Current Meningitis News and Events

Current Meningitis News and Events, Meningitis News Articles.
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Potential treatment against antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing gonorrhea and meningitis
A team from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has demonstrated the effectiveness of an inexpensive molecule to fight antibiotic-resistant strains of the bacteria responsible for gonorrhea and meningococcal meningitis. These two infections affect millions of people worldwide. The results of this research, led by Professor Frédéric Veyrier and Professor Annie Castonguay, have just been published online in the Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy journal. (2020-11-24)

The gut trains the immune system to protect the brain
The membranes surrounding our brains are in a never-ending battle against deadly infections, as germs constantly try to elude watchful immune cells and sneak past a special protective barrier called the meninges. In a study involving mice and human autopsy tissue, researchers at the National Institutes of Health and Cambridge University have shown that some of these immune cells are trained to fight these infections by first spending time in the gut. (2020-11-04)

Invisible threat: Listeria in smoked fish
Fish should be a regular component of our diets. It is an important source of biologically high-quality and easily digestible protein, minerals and vitamins. However, raw, smoked and cured fish products also often contain pathogenic germs, notably listeria. People can become infected by eating contaminated food and become ill with listeriosis. (2020-10-07)

Vaccine narrows racial disparities in pneumococcal disease
In a major public health success, the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine PCV13, or Prevnar 13, in 2010 in the United States is associated with reduction in socioeconomic disparities and the near elimination of Black-white-based racial disparities for invasive pneumococcal disease. (2020-08-31)

AI accurately identifies infants with low risk of serious bacterial infection
Artificial intelligence, or 'supervised machine learning,' could help identify which well-appearing infants with fever, who are 60 days old or younger, are at low risk for a serious bacterial infection, according to a study published in Pediatrics. Accurate risk determination could reduce unnecessary lumbar puncture, antibiotics and hospitalizations for these infants, as well as decreasing parental anxiety. (2020-08-27)

Children's National Hospital case report sounds the alarm for antibiotic resistance
A recent meningitis case at Children's National Hospital raises serious concerns about antibiotic resistance in the common bacterium that caused it, researchers from the hospital write in a case report. Their findings, published online August 3 in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society, could change laboratory and clinical practice across the US and potentially around the globe (2020-08-03)

Microglia in the olfactory bulb have a nose for protecting the brain from infection
Researchers at NINDS have identified a specific, front-line defense that limits the infection to the olfactory bulb and protects the neurons of the olfactory bulb from damage due to the infection. Although the location of nasal neurons and their exposure to the outside environment make them an easy target for infection by airborne viruses, viral respiratory infections rarely make their way from the olfactory bulb to the rest of the brain, where they could cause potentially fatal encephalitis. (2020-06-05)

Small protein, big impact
In meningococci, the RNA-binding protein ProQ plays a major role. Together with RNA molecules, it regulates processes that are important for pathogenic properties of the bacteria. (2020-06-04)

A potential new weapon in the war against superbugs
Researchers in Melbourne, Australia have shown that a newly discovered natural antibiotic, teixobactin, could be effective in treating bacterial lung conditions such as tuberculosis and those commonly associated with COVID-19. (2020-06-03)

European vaccination survey shows wide variety of parents' opinions across UK, Italy, France, Spain and Germany
A survey of five European countries shows that parents in Spain are the most pro-vaccination (94%) while those in France (73%) are the least in favour of vaccination. One in 30 sets of parents in the UK and Germany are against all vaccinations, no matter which disease they are for. The survey results are part of a study due to be presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) (2020-04-20)

Risk factors for carrying pneumonia-causing bacteria revealed
New research has uncovered the risk factors for Fijians carrying a pneumonia-causing bacteria. (2020-04-08)

Complications of measles can include hepatitis, appendicitis, and viral meningitis, doctors warn
The complications of measles can be many and varied, and more serious than people might realise, doctors have warned in the journal BMJ Case Reports after treating a series of adults with the infection. (2020-02-17)

Pneumococcal vaccines are effective -- But new strategies needed to reduce meningitis
Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have been highly effective in reducing pneumonia and other invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria. But rates of meningitis have shown little change, as pneumococcal strains not targeted by PCVs emerge as more important causes of meningitis, reports a paper in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, the official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-02-07)

