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Current Medicare News and Events

Current Medicare News and Events, Medicare News Articles.
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One-fifth of US surgeons still overusing riskier procedure to create kidney dialysis access
Long-term hemodialysis is a lifesaver for approximately half a million patients in the United States with kidney failure (also known as end-stage renal disease, or ESRD) who are either waiting on or unsuitable for a kidney transplant. (2019-06-13)
Costs of care similar or lower at teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals
Total costs of care are similar or somewhat lower among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals among Medicare beneficiaries treated for common medical and surgical conditions, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. (2019-06-07)
Should STEMI patients recover in the ICU?
Providers need more clear guidance on whether a patient who has suffered from STEMI heart attack should recover in the intensive care unit, a new University of Michigan study, published in The BMJ, finds. (2019-06-04)
New study evaluates transcatheter dialysis conduit procedures over 15 years
A new research study by Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute found that utilization of invasive procedures on hemodialysis conduits -- artificially constructed shuts used by many individuals who require dialysis -- increased markedly from 2001 through 2015 for nephrologists and declined for radiologists. (2019-05-29)
Medicare spending higher among older adults with disabilities who lack adequate support
A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that more than one in five older adults who were aging in place with a mobility or self-care disability reported experiencing negative consequences such as having to stay in bed or going without eating due to no one being available to help or the activity being too difficult to perform alone. (2019-05-28)
Does fracture risk differ between 2 common types of weight-loss surgery?
This study used Medicare claims data to compare risk of fracture among about 42,000 patients who had weight-loss surgery. (2019-05-15)
Rates of long-term opiate use rises in Medicare cancer survivors each year after diagnosis
Using Medicare data, new findings from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston show for the first time that the rates of long term opiate therapy for older cancer survivors remain high for at least five years in cancer survivors. (2019-05-14)
Does health care help us live longer?
A widely cited statistic suggests that health care services account for only a small percentage of the variation in American life expectancy. (2019-05-14)
For-profit dialysis provider charges private insurers 4 times more than government payers
Private insurers covering people receiving treatment for dialysis paid four times more than government insurance programs such as Medicare paid for the same service. (2019-05-14)
Private health plans pay hospitals 2.4 times what Medicare would pay
Hospital costs account for nearly half of all personal health spending for the privately insured, but relatively is known about how much more the privately insured pay hospitals relative to Medicare patients. (2019-05-09)
Nurse care coordinators are key to success of patient-centered medical home programs
In a new study, George Mason University faculty researchers assessed primary care provider experiences with the CareFirst Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) program. (2019-05-09)
Patients insured by marketplace health plan less likely to receive a medical appointment
Among adults with mental health needs, those covered by Medicare or employer-sponsored health insurance have greater access to medical treatment, less out-of-pocket cost and are more likely to receive care than those seeking an appointment through an Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplace-sponsored plan, according to findings from researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2019-05-07)
Patients of medicare providers committing fraud, abuse more likely to be poor, disabled
A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health analyzed providers excluded from Medicare for fraud and abuse, and found that the patients they treated prior to being banned were more likely to be minorities, disabled and dually-enrolled in Medicaid to supplement financial assistance for health care. (2019-05-07)
External reference drug pricing could save Medicare tens of billions
A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that prices for brand-name prescription drugs averaged 3.2 to 4.1 times higher in the US when compared with prices in the United Kingdom, Japan and the Canadian province of Ontario. (2019-05-06)
Elderly survivors of three common cancers face persistent risk of brain metastasis
Elderly survivors of breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma face risk of brain metastasis later in life, and may require extra surveillance in the years following initial cancer treatment. (2019-05-03)
Research suggests strategy for more equitable Medicare reimbursement
Those who were enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid were sicker, had more cognitive impairments and difficulty functioning, and needed more social support than those who were not enrolled in both government programs, Saint Louis University research found. (2019-04-29)
Readmission penalties for safety net hospitals drop under new rules
Readmission penalties against hospitals providing care to socioeconomically disadvantaged patients have dropped 14 percentage points under new rules adopted in 2019 that more equitably account for low-income populations being served, according to a new analysis led by UT Southwestern Medical Center and Harvard researchers. (2019-04-29)
Stroke patients receive different amounts of physical therapy
Medicare-covered stroke patients receive vastly different amounts of physical and occupational therapy during hospital stays despite evidence that such care is strongly associated with positive health outcomes, a new study by Brown University researchers found. (2019-04-24)
Commentary: Modifications to Medicare rules could support care innovation for dialysis
Public health researchers suggest adjustments to recently proposed rule changes on how Medicare pays for dialysis services. (2019-04-19)
Primary care services account for a small share of Medicare spending, study finds
Some states including Oregon and Rhode Island have begun adopting minimum primary care spending goals because health system orientation toward primary care is associated with higher quality, better outcomes and lower costs. (2019-04-15)
Safety-net hospitals fare better under new Medicare reimbursement rules
New Medicare reimbursement rules provide some relief to safety-net hospitals, shifting the burden of financial penalties toward hospitals serving wealthier patient populations, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-04-15)
Cancer drug shortages result in almost no treatment changes, USC study finds
For the vast majority of cancer drugs experiencing shortages over a seven-year period, a new USC research study found no statistically significant effect of shortages on chemotherapy treatment. (2019-04-08)
The decline of state-level IVC filter utilization
National inferior vena cava (IVC) filter utilization in the Medicare population has declined over the last decade according to a prior Harvey L. (2019-04-04)
Study finds lower death rates for TAVR centers that do more procedures
Hospitals that perform the highest volume of transcatheter-aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures have significantly lower mortality rates than centers that do fewer of the minimally invasive surgeries. (2019-04-03)
How common are advanced care planning conversations with hospitalized, older patients?
