Nav: Home

Current Medicare News and Events

Current Medicare News and Events, Medicare News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Open Medicare data helps uncover potential hidden costs of health care
Indiana University scientists have found an association between health care industry payments to medical providers for non-research expenses and what these providers charge for medical services -- shedding new light on potential hidden costs to the public. (2019-09-20)
Latest issue of Alzheimer's & Dementia
Predicting heart disease might also be a warning sign for Alzheimer's; A new way to think about the environment and Alzheimer's research; Most dementia patients don't receive care from physicians who specialize in brain health. (2019-09-19)
Nonphysician providers rarely interpret diagnostic imaging -- except radiography, fluoroscopy
Although Medicare claims data confirm the increasing role of nonphysician providers in imaging-guided procedures across the United States, according to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, nurse practitioners and physician assistants still rarely render diagnostic imaging services, compared with the overall number of diagnostic imaging interpretations. (2019-09-13)
370 healthcare groups send letter to congress urging prior authorization reform in medicare advantage
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR), along with 369 other leading patient, physician, and healthcare professional organizations, sent a letter to Congress urging passage of the Improving Seniors' Timely Access to Care Act of 2019 (H.R. (2019-09-11)
Racial/ethnic differences in emergency department destination of EMS for patients living in same area
Black and Hispanic Medicare patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS) to an emergency department (ED) were less likely to go to the same ED as white Medicare patients living in the same area. (2019-09-06)
Study links hearing aids to lower risk of dementia, depression and falls
Older adults who get a hearing aid for a newly diagnosed hearing loss have a lower risk of being diagnosed with dementia, depression or anxiety for the first time over the next three years, and a lower risk of suffering fall-related injuries, than those who leave their hearing loss uncorrected, a new study finds. (2019-09-05)
Negotiation: A three-step solution to affordable prescription drugs
Criteria are offered by Harvard University and George Mason University experts for Medicare to negotiate drug prices and prioritize specific drugs for maximum savings. (2019-09-04)
Bigger spend, same end: Post-hospital care study suggests ways to save Medicare money
A new study reveals that spending on post-hospital care for patients who have traditional Medicare coverage costs much more than it does for an identical patient with private insurance. (2019-09-03)
Elderly have poor prognosis after recovery in long-term acute care hospitals
While long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) are designed to help patients recover and regain independence, fewer than one in five older adults who were transferred to such facilities were alive five years later, leaving them with a worse prognosis than terminal illnesses such as advanced cancer, according to research at UC San Francisco and The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. (2019-08-26)
Medicare patients with multiple sclerosis bear the burden of rising drug prices
In a decade, Medicare recipients saw a sevenfold increase in out of pocket costs for multiple sclerosis drugs. (2019-08-26)
Hospital ratings systems get low grades from experts
Experts have turned the tables on hospital rating systems and graded the rating systems on their strengths and weaknesses. (2019-08-14)
Restructuring Medicare Shared Savings Program can yield 40% savings in health costs
More than a trillion dollars was spent on healthcare in the United States in 2018, with Medicare and Medicaid accounting for some 37% of those expenditures. (2019-08-08)
Most independent charity drug assistance programs exclude the uninsured
A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health examined independent charity prescription drug assistance programs in the U.S. and found that nearly all--97 percent--did not provide coverage for uninsured patients. (2019-08-06)
Industry payments to physician director of NCI-designated cancer centers
Data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services were used to examine industry payments to physician directors of National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers in this research letter. (2019-08-05)
Use of non-hospital-based provider-to-patient telehealth grew nearly 1,400%
From 2014 to 2018, private insurance claim lines for non-hospital-based provider-to-patient telehealth grew 1,393 %, according to a new white paper on telehealth from FAIR Health, a national, independent nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing transparency to healthcare costs and health insurance information. (2019-07-22)
Critical heart drug too pricey for some Medicare patients
An effective drug to treat chronic heart failure may cost too much for senior citizens with a standard Medicare Part D drug plan, said a study co-authored by a John A. (2019-07-22)
Medicare for All unlikely to cause surge in hospital use: Harvard study
Despite some analysts' claims that Medicare for All would cause a sharp increase in health care utilization, a new study finds the two biggest coverage expansions in US history -- Medicare and the ACA -- caused no net increase in hospital use. (2019-07-22)
New research finds private practice physicians less likely to maintain electronic records
The research led by Jordan Everson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), finds striking differences in use of electronic health records (EHRs) among more than 291,000 physicians included in the study. (2019-07-19)
Dartmouth study examines association between care management and outcomes in Medicare ACOs
New research from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice finds that Accountable Care Organization (ACO)-reported care management and coordination activities were not associated with improved outcomes or lower spending for patients with complex needs. (2019-07-12)
Study finds ACOs need a balance of PCPs and specialists to best reduce health care costs
Accountable care organizations (ACOs), the health care delivery model created by the Affordable Care Act in an effort to reduce Medicare costs while improving coordination and quality of care, typically rely on primary care providers (PCPs) to steer the boat. (2019-07-10)
