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Current Microtubule News and Events

Current Microtubule News and Events, Microtubule News Articles.
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Autophagy: Scientists discover novel role for self-recycling process in the brain
Proteins classically associated with autophagy regulate the speed of intracellular transport. (2020-03-31)
NCAM2 protein plays a decisive role in the formation of structures for cognitive learning
The molecule NCAM2, a glycoprotein from the superfamily of immunoglobulins, is a vital factor in the formation of the cerebral cortex, neuronal morphogenesis and formation of neuronal circuits in the brain, as stated in the new study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex. (2020-03-13)
Gene variants may increase susceptibility to accumulate Alzheimer's protein tau
The toxic protein tau is a key biological feature in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. (2020-03-03)
Actin filaments control the shape of the cell structure that divides plant cells
A Japanese research group using microscopic video analysis provides deeper insight into the mechanics of plant cell division. (2020-02-28)
A scaffold at the center of our cellular skeleton
When the cells stop dividing, the centrioles migrate to the plasma membrane and allow the formation of primary and mobile cilia, which are used for the transfer of information and the genesis of movement. (2020-02-20)
Tiny, erratic protein motor movements revealed
The smallest proteins travel in our cells, completing deeply important tasks to keep our molecular mechanisms moving. (2020-02-14)
Physics of Life -- Lane change in the cytoskeleton
Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. (2020-02-12)
Lane change in the cytoskeleton
Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. (2020-02-12)
How plants are built to be strong and responsive
Researchers have solved the long-standing mystery of how plants control the arrangement of their cellulose fibres. (2020-02-06)
Herringbone pattern in plant cell walls critical to cell growth
Plant cells tend to grow longer instead of wider due to the alignment of the many layers of cellulose that make up their cell walls, according to a new study that may have implications for biofuels research. (2020-02-04)
Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant
Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). (2020-01-22)
Study uncovers unexpected connection between gliomas, neurodegenerative diseases
New basic science and clinical research identifies TAU, the same protein studied in the development of Alzheimer's, as a biomarker for glioma development. (2020-01-22)
POSTECH developed self-assembled artificial microtubule like LEGO building blocks
Professor Kimoon Kim and his research team identified a new hierarchical self-assembly mechanism (2020-01-16)
How cells assemble their skeleton
Microtubules, filamentous structures within the cell, are required for many important processes, including cell division and intracellular transport. (2020-01-15)
Researchers unlock secrets of cell division, define role for protein elevated in cancer
Researchers at Princeton University have successfully recreated a key process involved in cell division in a test tube, uncovering the vital role played by a protein that is elevated in over 25% of all cancers. (2020-01-14)
Animal study finds link between MAP2 mutation and hereditary hair diseases
The genetic mechanism of hereditary human hair diseases, such as alopecia and thinning hair, has drawn much attention in human genetics research, yet many questions around this mechanism persist. (2019-11-21)
Computer model described the dynamic instability of microtubules
Researchers of Sechenov University together with their colleagues from several Russian institutes studied the dynamics of microtubules that form the basis of the cytoskeleton and take part in the transfer of particles within a cell and its division. (2019-11-19)
Cytoplasm of scrambled frog eggs organizes into cell-like structures, Stanford study finds
The cytoplasm of ruptured Xenopus frog eggs spontaneously reorganizes into cell-like compartments, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2019-11-06)
A simple way to control swarming molecular machines
The swarming behavior of about 100 million molecular machines can be controlled by applying simple mechanical stimuli such as extension and contraction. (2019-10-08)
How newly found tension sensor plays integral role in aligned chromosome partitioning
A Waseda University-led research found that oncogene SET/TAF1, which was found to be a proto-oncogene of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), contributes to proper chromosome partitioning as a tension sensor. (2019-09-30)
A new mechanism has been revealed which could lead to premature ageing in mother cells
This new mechanism makes it possible to understand premature ageing in cells with asymmetrical cell division, as is the case with mother cells. (2019-09-30)
Where to park your car, according to math
In a world where the best parking space is the one that minimizes time spent in the lot, 2 physicists compare parking strategies and settle on a prudent approach. (2019-09-19)
Stabilizing neuronal branching for healthy brain circuitry
Novel molecular mechanism may regulate microtubule stability, important for neuronal branching and potentially for nerve regeneration. (2019-09-18)
How microtubules branch in new directions, a first look in animals
Cell biologist Thomas Maresca and senior research fellow Vikash Verma at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say they have, for the first time, directly observed and recorded in animal cells a pathway called branching microtubule nucleation, a mechanism in cell division that had been imaged in cellular extracts and plant cells but not directly observed in animal cells. (2019-09-13)
Researchers develop new interferometric single-molecule localization microscopy
Prof. XU Tao and Prof. JI Wei from Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a new interferometric single molecule localization microscopy with fast modulated structured illumination which named Repetitive Optical Selective Exposure (ROSE). (2019-09-09)
Mystery solved about the machines that move your genes
Researchers have discovered how the chromosome-dividing spindle avoids slowdowns: congestion. (2019-09-02)
Controlling the shape-shifting skeletons of cells
In studying the dynamic skeletons that cells use to move, Caltech researchers develop a new tool for manipulating chemistry and biology. (2019-08-08)
Pancreatic cancer: Less toxic, more enduring drug may improve therapy
A new drug that penetrates the protective barrier around pancreatic cancers and accumulates in malignant cells may improve current chemotherapy, a study in mice suggests. (2019-08-08)
Deregulated mTOR is responsible for autophagy defects exacerbating kidney stone formation
Kidney stone disease is a lifestyle-related disease prevalent; however, effective medical treatment for the disease is not yet well established. (2019-08-06)
Reverse engineering the fireworks of life
An interdisciplinary team of Princeton researchers has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching. (2019-08-02)
Marathon-running molecule could speed up the race for new neurological treatments
Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered a new process that sets the fastest molecular motor on its marathon-like runs through our neurons. (2019-07-12)
Cofilin may be early culprit in tauopathy process leading to brain cell death
Abnormal accumulations of amyloid plaques and tau neurofibrillary tangles are both needed to drive the death of brain cells, or neurons. (2019-05-14)
Machinery used in basic cell division does double duty as builder of neurons
Researchers at the San Diego branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at University of California San Diego have identified an entirely new mechanism underlying the development and structure of the nervous system during embryogenesis. (2019-02-28)
How our cellular antennas are formed
Most of our cells contain an immobile primary cilium. The 'skeleton' of the cilium consists of microtubule doublets, which are 'pairs' of proteins essential for their formation and function. (2019-01-17)
Progress in super-resolution microscopy
Does expansion microscopy deliver true-to-life images of cellular structures? That was not sure yet. (2018-12-17)
Improved understanding of the pathology of dwarfism may lead to new treatment targets
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a severe inherited dwarfing condition In PSACH, a genetic mutation leads to abnormal retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cartilage-producing cells (chondrocytes), which interferes with function and cell viability. (2018-12-12)
A new molecular player involved in T cell activation
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have imaged live T cells to reveal the role of CLIP-170 in T-cell activation, a critical process in the immune response. (2018-12-06)
Gold nanoparticle microsecond tracking with atomic-level localization precision achieved
Gold nanoparticles have been used as an optical probe of high-localization precision, high-speed single-molecule tracking of protein molecular motors. (2018-11-28)
Plant root hairs form outward due to shank hardening
Plant root hairs increase the roots surface area enabling it to absorb more water and nutrients. (2018-11-20)
Visualizing 'unfurling' microtubule growth
Living cells depend absolutely on microtubules that form a scaffolding for moving materials inside the cell. (2018-11-13)
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