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Current Medicaid News and Events

Current Medicaid News and Events, Medicaid News Articles.
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Coordinated care model leads to decreases in unscheduled, preventable hospitalizations
Oregon Medicaid enrollees are less likely to make unscheduled trips to the hospital following the implementation of the state's accountable-care model, new research shows. (2019-10-07)
Study shows reduced Illinois Medicaid spending in pediatric population, limited savings from care coordination
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago are reporting in JAMA Network Open that Medicaid expenditures for children and young adults have decreased in Illinois. (2019-10-04)
Expanding Medicaid means chronic health problems get found & health improves, study finds
Nearly one in three low-income people who enrolled in Michigan's expanded Medicaid program discovered they had a common chronic illness that had never been diagnosed before, according to a new study. (2019-09-30)
Benefits for mind, body and work ability seen in Medicaid Expansion study
Expanding Medicaid to more low-income adults helped many of them feel healthier, and do a better job at work or a job search, in just one year after they got their new health coverage, a new study finds. (2019-09-25)
Doctors are not using tools to help youths quit smoking
At a time when the rapid growth in electronic cigarette ''vaping'' among young people threatens to reverse decades of progress in reducing tobacco use, a large study published today in JAMA Pediatrics finds that medical professionals are largely failing to use existing tools to help young people quit smoking. (2019-09-23)
Undocumented immigrants' transplant survival rates on par with US citizens'
Unauthorized immigrants who receive liver transplants in the United States have comparable three-year survival rates to US citizens, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2019-09-20)
Dartmouth study examines prevalence of screening for social needs
A new study from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice finds that most US physician practices and hospitals report screening patients for at least one social need, a trend that is expected to increase in the future, and that practices that care for disadvantaged patients report higher screening rates. (2019-09-18)
Trump administration's public charge rule presents threat to health, conclude scholars
The Trump administration's 'public charge' rule, which would subject legal immigrants to a public charge determination if they use public health, nutrition and housing benefits for which they are eligible, represents a major threat to health, according to a 'friend of the court' brief filed Sept. (2019-09-11)
Study shows cost savings from same-day long-acting reversible contraception
According to a new study by Indiana University School of Medicine doctors, providing adolescents seeking birth control the ability to obtain a long-acting reversible contraceptive on the same day as their clinic visit could lead to significant cost savings for insurance providers. (2019-09-11)
Prescription drug monitoring program mandates
States that require prescribers to register with and use prescription drug monitoring programs in most clinical circumstances saw notably fewer opioid prescriptions and reduced opioid-related hospital use by Medicaid patients compared to states with weak or no drug monitoring program mandates, according to a new study from investigators at Weill Cornell Medicine. (2019-09-03)
Intimate partner violence against women creates economic hardship, Rutgers study finds
Women who experience intimate partner violence, including physical, emotional, and controlling abuse, are more likely to suffer material hardship -- the inability to purchase food, housing, utilities, medical care or other needs for a healthy life, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2019-08-27)
Kidney transplants covered by Medicaid increased in states after Medicaid expansion
Medicaid expansion has helped more young, low-income adults with advanced kidney disease to avoid the costs and poor quality-of-life associated with dialysis, reports a study from researchers at Drexel University College of Medicine and the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel. (2019-08-20)
Hospital ratings systems get low grades from experts
Experts have turned the tables on hospital rating systems and graded the rating systems on their strengths and weaknesses. (2019-08-14)
Industry payments to physician director of NCI-designated cancer centers
Data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services were used to examine industry payments to physician directors of National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers in this research letter. (2019-08-05)
Researchers estimate societal costs of the opioid epidemic
The devastating consequences of the opioid crisis are far-reaching in the United States, impacting public health as well as social and economic welfare. (2019-07-30)
Medicare for All unlikely to cause surge in hospital use: Harvard study
Despite some analysts' claims that Medicare for All would cause a sharp increase in health care utilization, a new study finds the two biggest coverage expansions in US history -- Medicare and the ACA -- caused no net increase in hospital use. (2019-07-22)
New research finds private practice physicians less likely to maintain electronic records
The research led by Jordan Everson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), finds striking differences in use of electronic health records (EHRs) among more than 291,000 physicians included in the study. (2019-07-19)
Many still uninsured after Affordable Care Act Implementation
In community health centers in Medicaid expansion states, among established patients who were uninsured prior to the Affordable Care Act, many remained uninsured after implementation of the Obama-era law. (2019-07-10)
Nonphysician practitioners absorbing more new patient requests post Affordable Care Act
The advent of the Affordable Care Act has led to millions of new patients seeking primary care. (2019-07-10)
New initiative improved care for sepsis patients, but black patients saw smaller benefits
The New York Sepsis Initiative was launched in 2014 with the goal of improving the prompt identification and treatment of sepsis. (2019-07-01)
