Current Medication News and Events

Current Medication News and Events, Medication News Articles.
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Nurse practitioners play key role in opioid addiction treatment in very rural areas
Giving nurse practitioners the authority to prescribe buprenorphine has brought that gold standard treatment for opioid addiction to people who might not have had access to it before, according to a new study. Looking at prescription drug monitoring data in Oregon before and after 2017, when nurse practitioners and physician assistants gained the authority to prescribe buprenorphine, researchers found that nurse practitioners almost immediately had an impact on access to buprenorphine in rural Oregon. (2020-11-23)

The danger of Z-drugs for dementia patients
Strong sleeping pills known as 'Z-drugs' are linked with an increased risk of falls, fractures and stroke among people with dementia, according to new research. Sleep disturbance is common among people with dementia and the impact for patients and their families is significant. To date there are no proven effective treatments available, however people with dementia are often prescribed Z-drugs (zopiclone, zaleplon, and zolpidem). The new study reveals that stronger doses of these drugs are linked with an increased risk of adverse effects. (2020-11-23)

Long-acting antipsychotic therapy plus cognitive training show promise for schizophrenia
UCLA scientists and colleagues found the use of long-acting antipsychotic medication combined with the use of cognitive training in group settings led to improved cognition and increased productivity. (2020-11-19)

Diagnosing the cause of exercise-induced respiratory symptoms
Exercise?induced respiratory symptoms are common in childhood, and it can be difficult to diagnose their cause. A study published in Pediatric Pulmonology found that the diagnoses proposed by primary care physicians are often not the same as the final diagnoses after specialist referrals. (2020-11-18)

Artificial intelligence-based tool may help diagnose opioid addiction earlier
Researchers have used machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence, to develop a prediction model for the early diagnosis of opioid use disorder. The advance is described in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives. (2020-11-18)

A change of heart -- new drug for HCM reduces heart mass
For the first time, a medication has impacted heart muscle thickness and function for patients with the most common inherited heart condition, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rather than simply addressing their symptoms. (2020-11-16)

STRENGTH trial finds new fish oil medication did not reduce the risk of cardiac events
A medication derived from fish oil, containing the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, was evaluated in a large, international study of more than 13,000 people who had existing heart disease or who were at high risk of heart disease due to other medical conditions. The medication did not reduce the risk of cardiac events compared to a corn oil-based placebo in the STRENGTH trial. (2020-11-15)

Romosozumab substantially builds bone density in hip and spine
New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College Rheumatology's annual meeting, reveals that romosozumab, an osteoporosis drug, produces substantial gains in bone mineral density in the hip and lumbar spine within one year, and that transitioning patients to a potent antiresorptive drug can lead to even more bone density gains. (2020-11-06)

Learning disorders and Parkinson's disease: tremor predicts effects of medication
The effect of dopaminergic medication on the learning abilities of patients with Parkinson's disease turns out to be linked to the presence of tremor symptoms. In patients who do not experience tremor, dopaminergic medication improves the ability to learn from rewards (reinforcement learning). Remarkably, the medication brings no benefit in reward learning to patients who do exhibit tremor. (2020-11-05)

New study reveals poisoning exposures in Australian schools
New research from the University of Sydney has found poisoning exposures in children and adolescents while at school are relatively common and appear to be increasing, highlighting the need for more robust prevention measures. (2020-11-02)

Study: 34% of older adults in the US are prescribed potentially inappropriate drugs
The prescription of potentially inappropriate medications to older adults is linked to increased hospitalizations, and it costs patients, on average, more than $450 per year, according to a new University at Buffalo study. (2020-10-23)

Drug repurposing
University of New Mexico researchers identify three existing drugs with the potential to clear SARS-CoV-2 infections. (2020-10-16)

Pharmacist-led digital intervention reduces hazardous prescribing in general practice
A pharmacist-led, new digital intervention that improves patient safety when prescribing medication in general practice reduced rates of hazardous prescribing by more than 40* per cent, 12 months after it had been introduced to 43 GP practices in Salford, finds a new study. Due to its success, plans are underway to roll it out across Greater Manchester. (2020-10-14)

