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Current Microbiology News and Events

Current Microbiology News and Events, Microbiology News Articles.
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How plants handle stress
Plants get stressed too. Drought or too much salt disrupt their physiology. (2019-11-20)
Deep-sea bacteria copy their neighbors' diet
A new group of symbiotic bacteria in deep-sea mussels surprises with the way they fix carbon: They use the Calvin cycle to turn carbon into tasty food. (2019-11-19)
Antibiotics from the sea
The team led by Prof. Christian Jogler of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, has succeeded in cultivating several dozen marine bacteria in the laboratory -- bacteria that had previously been paid little attention. (2019-11-18)
Study reveals 'bug wars' that take place in cystic fibrosis
Scientists have revealed how common respiratory bugs that cause serious infections in people with cystic fibrosis interact together, according to a new study in eLife. (2019-11-12)
Copper hospital beds kill bacteria, save lives
A new study has found that copper hospital beds in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) harbored an average of 95% fewer bacteria than conventional hospital beds, and maintained these low-risk levels throughout patients' stay in hospital. (2019-11-08)
E. coli gain edge by changing their diets in inflammatory bowel disease
In a new paper in Nature Microbiology, Michigan Medicine researchers describe how bad bacteria gain a foothold over good bacteria in IBD and how something as simple as a diet change might reverse it. (2019-11-05)
Infectious cancer in mussels spread across the Atlantic
An infectious cancer that originated in 1 species of mussel growing in the Northern Hemisphere has spread to related mussels in South America and Europe, says a new study published today in eLife. (2019-11-05)
Red algae thrive despite ancestor's massive loss of genes
You'd think that losing 25 percent of your genes would be a big problem for survival. (2019-10-29)
New insight on how bacteria evolve drug resistance could lead to improved antibiotic therapies
Researchers have provided new insight into a mechanism behind the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a type of bacterium that causes severe infections in humans. (2019-10-29)
The secret of classic Belgian beers? Medieval super yeasts!
An international team of scientists, led by Prof. Kevin Verstrepen (VIB-KU-Leuven) and Prof. (2019-10-21)
Resistance to last resort drug arose in patient over 3 weeks
French investigators have described development of resistance to one of the last resort therapies used to treat extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (2019-10-21)
OU-led study reveals dry season increase in photosynthesis in Amazon rain forest
A University of Oklahoma-led study demonstrated the potential of the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument on board the Copernicus Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite to measure and track chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis of tropical forests in the Amazon. (2019-10-21)
Scientists work toward a rapid point-of-care diagnostic test for Lyme disease
A study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology describes a new rapid assay for Lyme disease that could lead to a practical test for use by healthcare providers. (2019-10-16)
Many cooks don't spoil the broth: Manifold symbionts prepare the host for any eventuality
Deep-sea mussels, which rely on symbiotic bacteria for food, harbor a surprisingly high diversity of these bacterial 'cooks': Up to 16 different bacterial strains live in the mussel's gills, each with its own abilities and strengths. (2019-10-15)
Tiny droplets allow bacteria to survive daytime dryness on leaves
Microscopic droplets on the surface of leaves give refuge to bacteria that otherwise may not survive during the dry daytime, according to a new study published today in eLife. (2019-10-15)
Highly virulent listeriosis pathogen discovered
An international team of researchers identifies the genetic basis for the hypervirulence of a Listeria strain that can cause severe infections. (2019-10-09)
DNA metabarcoding useful for analyzing human diet
A new study demonstrates that DNA metabarcoding provides a promising new method for tracking human plant intake, suggesting that similar approaches could be used to characterize the animal and fungal components of human diets. (2019-10-08)
New AI Method May Boost Crohn's Disease Insight and Improve Treatment
Scientists have developed a computer method that may help improve understanding and treatment of Crohn's disease, which causes inflammation of the digestive tract. (2019-09-30)
Your energy-efficient washing machine could be harboring pathogens
For the first time ever, investigators have identified a washing machine as a reservoir of multidrug-resistant pathogens. (2019-09-27)
Tapeworms need to keep their head to regenerate
Scientists have identified the stem cells that allow tapeworms to regenerate and found that their location in proximity to the head is essential, according to a new study in eLife. (2019-09-24)
