Current Milk News and Events

Current Milk News and Events, Milk News Articles.
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New Fred Hutch-led trial shows no benefits of dairy foods for blood sugar regulation
Results from a new trial published by a team led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center suggests lower dairy intake may be beneficial for people with metabolic syndrome. (2020-11-16)

Chemicals in your living room cause diabetes
A new UC Riverside study shows flame retardants found in nearly every American home cause mice to give birth to offspring that become diabetic. (2020-11-10)

Follow your gut: How farms protect from childhood asthma
Asthma impacts millions of children already at a young age. Children growing up on a farm have a lower risk of developing asthma than children not living on a farm. The mechanisms behind this protective farm effect on childhood asthma are largely unknown. A group of researchers from Helmholtz Zentrum M├╝nchen and the Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital of Ludwig Maximilians University Munich (LMU) clarified how the children's gut microbiome is involved in the protection process. (2020-11-02)

Neanderthal children grew and were weaned similar to us
From the analysis of three milk teeth belonging to Neanderthal children who lived between 70,000 and 45,000 years ago in Northeastern Italy, it emerges that their growth rate was very similar to ours: the discovery leads to exclude that late weaning could be among the causes that led to the disappearance of this human species (2020-11-02)

Waiter! This soup is not fly
Black Soldier Fly larvae contains more zinc and iron than lean meat and its calcium content is higher than milk. Less than half a hectare of black soldier fly larvae can produce more protein than cattle grazing on around 1200 hectares, or 52 hectares of soybeans. New research has identified the barriers for introducing fly protein into Western human diets as a sustainable, healthy alternative to both meat and plant proteins. (2020-10-28)

Genetic analysis of B. infantis strains reveal functional superiority of activated EVC001 in infants
When it comes to infant probiotics the strain matters. The genetic analysis of a key infant gut bacteria B. infantis, reveals superiority of activated EVC001 strain to provide health benefits to babies. (2020-10-27)

Best practices for COVID-19-positive or exposed mothers--breastfeeding and pumping milk
This Patient Page offers breastfeeding and pumping milk guidelines for mothers who have tested positive for COVID-19, who have been exposed to COVID-19 or work in a setting with increased risk of exposure to the virus. (2020-10-26)

Strategic interventions in dairy production in developing countries can help meet growing global demand for milk
Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Livestock Systems hosted the ''MILK Symposium: Improving Milk Production, Quality, and Safety in Developing Countries'' at the 2019 American Dairy Science Association® Annual Meeting to address factors that cause low dairy consumption in low- and middle-income countries and discuss strategies to address them. The Journal of Dairy Science invited speakers to submit articles on topics from the symposium to reach a wider audience. (2020-10-15)

Consistent nursing care after childbirth boosts breastfeeding rates
New parents who receive attentive, supportive nursing care during labor and immediately after childbirth are more likely to exclusively breastfeed their newborn when leaving the hospital, finds a study published in MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. (2020-10-15)

Very low risk to newborns from moms with COVID-19, finds study
Moms with COVID-19 who take basic precautions rarely pass the virus to their newborns, even if breastfeeding and rooming together, finds a new study at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and NewYork-Presbyterian. (2020-10-12)

Invisible threat: Listeria in smoked fish
Fish should be a regular component of our diets. It is an important source of biologically high-quality and easily digestible protein, minerals and vitamins. However, raw, smoked and cured fish products also often contain pathogenic germs, notably listeria. People can become infected by eating contaminated food and become ill with listeriosis. (2020-10-07)

Simple sugar possible therapy for repairing myelin in multiple sclerosis
N-acetylglucosamine, a simple sugar found in human breast milk and sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement in the United States, promotes myelin repair in mouse models and correlates with myelination levels in multiple sclerosis patients according to a new University of California, Irvine-led study. (2020-10-07)

Sugary beverages consumed while breastfeeding affects cognitive development in children
New research shows that a high sugar diet during the breastfeeding period can impact developmental outcomes during infancy. (2020-10-06)

Surgery for benign breast disease does not impair future breastfeeding capability
Young women with benign breast conditions may undergo surgery without jeopardizing their ability to breastfeed later on. (2020-10-03)