New research into how peace of mind can influence parents' attitude to vaccines
Research from Bristol University on parents' peace of mind and vaccinations gives us insight that beliefs about vaccines can change, and that peace of mind varies according to different factors. The MenB vaccine, although considered 'new' provided increased reassurance because of the perceived disease severity. Meningitis Research Foundation says parents' peace of mind is currently being ignored when health bodies weigh up vaccine benefits to make decisions whether to introduce vaccines or expand their coverage. (2020-02-04)

Pioneering SFU research customizes vaccines to reduce bacterial disease
The invention of vaccines for disease prevention is often cited as one of the miracles of modern medicine. New research from Simon Fraser University suggests that tailoring vaccines based on geography and other factors could substantially reduce overall rates of bacterial disease. (2020-02-03)

New research uncovers improvements in vaccines against meningitis
New research from experts at the University of Nottingham could lead to an improved vaccine to protect against the bacterium, Neisseria meningitides that causes sepsis and meningitis. (2019-12-20)

Current treatment for fungal meningitis is fueling drug resistance
A common first-line treatment approach for cryptococcal meningitis in low-income countries is being compromised by the emergence of drug resistance, new University of Liverpool research warns. Published in the journal mBio, the findings highlight the need to develop new drugs and treatment regimens for the lethal brain infection, which kills around 180,000 people each year. (2019-12-06)

BU finds PTSD nearly doubles infection risk
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study is the first to examine the relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dozens of infection types in a nationwide cohort. Published in the journal Epidemiology, it is also the first to find that PTSD affects infection risks for men and women differently, having, for example, more of an effect on a woman's risk of urinary tract infection and a man's risk of skin infection. (2019-10-15)

Weak immune system linked to serious bacterial infection in children
A new study has found a bacterial infection that can lead to pneumonia or meningitis is linked to weakened immune systems in children. (2019-10-14)

UMD discovers new mechanism in the liver that helps prevent invasive fungal infections
An expert in intravital microscopy, Meiqing Shi, University of Maryland, is making breakthroughs in invasive fungal infections. In Nature Communications, Shi has discovered a pathway by which liver macrophages capture fungi before dissemination to target organs like the brain. This not only provides an explanation as to why individuals with liver disease have enhanced risk of fungal infection, but also points to therapeutic options to prevent these infections, which kill 1.5 million people annually. (2019-10-08)

Young infants with fever may be more likely to develop infections
Infants with a high fever may be at increased risk for infections, according to research from Penn State College of Medicine. (2019-10-07)

Physicians report high refusal rates for the HPV vaccine and need for improvement
Despite its proven success at preventing cancer, many adolescents are still not getting the HPV vaccine. A new study from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus shows that physicians' delivery and communication practices must improve to boost vaccination completion rates. (2019-09-16)

Bacteria in pneumonia attack using bleaching agent
Research shows that bacteria use hydrogen peroxide to weaken the immune system and cause pneumonia. This according to a study at Umeå University and Stockholm University, Sweden. Hydrogen peroxide is also known as a bleaching agent that is used to whiten teeth or hair, as a stain remover, as well as for cleaning surfaces and disinfecting wounds. (2019-09-02)

Study explores blood-brain barrier leakage in CNS infections
A new study published in the journal mBio shines light on the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that occurs during many infections of the central nervous system. The findings implicate interferon gamma, a major cytokine upregulated in most central nervous system (CNS) viral infections, as a major contributor of blood brain barrier breakdown. (2019-08-06)

New twist on old surgical technique helps repair patient's skull base
A Rutgers-led team of surgeons developed a groundbreaking procedure based on a paramedian forehead flap, a century-old plastic surgery technique, to save the life of a patient who suffered complications following the removal of a cancerous tumor inside his skull. This method can help other patients with similar complications, for whom all other solutions have failed. (2019-07-31)

An improved vaccine for bacterial meningitis and bloodstream infections
Researchers have now developed a new vaccine, a native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine, for meningitis and bloodstream infections caused by 'meningococcal group B' bacteria. This will allow younger people to be vaccinated and will address several limitations of the current vaccinations. (2019-06-28)

