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Remember that fake news you read? It may help you remember even more
Thinking back on a time you encountered false information or ''fake news'' may prime your brain to better recall truthful memories. (2020-10-16)
Astrocytes build synapses after cocaine use in mice
Drugs of abuse, like cocaine, are so addictive due in part to their cellular interaction, creating strong cellular memories in the brain that promote compulsive behaviors. (2020-10-15)
Remembering novelty
The brain and its functions still pose many open questions. (2020-10-15)
Scientists unpack how the brain separates present from past dangers
A team of neuroscientists has identified processes the brain undergoes to distinguish real and present dangers from those linked to past experiences in mice. (2020-10-07)
Discovery of a new key player in long-term memory
A McGill-led multi-institutional research team has discovered that during memory consolidation, there are at least two distinct processes taking place in two different brain networks - the excitatory and inhibitory networks. (2020-10-07)
Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form
Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study. (2020-10-05)
Why writing by hand makes kids smarter
New brain research shows that writing by hand helps children learn more and remember better. (2020-10-01)
Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known ''happy hormones'', and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with. (2020-09-22)
Scientists "scent train" honeybees to boost sunflowers' seed production
If you want a dog to hunt something down, it helps to let them sniff an item to pick up the scent. (2020-09-17)
Scientists discover what happens in our brains when we make educated guesses
Researchers have identified how cells in our brains work together to join up memories of separate experiences, allowing us to make educated guesses in everyday life. (2020-09-17)
The brain's memory abilities inspire AI experts in making neural networks less 'forgetful'
Artificial intelligence (AI) experts at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the Baylor College of Medicine report that they have successfully addressed what they call a ''major, long-standing obstacle to increasing AI capabilities'' by drawing inspiration from a human brain memory mechanism known as ''replay.'' (2020-09-17)
Research unravels what makes memories so detailed and enduring
In years to come, our personal memories of the COVID-19 pandemic are likely to be etched in our minds with precision and clarity, distinct from other memories of 2020. (2020-09-08)
Unlocking the mysteries of the brain
A research team highlights the mechanisms underlying memory and learning capacity -- specifically, how our brains process, store and integrate information. (2020-08-26)
Recalling memories from a third-person perspective changes how our brain processes them
Adopting a third-person, observer point of view when recalling your past activates different parts of your brain than recalling a memory seen through your own eyes, according to a new paper. (2020-08-13)
Can sleep protect us from forgetting old memories?
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that sleep may help people to learn continuously through their lifetime by encoding new memories and protecting old ones. (2020-08-04)
Transcranial stimulation to prevent fear memories from returning
A research group at the University of Bologna developed a new non-invasive experimental protocol to alter the memory of learned fear experiences, thus paving the way for treatments to overcome traumatic events (2020-07-30)
Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-07-27)
A survey on optical memory and optical RAM technologies
The ability to store with light and built promising optical memories has been an intriguing research topic for more than two decades. (2020-07-21)
Study shows how our brains remain active during familiar, repetitive tasks
New research, based on earlier results in mice, suggests that our brains are never at rest, even when we are not learning anything about the world around us. (2020-07-14)
Why are memories attached to emotions so strong?
