in the next decade. (2019-03-12)
Study reveals disparities in osteoporosis treatment by sex and race/ethnicity
New research indicates that elderly men are significantly undertreated for osteoporosis compared with elderly women, and blacks have the lowest treatment rates among racial/ethnic groups. (2019-03-06)
Health insurance is not assurance of healthcare
Because of high out-of-pocket expenses, Ohioans who purchase subsidized health-exchange insurance often can't afford the care they need when they need it. (2019-02-27)
Medicaid expansion led to increase in screening for colorectal cancer patients in Kentucky
The number of low-income patients screened for colorectal cancer more than tripled after Medicaid expansion in 2014, according to study findings in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. (2019-02-22)
Study: ACA Medicaid expansion shows impact on colon cancer screenings, survival in Kentucky
A new University of Kentucky study published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows a direct link between the adoption of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion and the impact of colon cancer on Kentuckians. (2019-02-22)
Access to federally qualified health centers does not translate into lower rates of ED use
There is no association between access to federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and emergency department visits for either uninsured or Medicaid-insured patients. (2019-02-11)
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