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Current Microtubules News and Events

Current Microtubules News and Events, Microtubules News Articles.
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Success in promoting plant growth for biodiesel
Scientists of Waseda University in Japan succeeded in promoting plant growth and increasing seed yield by heterologous expression of protein from Arabidopsis (artificially modified high-speed motor protein) in Camelina sativa, which is expected as a useful plant for biodiesel. (2020-08-07)
Protein linked to cancer acts as a viscous glue in cell division
The protein PRC1, a telltale sign in many cancer types including prostate, ovarian, and breast cancer, act as a ''viscous glue'' during cell division, precisely controlling the speed at which two sets of DNA are separated as a single cell divides. (2020-07-07)
Biologists unravel tangled mystery of plant cell growth
When cells don't divide into proper copies of themselves, living things fail to grow as they should. (2020-06-22)
HKU scientists uncover new mechanism for balancing protein stability during neuronal development
A School of Biological Sciences research team at the University of Hong Kong recently discovered an unexpected role of the heat shock proteins (HSPs) during neuronal differentiation. (2020-06-16)
HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus collectively through the nuclear endocytosis-like pathway
How HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus through the undersized nuclear pore remains mysterious. (2020-06-01)
Programming with the light switch
Freiburg researchers show how to control individual components of self-assembling molecular structures. (2020-05-06)
Biochemists unveil molecular mechanism for motor protein regulation
Researchers have unveiled the mechanism by which one particular molecule affects dynein function. (2020-04-27)
Autophagy: Scientists discover novel role for self-recycling process in the brain
Proteins classically associated with autophagy regulate the speed of intracellular transport. (2020-03-31)
Cellular train track deformities shed light on neurological disease
A new technique allows researchers to test how the deformation of tiny train track-like cell proteins affects their function. (2020-03-27)
NCAM2 protein plays a decisive role in the formation of structures for cognitive learning
The molecule NCAM2, a glycoprotein from the superfamily of immunoglobulins, is a vital factor in the formation of the cerebral cortex, neuronal morphogenesis and formation of neuronal circuits in the brain, as stated in the new study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex. (2020-03-13)
Research reveals collective dynamics of active matter systems
A study provides new details about the collective motion of individual agents in a liquid-crystal-like system, which could help in better understanding bacterial colonies, structures and systems in the human body, and other forms of active matter. (2020-03-09)
First real-time observation of the chaos within 3D liquid crystals
A new study offers the opportunity to watch dynamic 3D liquid crystal systems and the chaotic motion within that until now have largely been studied through theory and simulations. (2020-03-05)
Actin filaments control the shape of the cell structure that divides plant cells
A Japanese research group using microscopic video analysis provides deeper insight into the mechanics of plant cell division. (2020-02-28)
A scaffold at the center of our cellular skeleton
When the cells stop dividing, the centrioles migrate to the plasma membrane and allow the formation of primary and mobile cilia, which are used for the transfer of information and the genesis of movement. (2020-02-20)
Parkinson's disease protein structure solved inside cells using novel technique
The top contributor to familial Parkinson's disease is mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), whose large and difficult structure has finally been solved, paving the way for targeted therapies. (2020-02-15)
Physics of Life -- Lane change in the cytoskeleton
Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. (2020-02-12)
Lane change in the cytoskeleton
Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. (2020-02-12)
How plants are built to be strong and responsive
Researchers have solved the long-standing mystery of how plants control the arrangement of their cellulose fibres. (2020-02-06)
U of T researchers discover intricate process of DNA repair in genome stability
An elaborate system of filaments, liquid droplet dynamics and protein connectors enables the repair of some damaged DNA in the nuclei of cells, researchers at the University of Toronto have found. (2020-02-04)
Unique centromere type discovered in the European dodder
Commonly, the presence of histone variant CENH3 epigenetically determines the positioning of centromeres. (2020-01-27)
Deep-sea osmolyte makes biomolecular machines heat-tolerant
Researchers have discovered a method to control biomolecular machines over a wide temperature range using deep-sea osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). (2020-01-22)
How're your cells' motors running?