How inhaled fungal spores cause fatal meningitis
Pathogenic fungal spores capitalize on host immune cells to escape the lung and gain access to the brain to cause fatal disease in mice, according to a study published June 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Christina Hull of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and colleagues. These insights into the interactions between pathogenic fungal spores and lung immune cells provide new opportunities for understanding spore-mediated fungal diseases. (2019-06-27)

Making it personal: How genetic technologies are changing the face of medicine
Doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and other sites show how personalized medicine can be used to pinpoint the source of infection. A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that genetic testing can lead to higher rates of diagnosis in patients with meningitis and encephalitis. (2019-06-13)

Nicotine and caffeine withdrawal may lead to unnecessary suffering and testing in intensive care patients
Nicotine and caffeine withdrawal can cause unnecessary suffering to patients in intensive care units (ICUs), and could be leading to unneeded laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging such as X-rays and MRIs, according to a systematic review of clinical and observational studies involving 483 adults. (2019-05-31)

A considerable percentage of deaths in HIV patients are due to cryptococcal infections
Cryptococcal meningitis causes about one in ten HIV-related deaths, according to a study of autopsies performed in Mozambique and Brazil and coordinated by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa'. (2019-05-21)

User-friendly smartphone platform sounds out possible ear infections in children
Scientists have created a user-friendly smartphone-based platform that can quickly detect the presence of fluid in the middle ear -- a likely indicator of ear infections -- in children. (2019-05-15)

Progress against child mortality lags in many Indian states
India in 2015 had more deaths among children under five than any other country and had large disparities in the under-five mortality rate between richer and poorer states, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-05-14)

New research uncovers how life-threatening fungal diseases adapt to survive in humans
A new study from The Westmead Institute for Medical Research has uncovered how serious fungal infections grow in humans by conserving phosphate, highlighting a possible target for treatment. (2019-05-06)

Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'
Molecular details on how harmful bacteria attach to the human body have been revealed for the first time by researchers from the La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science (LIMS). This new knowledge could have huge impacts in anti-microbial development. (2019-04-29)

New research reviews the state of vaccine safety science
A new systematic review provides a succinct summary of the scientific evidence for and/or against causal associations for 47 adverse events following immunization (AEFI). Findings from the study will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2019 Meeting. (2019-04-27)

New non-antibiotic strategy for the treatment of bacterial meningitis
With the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance, there is a growing need for new treatment strategies against life threatening bacterial infections. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden and the University of Copenhagen may have identified such an alternative treatment for bacterial meningitis, a serious infection that can lead to sepsis. The study is published in Nature Communications. (2019-04-10)

Examining ball pits as a playground for pathogenic germs
Beware the ball pit. Ball pits used in children's physical therapy -- similar to those made popular by restaurants catering to families -- may contribute to germ transmission between patients, according to new research published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, published by Elsevier. (2019-03-21)

Meningitis changes immune cell makeup in the mouse brain lining
Meningitis, a group of serious diseases which infect the brain's lining, leaves its mark and can affect the body's ability to fight such infections in the future. According to a new study published in Nature Immunology, infections can have long-lasting effects on a population of meningeal immune cells, replacing them with cells from outside the meninges that then change and become less likely to recognize and ward off future attacks. (2019-03-18)

Winning the arms race: Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection
Researchers at Osaka University applied molecular evolutionary analysis to quantify the severity of negative selection pressures on genes encoding the pneumococcal choline-binding proteins (CBPs). They found particularly strong selective constraints on the gene cbpJ, suggesting its importance for bacterial infection. Further analyses revealed its role in bacterial evasion of host neutrophils, suggesting CbpJ's value as a target for drugs against streptococci. (2019-03-11)

New protocol could ease diagnosis of bacterial infections in infants
A new protocol could help emergency room physicians to rule out life-threatening bacterial infections among infants up to 2 months of age who have fevers, potentially eliminating the need for spinal taps, unnecessary antibiotic treatments or expensive hospital stays. (2019-02-18)

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