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Current Medication News and Events

Current Medication News and Events, Medication News Articles.
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Cannabis treatment counters addiction: First study of its kind
An Australian study has demonstrated that cannabis-based medication helps tackle dependency on cannabis, one of the most widely used drugs globally. (2019-07-15)
Redesign of opioid medication management shows impact in rural clinics
In rural practice, a system redesign resulted in declines in the proportion of patients on high dose opioids and the number of patients receiving opioids. (2019-07-10)
Symptom-triggered medication for neonatal opioid withdrawal yields shorter hospital stays
A study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center (BMC) found that symptom-triggered medication dosing for neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome instead of infants receiving a fixed schedule of medication with a long taper reduced the length of their hospital stay. (2019-07-09)
BU researchers: Allowing the sale of buprenorphine without a prescription could save lives
In an effort to address the opioid epidemic in new, safe and effective ways, increasing access to buprenorphine, without a prescription, could prove helpful for treating persons with opioid use disorder (OUD), according to a Viewpoint in this week's JAMA. (2019-07-08)
Hospitals address opioid crisis via stewardship with strong pharmacist involvement
A survey of health-system pharmacy directors released today found that most large health systems have active stewardship programs to prevent the misuse of opioids -- with pharmacists playing a key role. (2019-07-03)
Many grandparents' medicines not secure enough around grandchildren, poll suggests
Whether it's a rare treat or a weekly routine, many older adults enjoy spending time with grandchildren. (2019-07-01)
Migraine increases the risk of complications during pregnancy and childbirth
Pregnant women with migraine have an increased risk of miscarriage, caesarean sections and giving birth to a child with low birth weight. (2019-06-26)
Common antidepressants interact with opioid med to lessen pain relief
Common antidepressants interact with the opioid pain medication tramadol to make it less effective for pain relief, according to a study published in the journal Pharmacotherapy. (2019-06-25)
Commonly prescribed drugs could increase the risk of dementia, says a new study
New research suggests that regular use of certain types of commonly prescribed drugs used to treat bladder conditions, Parkinson's disease and depression, could significantly increase the risk of dementia in later life. (2019-06-24)
EHR medication lists lack accuracy, may threaten patient safety
Almost 1 in 4 medications were mismatched between the clinician's notes and the formal medication list in a patient's electronic medical record, according to study of ophthalmic medications by Kellogg Eye Center. (2019-06-20)
Implanted drug 'reservoir' safely reduces injections for people with macular degeneration
In a clinical trial of 220 people with 'wet' age-related macular degeneration, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, collaborators from many sites across the country, and Genentech in South San Francisco have added to evidence that using a new implant technology that continuously delivers medication into the eyes is safe and effective in helping maintain vision and reduces the need for injections in the eyes. (2019-06-13)
Parents of depressed teens in treatment may also benefit from counseling
Parents often seek mental health treatment for a child struggling with depression, but the treatment shouldn't stop with the depressed teen, suggests a new Northwestern Medicine study. (2019-06-06)
Alzheimer's therapy may help overcome opioid addiction
Clinical trial results reveal that a medication used to treat Alzheimer's disease may also be an effective therapy for individuals addicted to opioids. (2019-06-05)
Study examines potential misuse of anti-anxiety medication
There is concern about the misuse of the sedative anti-anxiety medication alprazolam (Xanax) because of the 'high' it can create. (2019-06-05)
Beta blockers reduce stress-induced irregular heart rhythm
Taking beta blockers -- medications that reduce blood pressure and treat many heart conditions -- can blunt the negative effects of stress and anger on people with a history of atrial fibrillation, or irregular heart rhythm, said Yale researchers. (2019-06-04)
For Latinos with diabetes, new study looks at ways to improve medication adherence
A new study shows certain lifestyle changes and low-cost interventions may improve how Latino patients with diabetes manage their medication regimen. (2019-06-04)
Doctors can estimate patient adherence by simply asking about medication routine
Doctors know patients do not always take their medications as prescribed. (2019-05-21)
'Stepped' treatment reduces drinking in patients with HIV
People with HIV who drink too much were more likely to reduce drinking after undergoing an approach to care known as integrated stepped alcohol treatment, according to a Yale-led study. (2019-05-17)
Weight loss medicines underutilized by veterans
Despite the availability of new weight management medications and several clinical guidelines recommending their use as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for obesity, a new study has found that their use is extremely low (about one percent) among eligible Veterans. (2019-05-15)
Bullying linked to student's pain medication use
In a school-based survey study of all students in grades 6, 8, and 10 in Iceland, the use of pain medications was significantly higher among bullied students even when controlling for the amount of pain they felt, as well as age, gender, and socioeconomic status. (2019-05-09)
Study: Health care providers split on who should prescribe HIV prevention drug
