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Can sleep protect us from forgetting old memories?
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that sleep may help people to learn continuously through their lifetime by encoding new memories and protecting old ones. (2020-08-04)
Transcranial stimulation to prevent fear memories from returning
A research group at the University of Bologna developed a new non-invasive experimental protocol to alter the memory of learned fear experiences, thus paving the way for treatments to overcome traumatic events (2020-07-30)
Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-07-27)
A survey on optical memory and optical RAM technologies
The ability to store with light and built promising optical memories has been an intriguing research topic for more than two decades. (2020-07-21)
Study shows how our brains remain active during familiar, repetitive tasks
New research, based on earlier results in mice, suggests that our brains are never at rest, even when we are not learning anything about the world around us. (2020-07-14)
Why are memories attached to emotions so strong?
Multiple neurons in the brain must fire in synchrony to create persistent memories tied to intense emotions, new research from Columbia neuroscientists has found. (2020-07-13)
Robust high-performance data storage through magnetic anisotropy
A technologically relevant material for HAMR data memories are thin films of iron-platinum nanograins. (2020-07-10)
Desert island discs: Music listened to in younger years defines us forever, research finds
Researchers at the University of Westminster and City University of London analysing the music record choices of guests on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs programme has found that the music we listen to between the age of 10 and 30 define us for the rest of our lives. (2020-07-09)
NIH study finds out why some words may be more memorable than others
In a recent study of epilepsy patients and healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers found that our brains may withdraw some common words, like ''pig,'' ''tank,'' and ''door,'' much more often than others, including ''cat,'' ''street,'' and ''stair.'' By combining memory tests, brain wave recordings, and surveys of billions of words published in books, news articles and internet encyclopedia pages, the researchers not only showed how our brains may recall words but also memories of our past experiences. (2020-06-29)
Older adults share fewer memories as they age
Researchers used a smartphone app to 'eavesdrop' on older adult conversations. (2020-06-29)
'Where are my keys?' and other memory-based choices probed in the brain
Researchers from Caltech and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center visualize how memories are selectively retrieved in the brain. (2020-06-25)
UTEP researchers uncover brain mechanisms in fruit flies that may impact future learning
A research team from The University of Texas at El Paso has made strides in understanding how memories are formed through the brain mechanisms of fruit flies. (2020-06-23)
Being 'mind-blind' may make remembering, dreaming and imagining harder, study finds
Aphantasia - being blind in the mind's eye - may be linked to more cognitive functions than previously thought, new research from UNSW Sydney shows. (2020-06-22)
A fair reward ensures a good memory
By deciphering the neural dialogue between the brain's reward and memory networks, a new study demonstrates that the lasting positive effect of a reward on the ability of individuals to retain a variety of information. (2020-06-17)
A new study on rare 'split brain' patients sheds light on feature of human sleep
A new study of researchers at IMT School for Advanced Study Lucca demonstrates for the first time that the slow waves of NREM-sleep travel and propagate in the brain through ''anatomical highways''. (2020-06-17)
FSU researchers uncover new insights into Alzheimer's disease
FSU researchers looking at mouse models found impaired functional interactions between the hippocampus and the parietal cortex during the memory replay period, which may yield new insights into Alzheimer's Disease. (2020-06-17)
Clues to ageing come to light in vivid snapshots of brain cell links
Striking images of some five billion brain cell connections have been created by scientists, mapping a lifetime's changes across the brain in minute detail. (2020-06-11)
Alzheimer research: Noise-inducing neurons shut down memories
Neurons that are responsible for new experiences interfere with the signals of neurons that contain memories and thereby disturb the recall of memories - at least in mice. (2020-06-09)
Dreaming with purpose
Researchers from University of Tsukuba and the University of Tokyo have found that activity in adult-born neurons (ABNs) in the hippocampus, which is a brain region associated with memory, are responsible for memory consolidation during REM sleep. (2020-06-05)
Adult neurogenesis essential for sleep-induced memory consolidation in mice
Adult neurogenesis, in which new neurons are generated within the hippocampus in the fully developed adult brain, occurs in mice -- but how new neurons are functionally integrated into existing brain circuitry has remained largely unknown. (2020-06-04)
Graphene and 2D materials could move electronics beyond 'Moore's Law'
A team of researchers based in Manchester, the Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland and the USA has published a new review on a field of computer device development known as spintronics, which could see graphene used as building block for next-generation electronics. (2020-06-03)
Your brain needs to be ready to remember?