Multiple neurons in the brain must fire in synchrony to create persistent memories tied to intense emotions, new research from Columbia neuroscientists has found. (2020-07-13)
Robust high-performance data storage through magnetic anisotropy
A technologically relevant material for HAMR data memories are thin films of iron-platinum nanograins. (2020-07-10)
Desert island discs: Music listened to in younger years defines us forever, research finds
Researchers at the University of Westminster and City University of London analysing the music record choices of guests on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs programme has found that the music we listen to between the age of 10 and 30 define us for the rest of our lives. (2020-07-09)
NIH study finds out why some words may be more memorable than others
In a recent study of epilepsy patients and healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers found that our brains may withdraw some common words, like ''pig,'' ''tank,'' and ''door,'' much more often than others, including ''cat,'' ''street,'' and ''stair.'' By combining memory tests, brain wave recordings, and surveys of billions of words published in books, news articles and internet encyclopedia pages, the researchers not only showed how our brains may recall words but also memories of our past experiences. (2020-06-29)
Older adults share fewer memories as they age
Researchers used a smartphone app to 'eavesdrop' on older adult conversations. (2020-06-29)
'Where are my keys?' and other memory-based choices probed in the brain
Researchers from Caltech and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center visualize how memories are selectively retrieved in the brain. (2020-06-25)
UTEP researchers uncover brain mechanisms in fruit flies that may impact future learning
A research team from The University of Texas at El Paso has made strides in understanding how memories are formed through the brain mechanisms of fruit flies. (2020-06-23)
Being 'mind-blind' may make remembering, dreaming and imagining harder, study finds
Aphantasia - being blind in the mind's eye - may be linked to more cognitive functions than previously thought, new research from UNSW Sydney shows. (2020-06-22)
A fair reward ensures a good memory
By deciphering the neural dialogue between the brain's reward and memory networks, a new study demonstrates that the lasting positive effect of a reward on the ability of individuals to retain a variety of information. (2020-06-17)
A new study on rare 'split brain' patients sheds light on feature of human sleep
A new study of researchers at IMT School for Advanced Study Lucca demonstrates for the first time that the slow waves of NREM-sleep travel and propagate in the brain through ''anatomical highways''. (2020-06-17)
FSU researchers uncover new insights into Alzheimer's disease
FSU researchers looking at mouse models found impaired functional interactions between the hippocampus and the parietal cortex during the memory replay period, which may yield new insights into Alzheimer's Disease. (2020-06-17)
Clues to ageing come to light in vivid snapshots of brain cell links
Striking images of some five billion brain cell connections have been created by scientists, mapping a lifetime's changes across the brain in minute detail. (2020-06-11)
Alzheimer research: Noise-inducing neurons shut down memories
Neurons that are responsible for new experiences interfere with the signals of neurons that contain memories and thereby disturb the recall of memories - at least in mice. (2020-06-09)
Dreaming with purpose
Researchers from University of Tsukuba and the University of Tokyo have found that activity in adult-born neurons (ABNs) in the hippocampus, which is a brain region associated with memory, are responsible for memory consolidation during REM sleep. (2020-06-05)
Adult neurogenesis essential for sleep-induced memory consolidation in mice
Adult neurogenesis, in which new neurons are generated within the hippocampus in the fully developed adult brain, occurs in mice -- but how new neurons are functionally integrated into existing brain circuitry has remained largely unknown. (2020-06-04)
Graphene and 2D materials could move electronics beyond 'Moore's Law'
A team of researchers based in Manchester, the Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland and the USA has published a new review on a field of computer device development known as spintronics, which could see graphene used as building block for next-generation electronics. (2020-06-03)
Your brain needs to be ready to remember?
What happens in the hippocampus even before people attempt to form memories may impact whether they remember. (2020-06-01)
Brain's 'updating mechanisms' may create false memories
The research, published in Current Biology, is one of the first comprehensive characterizations of poorly formed memories and may offer a framework to explore different therapeutic approaches to fear, memory and anxiety disorders. (2020-05-21)
Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment matter more for mental health than records
Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment show a stronger association with psychiatric problems compared to legal proof that maltreatment occurred, according to a new study co-written by a King's College London researcher. (2020-05-18)
High five! It's possible to create proximity online
Despite physical distance, it's possible to create proximity between family members located in different places. (2020-05-18)
Psychological scars for child burn survivors hurt more than physical wounds
Children and young adult burn survivors are more troubled by staring, bullying, and uncomfortable questions than the actual physical discomfort and memories of their accidents, according to research that was selected to be presented at the American Burn Association's Annual Meeting and published in the Journal of Burn Care & Research. (2020-05-12)
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