A research team from Dartmouth College analyzed advanced care planning (ACP) billing at a national physician practice and found that despite incentives, the rate of ACP-billed conversations was low and varied greatly among physicians and practice sites. (2019-04-01)
Counties with more trees and shrubs spend less on Medicare, study finds
A new study finds that Medicare costs tend to be lower in counties with more forests and shrublands than in counties dominated by other types of land cover. (2019-04-01)
BU finds Medicare Advantage networks are broad and getting broader
A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that networks in Medicare Advantage -- a private plan alternative to traditional Medicare -- are relatively broad and may be getting broader. (2019-04-01)
Experts discover historic roots of Medicare for All, public option and free-market proposals
As political leaders debate the future of the US health care system, a pair of health financing experts discovered that all of the current proposals -- from Medicare for All to 'repeal and replace' -- have been circulating in various forms since the 1940s. (2019-04-01)
A viable alternative to Medicare-for-all? We can and must do better!
Medicare-for-all, a solution that would bring United States healthcare policies more in line with other industrial nations, faces strong opposition and is unlikely to be enacted in the foreseeable future. (2019-03-25)
New model found effective in predicting risk of opioid overdose
A new study sought to develop and validate a way to predict the risk of opioid overdose among Medicare beneficiaries with at least one opioid prescription. (2019-03-22)
Stroke risk drops in both black and white older adults
Recent reductions in hospitalization and death due to stroke extend to both black and white Medicare beneficiaries, reports a study in the April issue of Medical Care. (2019-03-20)
Healthy food prescriptions could save lives and money
Healthy food prescriptions through Medicare and Medicaid could generate substantial health gains and be highly cost-effective, according to a study published March 19 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Yujin Lee and Dariush Mozaffarian of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, Massachusetts, United States and colleagues. (2019-03-19)
Prescribing healthy food in Medicare/Medicaid is cost effective, could improve health
A team of researchers modeled the health and economic effects of healthy food prescriptions in Medicare and Medicaid. (2019-03-19)
Since 1990s, heart attacks have become less deadly, frequent for Americans
Heart attack prevention and outcomes have dramatically improved for American adults in the past two decades, according to a Yale study in JAMA Network Open. (2019-03-15)
Social risk factors and readmission penalties
New research shows that US safety net hospitals could benefit substantially from a new model that accounts for social risk factors like poverty and living in a disadvantaged neighborhood in determining how the federal government penalizes hospitals financially for their readmission rates. (2019-03-14)
Timing of Medicare loss may affect long-term success of kidney transplantation
Kidney transplant recipients under 65 years of age qualify for Medicare coverage following transplantation, but coverage ends after three years. (2019-03-06)
Study reveals disparities in osteoporosis treatment by sex and race/ethnicity
New research indicates that elderly men are significantly undertreated for osteoporosis compared with elderly women, and blacks have the lowest treatment rates among racial/ethnic groups. (2019-03-06)
Surprise billing debate continues to transfix state and federal policy makers
This briefing paper seeks to bring needed clarity to the feverish, ongoing surprise billing debate underway on the state and federal level. (2019-03-06)
Bundle payment model analysis of emerging breast cancer screening
Bundled payments have been touted as mechanisms to optimize quality and costs. (2019-03-04)
Is guideline-recommended therapy for coronary artery disease more likely in Medicare Advantage?
Medicare Advantage is Medicare's managed-care alternative to traditional fee-for-service Medicare. (2019-02-20)
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