New data resource reveals highly variable staffing at nursing homes
Researchers who analyzed payroll-based staffing data for US nursing homes discovered large daily staffing fluctuations, low weekend staffing and daily staffing levels that often fall well below the expectations of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), all of which can increase the risk of adverse events for residents. (2019-07-01)
Medically unnecessary ambulance rides soar after ACA expansion
CU Denver researcher discovered that medically unnecessary ambulance rides have drastically increased due to the expansion of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (2019-06-28)
Despite the ACA, millions of Americans with cardiovascular disease still can't get care
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death for Americans, yet millions with CVD or cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) still can't access the care they need, even years after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (2019-06-27)
Repeat ER users changed how they used ERs after gaining medicaid coverage
A new study sought to determine how the nature of visits to emergency departments (EDs) changed for previously uninsured patients who gained Medicaid insurance expansion under the ACA and who went to the ED at least once before and once after expansion. (2019-06-25)
Reforming pharmacy benefit manager practices may lead to drug cost savings
Efforts to control health care costs in the United States often focus on the listed prescription drug prices, but unregulated pharmacy benefit manager practices also may contribute to escalating expenses, according to a perspective published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (2019-06-21)
Nursing home care cost significantly outpaces general inflation and medical care prices
One of the largest studies on out-of-pocket costs for nursing home care finds prices are high and rising faster than other medical care and consumer prices, reports a team of health policy researchers. (2019-06-20)
How was Medicaid expansion associated with rates of child maltreatment?
State-level data were analyzed to determine whether Medicaid expansion was associated with changes in rates of physical abuse and neglect of children younger than 6. (2019-06-14)
Lower rates of opioid prescriptions in states that implemented medical cannabis use laws
Using data from privately-insured adults, new findings from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston revealed that there is a lower level of opioids prescribed in states that have allowed the use of medical marijuana. (2019-06-11)
Medicaid expansion associated with fewer cardiovascular deaths
Expanding Medicaid eligibility was associated with lower rates of death from cardiovascular causes in a study comparing data from counties in 29 states that expanded Medicaid with 19 states that didn't from 2010 to 2016. (2019-06-05)
First states to expand Medicaid saw larger screening rate increases
The five states and District of Columbia that first adopted Medicaid expansion saw larger increases in cancer screening than those states that did not. (2019-05-22)
Boston Medical Center develops EHR-based social needs screener to improve patient outcomes
Boston Medical Center (BMC) has implemented a social determinants of health screener for primary care patients in order to better identify and address patients' unmet social needs. (2019-05-16)
In rural areas, buprenorphine is provided by primary care clinicians
As the United States undertakes intense efforts to increase the number of prescribers of buprenorphine for opioid use disorder, it is critical to understand who currently provides such treatment and how. (2019-05-14)
Does health care help us live longer?
A widely cited statistic suggests that health care services account for only a small percentage of the variation in American life expectancy. (2019-05-14)
Stark racial, financial divides found in opioid addiction treatment
Escaping the grip of opioid addiction doesn't come easily for anyone. (2019-05-08)
Patients insured by marketplace health plan less likely to receive a medical appointment
Among adults with mental health needs, those covered by Medicare or employer-sponsored health insurance have greater access to medical treatment, less out-of-pocket cost and are more likely to receive care than those seeking an appointment through an Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplace-sponsored plan, according to findings from researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2019-05-07)
Patients of medicare providers committing fraud, abuse more likely to be poor, disabled
A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health analyzed providers excluded from Medicare for fraud and abuse, and found that the patients they treated prior to being banned were more likely to be minorities, disabled and dually-enrolled in Medicaid to supplement financial assistance for health care. (2019-05-07)
Research suggests strategy for more equitable Medicare reimbursement
Those who were enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid were sicker, had more cognitive impairments and difficulty functioning, and needed more social support than those who were not enrolled in both government programs, Saint Louis University research found. (2019-04-29)
Readmission penalties for safety net hospitals drop under new rules
Readmission penalties against hospitals providing care to socioeconomically disadvantaged patients have dropped 14 percentage points under new rules adopted in 2019 that more equitably account for low-income populations being served, according to a new analysis led by UT Southwestern Medical Center and Harvard researchers. (2019-04-29)
New study aims to understand opioid fill patterns in children
Improved understanding of current opioid prescription trends in children is needed to inform development of future pediatric pain management guidelines. (2019-04-27)
Despite increase in insurance coverage for depression, growth in spending remains modest
A new investigation finds that while insurance coverage for depression has increased, treatment rates are lower than expected, indicating that non-financial barriers to patient care still remain. (2019-04-24)
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