Therapy plus medication better than medication alone in bipolar disorder
A review of 39 randomized clinical trials by scientists from UCLA and their colleagues from other institutions has found that combining the use medication with psychoeducational therapy is more effective at preventing a recurrence of illness in people with bipolar disorder than medication alone. (2020-10-14)

Ten or more medications, often prescribed to older heart failure patients, raises concerns
More than half of older patients hospitalized for heart failure are discharged with 10 or more prescriptions, and most are not medications to treat heart failure or other cardiovascular conditions. This is important because older patients with heart failure taking 10 or more medications may be at risk for harm related to high medication burden. Regular medication review at each appointment is key to tailoring decisions for each patient while considering their overall health status. (2020-10-13)

Proactive steps linked to reduced medical costs, hospital visits for children with asthma
A new study looking at data from tens of thousands of children with asthma finds that several widely available interventions are associated with both reduced medical costs and a reduced likelihood that the children will need to visit an emergency room or stay in the hospital. (2020-10-12)

Clashing medications put older adults at risk but many haven't had a pharmacist check them
Two-thirds of older adults rely on at least two prescription drugs, and many take over-the-counter medicines and supplements as well. Some of those pills, capsules and tablets may interact with one another in ways that could put them at risk. But a new poll shows that most people over 50 haven't connected with a pharmacist to check for potential clashes among all the things they take, or the potential to save money on them. (2020-10-07)

Awakening after a sleeping pill
A patient who could not move and talk spontaneously for eight years started to do so again after being administered a sleeping pill. The spectacular but temporary effect was visualized with brain scans, giving researchers from Radboud university medical center and Amsterdam UMC a better understanding of this disorder's underlying neurophysiological processes. The article has been published in Cortex. (2020-10-02)

Medicine for multiple sclerosis patients inhibits coronavirus - at least in a test tube
A drug which has already been approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis patients effectively inhibits the coronavirus when tested on human lung cells. This is shown by a newly published study from biomedicine researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark. (2020-10-02)

Study links low immunity to poor outcomes in patients with HIV who contract COVID-19
Clinical trials are testing whether medications that treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can also treat COVID-19, leading some patients with HIV to believe they might be protected against the coronavirus. But a researcher from the MU School of Medicine not only found patients with HIV are susceptible to the virus, she also discovered which factors increased the risk of hospitalization and death. (2020-09-30)

Don't sleep on the hypnotic potential of thalidomide
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel molecular pathway for the hypnotic effects of thalidomide. By comparing the effects of thalidomide on the sleep of normal mice and mice in which the protein cereblon was resistant to thalidomide, the researchers found that thalidomide acted independently of cereblon but similarly to general anesthetics and sedatives to induce sleep. These findings could help develop thalidomide-like hypnotic drugs without its teratogenic effects. (2020-09-23)

Metformin treatment linked to slowed cognitive decline
A six-year study of older Australians with type 2 diabetes has uncovered a link between metformin use, slower cognitive decline and lower dementia rates. (2020-09-23)

Soft robots, origami combine for potential way to deliver medical treatments
Researchers have found a way to send tiny, soft robots into humans, potentially opening the door for less invasive surgeries and ways to deliver treatments for conditions ranging from colon polyps to stomach cancer to aortic artery blockages. (2020-09-21)

The impact of COVID-19 on access to Parkinson's disease medication
A global survey of health professionals has shown that during the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with Parkinson's disease in large parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin and South America experienced difficulty in accessing their medication, which is likely to have led to deterioration of symptom control. (2020-09-21)

Study shows the major impact of diabetes on the risk of falls
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year (21-25 September), shows that having type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with a 33% increase in the risk of falls compared with the general population, while having type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with a 19% increased risk of falls. (2020-09-20)

Many practitioners are not prescribing HIV prevention medication, study finds
Only about 54% of medical practitioners surveyed say they have prescribed pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, to HIV-vulnerable patients, according to a new study by a Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigator. (2020-09-17)

