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Current Microbiology News and Events

Current Microbiology News and Events, Microbiology News Articles.
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Symbiotic upcycling: Turning 'low value' compounds into biomass
Kentron, a bacterial symbiont of ciliates, turns cellular waste products into biomass. (2019-06-25)
Prolonged transmission of a resistant bacterial strain in a Northern California hospital
Researchers have used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to demonstrate transmission of a single bacterial strain that possessed a carbapenem-resistance gene in a northern California hospital. (2019-06-23)
Understanding C. auris transmission with the healthcare environment
Researchers have now shown that patients who are heavily colonized with Candida auris on their skin can shed the fungus and contaminate their surroundings. (2019-06-23)
Cannabidiol is a powerful new antibiotic
New research has found that Cannnabidiol is active against Gram-positive bacteria, including those responsible for many serious infections (such as Staphyloccocus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae), with potency similar to that of established antibiotics such as vancomycin or daptomycin. (2019-06-23)
The solution to antibiotic resistance could be in your kitchen sponge
Researchers from the New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) have discovered bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, living in their kitchen sponges. (2019-06-23)
Plants may be transmitting superbugs to people
Antibiotic-resistant infections are a threat to global public health, food safety and an economic burden. (2019-06-22)
Ocean swimming alters skin microbiome, increasing vulnerability to infection
Swimming in the ocean alters the skin microbiome and may increase the likelihood of infection, according to research presented at ASM Microbe 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. (2019-06-22)
Antibiotic resistance in spore-forming probiotic bacteria
New research has found that six probiotic Bacillus strains are resistant to several antibiotics. (2019-06-21)
Experiments with salt-tolerant bacteria in brine have implications for life on Mars
Salt-tolerant bacteria grown in brine were able to revive after the brine was put through a cycle of drying and rewetting. (2019-06-21)
Dissemination of pathogenic bacteria by university student's cell phones
New research has demonstrated the presence of S. aureus in 40% of the cell phones of students sampled at a university. (2019-06-21)
Combination of drugs may combat deadly drug-resistant fungus
Microbiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have shown that a combination of anti-fungal and anti-bacterial medications may be an effective weapon against the recently discovered multidrug resistant, Candida auris (C. auris). (2019-06-21)
A single gut enterotype linked to both inflammatory bowel disease and depression
In 2012, Professor Jeroen Raes (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology) launched the Flemish Gut Flora Project. (2019-06-17)
Salmonella resistant to antibiotics of last resort found in US
Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a gene that gives Salmonella resistance to antibiotics of last resort in a sample taken from a human patient in the US The find is the first evidence that the gene mcr-3.1 has made its way into the US from Asia. (2019-06-13)
How the cell protects itself
The cell contains transcripts of the genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell. (2019-06-12)
Deceptively simple: Minute marine animals live in a sophisticated symbiosis with bacteria
Trichoplax, one of the simplest animals on Earth, lives in a highly specific and intimate symbiosis with two types of bacteria. (2019-06-10)
Best practices of nucleic acid amplification tests for the diagnosis of clostridioides (clostridium)
A new review looks at the challenges of testing for Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile infection (CDI) and recommendations for newer diagnostic tests. (2019-06-04)
Viral study suggests an approach that may decrease kidney damage in transplant patients
Sunnie Thompson's study of BK polyomavirus replication may lead to less failure of kidneys following organ transplant. (2019-05-29)
When macrophages are deprived of oxygen
Infected tissue has a low concentration of oxygen. The body's standard immune mechanisms, which rely on oxygen, can then only function to a limited extent. (2019-05-24)
Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests
A meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies of soil biodiversity in Amazonian forests found that the abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of soil fauna and microbes were reduced following deforestation. (2019-05-24)
Paper stickers to monitor pathogens are more effective than swabs
Using paper stickers to collect pathogens on surfaces where antisepsis is required, such as in food processing plants, is easier, and less expensive than swabbing, yet similarly sensitive. (2019-05-24)
The top 25 medical lab tests around the world
A recent study can help governments understand which diagnostic laboratory tests are most important when developing universal health coverage systems. (2019-05-22)
Detecting bacteria in space
A new genomic approach provides a glimpse into the diverse bacterial ecosystem on the International Space Station. (2019-05-22)
Re-designing hydrogenases
EPFL chemists have synthesized the first ever functional non-native metal hydrogenase. (2019-05-21)
Symbionts as lifesavers
When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. (2019-05-14)
How proteins help influenza A bind and slice its way to cells
Researchers have provided new insight on how two proteins help influenza A virus particles fight their way to human cells. (2019-05-14)
OU study expands understanding of bacterial communities for wastewater treatment system
A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary global study expands the understanding of activated sludge microbiomes for next-generation wastewater treatment and reuse systems enhanced by microbiome engineering. (2019-05-13)
Amid genomic data explosion, scientists find proliferating errors
Washington State University researchers found a troubling number of errors in publicly available genomic data as they conducted a large-scale analysis of protein sequences. (2019-04-30)
Mass drug administrations can grant population protection against malaria
Researchers have provided the first evidence that mass drug administration (MDA) can grant community-level protection against Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria. (2019-04-16)
US and Japanese researchers identify how liver cells protect against viral attacks
Researchers in Chapel Hill, N.C., and Tokyo have discovered a mechanism by which liver cells intrinsic resistance to diverse RNA viruses is regulated. (2019-04-15)
New gene variant is even more resistant to hospital antiseptic
A team of investigators has discovered a new, more powerful variant on an antimicrobial resistance gene common among Staphylococcus species. (2019-04-15)
Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn
Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn, according to Rutgers-led research that helps explain the genetic instability in certain strains and may lead to better breeding of corn and other crops. (2019-04-15)
Antibiotics legitimately available in over-counter throat medications could contribute to increased antibiotic resistance
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the inappropriate of use of antibiotics legitimately available in over-the-counter (OTC) throat medications could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, thereby going against World Health Organization (WHO) goals. (2019-04-11)
Gut microbiota and phytoestrogen-associated infertility in southern white rhinoceros
Researchers from the San Diego Zoo Global Institute for Conservation Research have found the gut microbiota of the captive southern white rhinoceros may partially explain its infertility. (2019-04-09)
Intestinal helminths boost fat burning: Japanese investigators show how
Intestinal infection with helminths -- a class of worm-like parasites -- prevented weight gain in laboratory mice on a high-fat diet. (2019-04-08)
Patients harboring E. coli with highly resistant MCR-1 gene found In NYC hospital
A team of investigators has identified a cluster of four patients harboring Escherichia coli carrying a rare antibiotic resistance gene, mcr-1. (2019-04-08)
Bacterial contamination in household and office building tap water
Water is a source of concern for disseminating the bacteria Legionella pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium, which cause lung disease (legionellosis and pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterium disease, respectively). (2019-03-20)
Discovery of parasitic arsenic cycle may offer glimpse of life in future, warmer oceans
A newly discovered parasitic cycle, in which ocean bacteria keep phytoplankton on an energy-sapping treadmill of nutrient detoxification, may offer a preview of what further ocean warming will bring. (2019-03-19)
Microbes can grow on nitric oxide
Nitric oxide (NO) is a central molecule of the global nitrogen cycle. (2019-03-18)
Discovery upturns understanding of how some viruses multiply
Scientists have shown that different segments of a virus genome can exist in distinct cells but work together to cause an infection. (2019-03-12)
Protection from Zika virus may lie in a protein derived from mosquitoes
By targeting a protein found in the saliva of mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, Yale investigators reduced Zika infection in mice. (2019-03-11)
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