Kyoto University researchers develop a device that parks individual molecular motors on nano scale platforms and found that two types of 'kinesin' possess different properties of coordination. (2020-01-22)
POSTECH developed self-assembled artificial microtubule like LEGO building blocks
Professor Kimoon Kim and his research team identified a new hierarchical self-assembly mechanism (2020-01-16)
How cells assemble their skeleton
Microtubules, filamentous structures within the cell, are required for many important processes, including cell division and intracellular transport. (2020-01-15)
Researchers unlock secrets of cell division, define role for protein elevated in cancer
Researchers at Princeton University have successfully recreated a key process involved in cell division in a test tube, uncovering the vital role played by a protein that is elevated in over 25% of all cancers. (2020-01-14)
Cytoskeletal proteins play maintenance roles in neurotransmission
Researchers in the Cellular and Molecular Synaptic Function Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have elucidated the roles of cytoskeletal proteins at the giant presynaptic terminal, called the calyx of Held, visualized in rat brainstem slices. (2019-12-24)
Computer model described the dynamic instability of microtubules
Researchers of Sechenov University together with their colleagues from several Russian institutes studied the dynamics of microtubules that form the basis of the cytoskeleton and take part in the transfer of particles within a cell and its division. (2019-11-19)
Protein movement in cells hints at greater mysteries
A new imaging technique that makes it possible to match motor proteins with the cargo they carry within a cell is upending a standard view of how cellular traffic reaches the correct destination. (2019-10-23)
Physics: DNA-PAINT super-resolution microscopy at speed
Optimized DNA sequences allow for 10-times faster image acquisition in DNA-PAINT. (2019-10-11)
A simple way to control swarming molecular machines
The swarming behavior of about 100 million molecular machines can be controlled by applying simple mechanical stimuli such as extension and contraction. (2019-10-08)
Cancer tumours form surprising connections with healthy brain cells
Anti-epileptic medicine can curb the dangerous communication and possibly be part of future treatment. (2019-09-27)
Stabilizing neuronal branching for healthy brain circuitry
Novel molecular mechanism may regulate microtubule stability, important for neuronal branching and potentially for nerve regeneration. (2019-09-18)
How microtubules branch in new directions, a first look in animals
Cell biologist Thomas Maresca and senior research fellow Vikash Verma at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say they have, for the first time, directly observed and recorded in animal cells a pathway called branching microtubule nucleation, a mechanism in cell division that had been imaged in cellular extracts and plant cells but not directly observed in animal cells. (2019-09-13)
Mystery solved about the machines that move your genes
Researchers have discovered how the chromosome-dividing spindle avoids slowdowns: congestion. (2019-09-02)
Pancreatic cancer: Less toxic, more enduring drug may improve therapy
A new drug that penetrates the protective barrier around pancreatic cancers and accumulates in malignant cells may improve current chemotherapy, a study in mice suggests. (2019-08-08)
Reverse engineering the fireworks of life
An interdisciplinary team of Princeton researchers has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching. (2019-08-02)
Living components
Programmable structural dynamics successful for first time in self-organizing fiber structures (2019-07-22)
CNIO researchers find a method to select for mammalian cells with half the number of chromosomes
Since the emergence of molecular genetics, scientists have tried to isolate haploid mammalian cells. (2019-07-16)
Robert Alfano team identifies new 'Majorana Photons'
Hailed as a pioneer by Photonics Media for his previous discoveries of supercontinuum and Cr tunable lasers, City College of New York Distinguished Professor of Science and Engineering Robert R. (2019-07-15)
Marathon-running molecule could speed up the race for new neurological treatments
Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered a new process that sets the fastest molecular motor on its marathon-like runs through our neurons. (2019-07-12)
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