One in 10 older dental patients inappropriately prescribed opioids
A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that a significant proportion of older patients receiving opioids at dental visits also use psychotropic medications -- a potentially harmful combination. Their findings are published in the journal Pharmacotherapy. (2020-09-16)

TV ads for psoriasis and eczema medications portray few people of color
Commercials from pharmaceutical companies advertising medication to treat psoriasis and eczema lack people from racial and ethnic minorities, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (2020-09-15)

Henry ford study finds certain immuno suppressing drugs do not increase risk for COVID-19
Patients on immunosuppressive therapy for common skin and rheumatic diseases like psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis are not at increased risk for contracting COVID-19 and should continue taking their medicine as prescribed, say Henry Ford Health System dermatology researchers in a study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. (2020-09-14)

The pharmacist's role in HIV care in France
In France, antiretroviral treatment (ARV) can be dispensed by hospitals and/or community pharmacies. A recent study published in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives examined the pharmacist's role in HIV care in this country. (2020-09-10)

'One size fits all' medication approach doesn't work in pregnancy
New research led by the University of South Australia shows that a blanket approach to prescribing medication during pregnancy may put low birth weight babies at risk for the rest of their lives. (2020-09-08)

Children with asthma could benefit from prescribing according to genetic differences
Selecting treatments according to genetic differences could help children and teenagers with asthma, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. The trial, which compares patients treated according to small genetic differences with patients treated according to existing guidelines, is the first of its kind in children and teenagers. (2020-09-07)

Texas A&M researchers develop treatment for canine ocular condition using turmeric
Researchers at Texas A&M University have produced a therapeutic derived from turmeric, a spice long-praised for its natural anti-inflammatory properties, that shows promise in decreasing ocular inflammation in dogs suffering from uveitis, an inflammation of the eye that leads to pain and reduced vision. (2020-09-03)

Blood pressure-lowering is even more beneficial than previously thought
Blood pressure medication can prevent heart attacks and strokes - even in people with normal blood pressure. That's the finding of late breaking research presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020.1 ''Greater drops in blood pressure with medication lead to greater reductions in the risk of heart attacks and strokes,'' said principal investigator Professor Kazem Rahimi of the University of Oxford, UK. (2020-09-01)

Large study finds no link between blood pressure medication and cancer
There is no evidence that blood pressure lowering drugs increase the risk of cancer, according to the most extensive study conducted on the topic. The late breaking research is presented today at ESC Congress 2020. (2020-08-31)

Prior health insurance coverage disruptions linked to issues with healthcare access
A new American Cancer Society study finds health insurance coverage disruptions in the prior year led to issues with healthcare access and affordability for currently insured cancer survivors. The study appears in the Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2020-08-31)

How to treat high blood pressure without ruining your sex life
Men with untreated high blood pressure have poorer penile blood flow than those with normal blood pressure, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2020.1 The differences disappeared with blood pressure medication. The results provide reassurance to men concerned about the effects of blood pressure-lowering medications. (2020-08-28)

The patients left behind by HIV research
People from BAME communities, women and heterosexual men are being left behind by HIV research. Medication to manage HIV is effective at keeping people well. But over half of people with HIV do not take their medication correctly. New research shows that the problem could be in the way studies are designed - with BAME communities, women and straight men under-represented. The researchers say this imbalance must be fixed, to keep a diverse population of HIV patients living longer, healthier lives. (2020-08-26)

Treatment for teen anxiety
In a new National Institute of Mental Health-funded study, led by Jeffrey Strawn and published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, UC researchers took a first look at one particular medication for treatment of anxiety disorders in pediatric patients to see if it was beneficial. (2020-08-25)

Mail delays may affect medication supply for nearly 1 in 4 Americans over 50
The timeliness of mail delivery may affect access to medication for many middle-aged and older adults, according to a new analysis of data from a national poll of people aged 50 to 80. Nearly one in four people in this age group said they receive at least one medication by mail, but that percentage rises to 29% when the poll results are limited to people who take at least one prescription medication. (2020-08-24)

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