More than lyme: Tick study finds multiple agents of tick-borne diseases
In a study published in mBio, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology, Jorge Benach and Rafal Tokarz, and their co-authors at Stony Brook University and Columbia University, reported on the prevalence of multiple agents capable of causing human disease that are present in three species of ticks in Long Island. (2019-09-16)
Genetically engineered plasmid can be used to fight antimicrobial resistance
Researchers have engineered a plasmid to remove an antibiotic resistance gene from the Enterococcus faecalis bacterium, an accomplishment that could lead to new methods for combating antibiotic resistance. (2019-09-16)
Specialized training benefits young STEM researchers
The First-year Research Immersion (FRI) program at Binghamton University, State University of New York has proven that young college students are capable of leading real research. (2019-09-12)
Prolonged antibiotic treatment may alter preterm infants' microbiome
Treating preterm infants with antibiotics for more than 20 months appears to promote the development of multidrug-resistant gut bacteria, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2019-09-09)
New study tracks sulfur-based metabolism in the open ocean
Oceanographers found that marine microbes process sulfonate, a plentiful marine nutrient, in a way that is similar to soils. (2019-09-05)
The argument for sexual selection in bacteria
The evolutionary pressure to pass on DNA can produce behavior that otherwise makes no sense in a struggle to survive. (2019-09-04)
Scientists successfully innoculate, grow crops in salt-damaged soil
A group of researchers may have found a way to reverse falling crop yields caused by increasingly salty farmlands throughout the world. (2019-08-22)
All-in-one: New microbe degrades oil to gas
The tiny organisms cling to oil droplets and perform a great feat: As a single organism, they may produce methane from oil by a process called alkane disproportionation. (2019-08-20)
How coastal mud holds the key to climate cooling gas
Bacteria found in muddy marshes, estuaries and coastal sediment synthesise one of the Earth's most abundant climate cooling gases -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2019-08-19)
Researchers show how probiotics benefit vaginal health
Researchers have shown that three genes from a probiotic Lactobacillus species, used in some commercial probiotic vaginal capsules, are almost certainly involved in mediating adhesion to the vaginal epithelium. (2019-08-16)
New quantitative method standardizes phage virulence determination
Researchers have developed a simple, fast, and standardized method for measuring phage virulence quantitatively, which can expediate phage therapy development by allowing robust individual and combined testing of phage efficacy. (2019-08-07)
Mouse genetics influences the microbiome more than environment
Genetics has a greater impact on the microbiome than maternal birth environment, at least in mice, according to a study published this week in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. (2019-07-26)
Rise of Candida auris blamed on global warming
Global warming may have played a pivotal role in the emergence of Candida auris, according to a new study published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2019-07-23)
E. coli superbug strains can persist in healthy women's guts
A study of over 1,000 healthy women with no urinary tract infection symptoms showed nearly 9% carried multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli strains in their guts. (2019-07-23)
Red algae steal genes from bacteria to cope with environmental stresses
It's a case of grand larceny that could lead to new fuels and cleanup chemicals. (2019-07-17)
UMN researcher identifies differences in genes that impact response to cryptococcus infection
Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that infects people with weakened immune systems, particularly those with advanced HIV/AIDS. (2019-07-16)
Gut microbes protect against neurologic damage from viral infections
Gut microbes produce compounds that prime immune cells to destroy harmful viruses in the brain and nervous system, according to a mouse study published today in eLife. (2019-07-16)
C. difficile resists hospital disinfectant, persists on hospital gowns, stainless steel
Surgical gowns and stainless steel remained contaminated with the pathogen Clostridium difficile even after being treated with the recommended disinfectant. (2019-07-12)
Successful T cell engineering with gene scissors
The idea of genetically modifying a patient's own immune cells and deploying them against infections and tumors has been around since the 1980s. (2019-07-11)
Scientists identify new virus-killing protein
A new protein called KHNYN has been identified as a missing piece in a natural antiviral system that kills viruses by targeting a specific pattern in viral genomes, according to new findings published today in eLife. (2019-07-09)
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