UB researchers interviewed a small sample of PrEP-prescribing providers in New York State to conduct a qualitative analysis of their perspectives on the preventive medication. (2019-04-30)
Eat, sleep and console tool decreases length of stay and post natal use of opiates
A new quality improvement tool called Eat, Sleep and Console shows consistent signs of improved care of opioid-exposed newborns in neonatal intensive care units. (2019-04-27)
Doctors turning to antibiotic alternatives to treat acne, Rutgers researchers find
Physicians are scaling back on prescribing antibiotics for long-term acne treatment in favor of a combinations of therapies, according to Rutgers researchers. (2019-04-24)
Texting to improve health outcomes for people with schizophrenia
Texting patients with schizophrenia and their lay health supporters in a resource-poor community setting is more effective than a free-medicine program alone in improving medication adherence and reducing relapses and re-hospitalizations, according to a study published April 23 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Wenjie Gong of Central South University in Hunan, China, Dong (Roman) Xu of Sun Yat-sen University Global Health Institute, Guangdong, China and colleagues. (2019-04-23)
People with heart disease at risk when pharmacies close
New research shows that when pharmacies close, people stop taking widely used heart medications -- like statins, beta-blockers and oral anticoagulants -- that have known cardiovascular and survival benefits. (2019-04-19)
Technology automatically senses how Parkinson's patients respond to medication
Adjusting the frequency and dosage of Parkinson's patients' medication is complex. (2019-04-17)
Critical errors in inhaler technique common in children with asthma
In the first study to evaluate inhaler technique in children hospitalized for asthma -- the group at highest risk for complications and death from asthma -- researchers found that nearly half of participants demonstrated improper inhaler use, which means they routinely were not taking in the full dose of medication. (2019-04-17)
Study: Medication treatment reduces arrests among people with opioid use disorder
When it comes to addressing the national opioid crisis, most of the research has focused on the physical health risks faced by people with opioid use disorder, such as overdose and infectious disease. (2019-04-09)
The screen interval for high cardiovascular disease risk should be individual
According to a study published today by a Finnish-English research group, a switch from 5-yearly screen intervals to individualized intervals could annually prevent 8 percent of myocardial infarcts and strokes without increasing health care costs. (2019-04-03)
Childhood methylphenidate treatment predicts antidepressant use during adolescence
A new, 12-year longitudinal study, which monitored 6,830 children from early childhood into adolescence, has shown that consistent treatment with MPH-based medications during childhood increases the risk of antidepressant use during adolescence. (2019-03-27)
Solving a hairy forensic problem
For decades, forensic scientists have tested strands of hair to reveal drug use or poisoning. (2019-03-27)
Drug shortages: Limited warnings, followed by rationing and hoarding
In a national survey, hospital pharmacy managers report a lack of advance notice, frequent drug shortages, hoarding and even rationing. (2019-03-27)
Review of osteoporosis clinical practice guidelines finds majority lack patient values
Patients' voices are ignored all too often in osteoporosis clinical practice guidelines, say researchers, who reviewed 70 English-language guidelines around the world and found less than 40 percent included any mention of patients' beliefs, values or preferences (BVPs). (2019-03-20)
Gene medication to help treat spinal cord injuries
The two-gene medication has been proven to recover motor functions in rats. (2019-03-18)
Taking statins for heart disease cuts risk in half, yet only 6 percent of patients taking as directed
Study finds that taking statins for heart disease cuts risk of second serious event in half, yet only 6 percent of patients are following as directed. (2019-03-16)
Interdisciplinary education helps hospital patients better understand their medications
Patients understanding their medications and taking them as instructed are important parts of improving the care and outcomes of heart attack patients, as well as potentially reducing avoidable readmissions, according to research presented at the ACC Quality Summit in New Orleans. (2019-03-13)
Inactive ingredients in pills and capsules may cause allergic, adverse reactions
The majority of oral medications available to consumers contain ingredients that can affect sensitive individuals. (2019-03-13)
'Inactive' ingredients may not be, study finds
MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital researchers have found that nearly all pills and capsules contain some inactive ingredients that can cause allergic reactions or food intolerances in certain patients. (2019-03-13)
SGLT-2 inhibitors work by inducing a fasting state that triggers metabolic benefits
This research shows how SGLT-2 inhibitors induce a fasting state that triggers many metabolic benefits, including lowering of blood glucose, weight loss, a reduction of fat accumulation in the liver and reduced body fat. (2019-03-07)
Over half of ED visits for nonmedical prescription drug use are patients under 35
Using nationally representative public health surveillance data to characterize US ED visits for harm caused by nonmedical prescription drug use, investigators at CDC and FDA report in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine that over half these visits are by young adults under 35, and over 40 percent of patients arrive unconscious or after cardiorespiratory failure. (2019-03-06)
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