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Current Medicare News and Events

Current Medicare News and Events, Medicare News Articles.
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People with Type 1 diabetes spend $2,500 a year in health care costs
Adults and children with type 1 diabetes will spend an average of $2,500 a year out-of-pocket for health care -- but insulin isn't always the biggest expense -- new research suggests. (2020-06-01)
Report looks to improve quality measures for medical care of homebound older adults
There are an estimated 2 million older adults who are homebound or unable to leave their homes due to multiple chronic conditions and functional impairment. (2020-05-22)
Federal program leads to intensified treatment for high-risk heart patients
A program that offers financial incentives to health care providers to measure and reduce heart attack and stroke risk among Medicare patients resulted in increased preventive medications prescribed to patients in high-risk and medium-risk categories. (2020-05-15)
Answers to these questions can help #Decision2020 build momentum for Americans as we age
With primary and general elections on the horizon across the US, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today released a series of high-priority questions for candidates. (2020-05-14)
Illuminating the impact of COVID-19 on hospitals and health systems
In the third week of March 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic escalated, large hospitals in the Northeast experienced a 26 percent decline in average per-facility revenues based on estimated in-network amounts as compared to the same period in 2019. (2020-05-12)
Fatty liver disease is underdiagnosed in the US
According to an analysis published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is grossly underdiagnosed in the United States. (2020-05-06)
Rheumatoid arthritis patients on medicare seeing increased costs for specialty medications
After a sharp drop in out-of-pocket costs between 2010 and 2011, Medicare patients who use specialty biologic medications for rheumatoid arthritis have seen higher out-of-pocket spending for those same drugs because of gradual price increases, a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association Open finds. (2020-05-01)
Medicare coverage varies for transgender hormone therapies
A new study has shown substantial variability in access to guideline-recommended hormone therapies for older transgender individuals insured through Medicare. (2020-04-13)
Medicare changes may increase access to TAVR
The number of hospitals providing TAVR could double with changes to Medicare requirements. (2020-04-06)
Adding a measure of patient frailty to Medicare payment model could lead to fairer reimbursement for clinicians
Researchers identified a way to measure frailty using patients' medical claims that more accurately predicts costs-of-care, especially for clinicians with disproportionate shares of frail patients. (2020-04-06)
Half of 65+ adults lack dental insurance; poll finds strong support for Medicare coverage
Nearly all older Americans support adding a dental benefit to the Medicare program that covers most people over age 65, according to a new national poll that also reveals how often costs get in the way of oral health for older adults. (2020-03-24)
Capping out-of-network hospital bills could create big savings
Placing limits on what hospitals can charge for out-of-network care has been proposed by some groups and a few health plans including Medicare Advantage already enforce such caps. (2020-03-12)
Study unveils striking disparities in health outcomes among 2 populations
In a new study published today in JAMA, a team of researchers at BIDMC evaluated how health outcomes for low-income older adults who are dually enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid have changed since the early 2000s, and whether disparities have narrowed or widened over time compared with more affluent older adults who are solely enrolled in Medicare. (2020-03-11)
Differences between self-identified general practitioners and board-certified family doctors
Physicians who identify as 'general practitioners' are a group distinct from board-certified 'family physicians,' according to a new study that was supported, in part, by the American Board of Family Medicine Foundation. (2020-03-09)
Study shows dietitians are an effective part of weight loss
A new study in the journal Family Practice indicates that intensive behavioral therapy from dietitians may be a very effective ways for older Americans to lose weight. (2020-02-20)
PSU study finds out-of-network primary care tied to rising ACO costs
Accountable Care Organizations -- or ACOs -- formed for the first time in 2011, designed to combat rising medical costs and provide more coordinated care to Medicare patients. (2020-02-14)
Shingles vaccine may also reduce stroke risk
The shingles vaccine appears to reduce stroke risk by about 16% in older adults. (2020-02-12)
Middle-aged adults worried about health insurance costs now, uncertain for future
Health insurance costs weigh heavily on the minds of many middle-aged adults, and many are worried for what they'll face in retirement or if federal health policies change, according to a new study. (2020-02-07)
Inequitable medicare reimbursements threaten care of most vulnerable
Hospitals, doctors and Medicare Advantage insurance plans that care for some of the most vulnerable patients are not reimbursed fairly by Medicare, according to recent findings in JAMA. (2020-02-07)
For aging patients, one missed doctor's visit can lead to vision loss
Visit adherence plays an important role in outcomes for patients with age-related macular degeneration, a Penn Medicine study found. (2020-02-06)
Study finds association between therapy time, length of stay after hip fracture surgery