More money, more gabapentin
Pharmaceutical companies' payments to doctors may be influencing them to prescribe more expensive, brand-name versions of the pain drug gabapentin, a team of researchers report in the July 8, 2019 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, and the increasing use of the drug suggests it may be being abused.  (2019-07-08)
Hormone therapy for prostate cancer may raise risk of Alzheimer's, Dementia
A Penn study of more than 150,000 men with prostate cancer shows androgen deprivation therapy was associated with a higher likelihood of developing dementia when compared to patients who were not exposed to the treatment. (2019-07-08)
An effort to stop the revolving door for hospital patients may be spinning its wheels
A new study shows that after several years of rapid improvements in hospital readmissions, the federal readmission penalty program may be spinning its wheels more than it's slowing the spinning of the revolving hospital door. (2019-07-01)
Study shows some generics can cost medicare recipients more than brand-name drugs
Medicare Part D enrollees may pay more out of pocket for high-priced specialty generic drugs than their brand-name counterparts, according to new research by health policy experts at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (2019-07-01)
New data resource reveals highly variable staffing at nursing homes
Researchers who analyzed payroll-based staffing data for US nursing homes discovered large daily staffing fluctuations, low weekend staffing and daily staffing levels that often fall well below the expectations of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), all of which can increase the risk of adverse events for residents. (2019-07-01)
More women in US receive 3D mammography but disparities remain
Use of 3D mammography, an advanced form of breast cancer screening, has risen rapidly in recent years, according to Yale researchers in a new study. (2019-06-24)
One-fifth of US surgeons still overusing riskier procedure to create kidney dialysis access
Long-term hemodialysis is a lifesaver for approximately half a million patients in the United States with kidney failure (also known as end-stage renal disease, or ESRD) who are either waiting on or unsuitable for a kidney transplant. (2019-06-13)
Costs of care similar or lower at teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals
Total costs of care are similar or somewhat lower among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals among Medicare beneficiaries treated for common medical and surgical conditions, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. (2019-06-07)
Should STEMI patients recover in the ICU?
Providers need more clear guidance on whether a patient who has suffered from STEMI heart attack should recover in the intensive care unit, a new University of Michigan study, published in The BMJ, finds. (2019-06-04)
New study evaluates transcatheter dialysis conduit procedures over 15 years
A new research study by Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute found that utilization of invasive procedures on hemodialysis conduits -- artificially constructed shuts used by many individuals who require dialysis -- increased markedly from 2001 through 2015 for nephrologists and declined for radiologists. (2019-05-29)
Medicare spending higher among older adults with disabilities who lack adequate support
A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that more than one in five older adults who were aging in place with a mobility or self-care disability reported experiencing negative consequences such as having to stay in bed or going without eating due to no one being available to help or the activity being too difficult to perform alone. (2019-05-28)
Does fracture risk differ between 2 common types of weight-loss surgery?
This study used Medicare claims data to compare risk of fracture among about 42,000 patients who had weight-loss surgery. (2019-05-15)
Rates of long-term opiate use rises in Medicare cancer survivors each year after diagnosis
Using Medicare data, new findings from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston show for the first time that the rates of long term opiate therapy for older cancer survivors remain high for at least five years in cancer survivors. (2019-05-14)
Does health care help us live longer?
A widely cited statistic suggests that health care services account for only a small percentage of the variation in American life expectancy. (2019-05-14)
For-profit dialysis provider charges private insurers 4 times more than government payers
Private insurers covering people receiving treatment for dialysis paid four times more than government insurance programs such as Medicare paid for the same service. (2019-05-14)
Private health plans pay hospitals 2.4 times what Medicare would pay
Hospital costs account for nearly half of all personal health spending for the privately insured, but relatively is known about how much more the privately insured pay hospitals relative to Medicare patients. (2019-05-09)
Nurse care coordinators are key to success of patient-centered medical home programs
In a new study, George Mason University faculty researchers assessed primary care provider experiences with the CareFirst Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) program. (2019-05-09)
Patients insured by marketplace health plan less likely to receive a medical appointment
Among adults with mental health needs, those covered by Medicare or employer-sponsored health insurance have greater access to medical treatment, less out-of-pocket cost and are more likely to receive care than those seeking an appointment through an Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplace-sponsored plan, according to findings from researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2019-05-07)
Patients of medicare providers committing fraud, abuse more likely to be poor, disabled
A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health analyzed providers excluded from Medicare for fraud and abuse, and found that the patients they treated prior to being banned were more likely to be minorities, disabled and dually-enrolled in Medicaid to supplement financial assistance for health care. (2019-05-07)
External reference drug pricing could save Medicare tens of billions
A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that prices for brand-name prescription drugs averaged 3.2 to 4.1 times higher in the US when compared with prices in the United Kingdom, Japan and the Canadian province of Ontario. (2019-05-06)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...