What happens in the hippocampus even before people attempt to form memories may impact whether they remember. (2020-06-01)
Brain's 'updating mechanisms' may create false memories
The research, published in Current Biology, is one of the first comprehensive characterizations of poorly formed memories and may offer a framework to explore different therapeutic approaches to fear, memory and anxiety disorders. (2020-05-21)
Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment matter more for mental health than records
Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment show a stronger association with psychiatric problems compared to legal proof that maltreatment occurred, according to a new study co-written by a King's College London researcher. (2020-05-18)
High five! It's possible to create proximity online
Despite physical distance, it's possible to create proximity between family members located in different places. (2020-05-18)
Psychological scars for child burn survivors hurt more than physical wounds
Children and young adult burn survivors are more troubled by staring, bullying, and uncomfortable questions than the actual physical discomfort and memories of their accidents, according to research that was selected to be presented at the American Burn Association's Annual Meeting and published in the Journal of Burn Care & Research. (2020-05-12)
A 'consciousness conductor' synchronizes and connects mouse brain areas
New research from the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) shows that slow-wave brain activity, a characteristic of sleep and resting states, is controlled by the claustrum. (2020-05-11)
Evidence that human brains replay our waking experiences while we sleep
When we fall asleep, our brains are not merely offline, they're busy organizing new memories -- and now, scientists have gotten a glimpse of the process. (2020-05-05)
Extinguishing fearful memories depends on the flexibility of your DNA
New research from the University of Queensland shows that the ability to extinguish fearful memories relies on a change in DNA structure: from Z-DNA to B-DNA. (2020-05-04)
Molecular switch plays crucial role in learning from negative experiences
Neurobiologists at KU Leuven have discovered how the signalling molecule Neuromedin U plays a crucial role in our learning process. (2020-04-29)
Actin 'avalanches' may make memories stick
Avalanches in branched actomyosin networks are one possible mechanism by which the brain's neurons preserve memories. (2020-04-20)
Discovery of a novel function for MAP2 in synaptic strengthening
The research team headed by Dr. Kea Joo Lee at KBRI discovered a new role for MAP2 in the synaptic potentiation process and expects to provide key insights into synaptic dysfunction in brain diseases. (2020-04-09)
Risk aversion as a survival strategy in ants
Ants are excellent navigators and always find their way back to the nest. (2020-04-09)
False memories of crime appear real when retold to others
People are no better than chance at identifying when someone else is recounting a false or real memory of a crime, according to a new UCL study published in Frontiers in Psychology. (2020-04-08)
Students who listened to Beethoven during lecture -- and in dreamland -- did better on test
College students who listened to classical music by Beethoven and Chopin during a computer-interactive lecture on microeconomics -- and heard the music played again that night -- did better on a test the next day than did peers who heard the same lecture, but instead slept that evening with white noise in the background. (2020-04-07)
Neuroscientists find memory cells that help us interpret new situations
MIT neuroscientists have identified populations of cells that encode distinctive segments of an overall experience. (2020-04-06)
Stress thwarts our ability to plan ahead by disrupting how we use memory
Pairing brain scans with virtual-navigation tasks, researchers found that people make less efficient and effective plans when stressed. (2020-04-02)
New research reveals that scents alter how memories are processed in the brain
New research from BU's Center for Systems Neuroscience reveals that scents alter how memories are processed in the brain. (2020-03-17)
Can traumatic memories be erased?
Tokyo, Japan - Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered that Drosophila flies lose long-term memory (LTM) of a traumatic event when kept in the dark, the first confirmation of environmental light playing a role in LTM maintenance. (2020-03-14)
How associative fear memory is formed in the brain
Using a mouse model, a pair of UC Riverside researchers demonstrated the formation of fear memory involves the strengthening of neural pathways between two brain areas: the hippocampus, which responds to a particular context and encodes it, and the amygdala, which triggers defensive behavior, including fear responses. (2020-03-13)
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