Researchers in the George Washington University Advanced Metrics Lab found that a hip fracture patient's length of stay in a rehabilitation facility has a greater impact on functional independence than therapy time per day (2020-01-27)
Medicare may overpay for many surgical procedures
For most surgical procedures, Medicare provides physicians a single bundled payment that covers both the procedure and related postoperative care over a period of up to 90 days. (2020-01-22)
New study examines mortality costs of air pollution in US
Scholars from the Gies College of Business at Illinois studied the effects of acute fine particulate matter exposure on mortality, health care use and medical costs among older Americans through Medicare data and changes in local wind direction. (2020-01-21)
America's largest medical specialty society endorses single-payer Medicare for All
Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP) today welcomed the American College of Physicians' (ACP) endorsement of single-payer Medicare for All. (2020-01-20)
Comparing cancer costs is challenging, despite new price transparency rules
A federal rule that requires hospitals to publicly list standard charges for services and procedures -- the foundation of price transparency -- does not facilitate comparison shopping for a standard radiation treatment for prostate cancer at National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers, according to a study led by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers. (2020-01-16)
Research shows that older patients with untreated sleep apnea need greater medical care
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and costly medical Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) found that the medical costs are substantially higher among older adults who go untreated for obstructive sleep apnea. (2020-01-16)
Older undiagnosed sleep apnea patients need more medical care
Older adults with undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea seek more health care, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. (2020-01-16)
Study challenges concerns over hospital readmission reduction practices
A UT Southwestern study is challenging concerns that a federal health policy enacted in 2012 to reduce hospital readmissions leaves patients more vulnerable. (2020-01-15)
Only 1 in 4 Medicare patients participate in cardiac rehabilitation
Only about 24% of Medicare patients who could receive outpatient cardiac rehabilitation participate in the program. (2020-01-14)
Significant underreporting in safety data found on Nursing Home Compare website
The website Nursing Home Compare, is a go-to resource for many families researching nursing home options for their loved ones, however, a University of Chicago researcher has found that the data used by Nursing Home Compare to report patient safety related to falls may be highly inaccurate. (2020-01-07)
Affordable Care Act led to fewer disruptions in care
Among low-income adults enrolled in Medicaid, disruptions in coverage, or churning, decreased following the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (2020-01-07)
Ratings system may penalize hospitals serving vulnerable communities
Analysis of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare rating system shows that hospitals serving vulnerable communities may be judged on social factors outside of their control. (2020-01-07)
Patients with VA coverage less likely than other insured Americans to skip medication
Veterans' Administration patients were less likely than other insured Americans to skip medications due to cost. (2020-01-06)
Health care paperwork cost US $812 billion in 2017, 4 times more per capita than Canada
Compared to Canada, the US spends four times more on health care administration ($551 vs. (2020-01-06)
Extending Medicare Part D rebates to beneficiaries would save seniors $29 billion over 7 years
A new assessment of the Medicare Part D program based on a proposal from the West Health Policy Center finds that Medicare beneficiaries would save $29 billion if drug manufacturer rebates were used to reduce their out-of-pocket costs at the pharmacy counter through the Part D benefit -- as long as these rebate savings are not also used to reduce Part D manufacturer liability. (2019-12-19)
Breast cancer patients with government insurance at higher risk of death
A retrospective study of 9800 women with breast cancer who participated in randomized clinical trials found that Medicaid/Medicare patients were less likely to participate in a clinical trial compared to their privately insured counterparts. (2019-12-13)
Lyme disease claim lines increased 117% from 2007 to 2018
From 2007 to 2018, claim lines with diagnoses of Lyme disease increased nationally 117%. (2019-12-10)
Older adults who 'train' for a major operation spend less time in the hospital
Older adults who 'train' for a major operation by exercising, eating a healthy diet, and practicing stress reduction techniques preoperatively have shorter hospital stays and are more likely to return to their own homes afterward rather than another facility, compared with similar patients who do not participate in preoperative rehabilitation, according to research findings. (2019-12-05)
Trends in Alzheimer's disease diagnoses across the United States
A recent analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society offers estimates of the changes in incidence of Alzheimer's disease in the United States, confirming previous reports of a declining trend. (2019-12-04)
Lack of specialists doom rural sick patients
Residents of rural areas are more likely to be hospitalized and to die than those who live in cities primarily because they lack access to specialists, according to research in Health Affairs. (2019-12-03)
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