"New" lactic acid bacteria can make African camel milk safe
A research project headed by the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, has come up with the formula for a freeze-dried starter culture that African camel milk farmers can use to make safe, fermented milk products. (2020-09-22)

SUTD researchers develop simple method to 3D print milk products
Additive free, multimaterial 3D printing is achieved for milk-based products without temperature control (2020-09-18)

A 48,000 years old tooth that belonged to one of the last Neanderthals in Northern Italy
A child between 11 and 12 years of age lost it near the ''Riparo del Broion'' on the Berici Hills in Veneto. It is the most recent Neanderthal finding in northern Italy and one of the youngest in the country (2020-09-17)

Study reveals lactose tolerance happened quickly in Europe
A new study published in Current Biology reveals that the ability for humans to digest milk (lactase persistence) spread through Central Europe quickly in evolutionary terms. (2020-09-03)

Lactose tolerance spread throughout Europe in only a few thousand years
The human ability to digest the milk sugar lactose after infancy spread throughout Central Europe in only a few thousand years. This is the conclusion reached by an international research team led by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. The researchers analyzed genetic material from the bones of individuals who had fallen in a conflict around 1200 B.C. on the banks of the Tollense, a river in present-day Germany, and report their findings in Current Biology this week. (2020-09-03)

Antibiotics affect breast milk microbiota in mothers of preterm infants: University of Toronto study
A team led by researchers at the University of Toronto and The Hospital for Sick Children has found that mothers of preterm babies have highly individual breast milk microbiomes, and that even short courses of antibiotics have prolonged effects on the diversity and abundance of microbes in their milk. (2020-09-03)

Study tracks human milk nutrients in infant microbiome
A new study in mice helps explain why gut microbiomes of breastfed infants can differ greatly from those of formula-fed infants. (2020-09-01)

The "gold" in breast milk
Breast milk strengthens a child's immune system, supporting the intestinal flora. These facts are common knowledge. But how does this work? What are the molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon? And why is this not possible the same way with bottle feeding? The reasons were unknown until a team from the RESIST Cluster of Excellence at Hannover Medical School (MHH) recently discovered how alarmins are that mechanism in a project involving the University of Bonn. (2020-08-28)

Legacy
Breastfeeding secures delivery of sugar and fat for milk production by changing the insulin sensitivity of organs that supply or demand these nutrients, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The findings, published in this month's print issue of Diabetes, could explain how different tissues cooperate to start and maintain lactation and offer strategies to help improve breastfeeding success for mothers who have insufficient milk production. (2020-08-25)

COVID-19 human milk studies should continue without stopping breastfeeding
It is not easy to conduct human milk research during a pandemic. Yet despite the consistent lack of quality evidence for transmission of viral RNA from breast milk, some leaders are pushing ahead by altering public health and clinical practice guidance, according to E.A. Quinn, associate professor of biological anthropology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. (2020-08-25)

Crossbreeding of Holstein cows improves fertility without detriment to milk production
Genetic selection programs in the United States and elsewhere have emphasized milk production at the expense of other traits. Attention has turned to improving these neglected traits for better overall well-being of cows and to ameliorate dairy producers' profitability. In a recent article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from the University of Minnesota examined the effects of crossbreeding on fertility and milk production across three generations in a large sample of Holstein and crossbred cows. (2020-08-24)

Is COVID-19 transmitted through breast milk? Study suggests not likely
A recent study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggests transmission of COVID-19 through breast milk is not likely. The infectious virus was not detected in 64 samples of breast milk tested. (2020-08-19)

High fructose diet in pregnancy impacts metabolism of offspring, study finds
An increased level of fructose intake during pregnancy can cause significant changes in maternal metabolic function and milk composition and alter the metabolism of their offspring, researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington, have found. (2020-08-18)

Decline in milk consumption by children in school lunch programs may affect future health
Fluid milk consumption among children is vital, as adequate consumption of dairy products, especially during childhood, has beneficial health outcomes later in life. These benefits include reduced risk of osteoporosis, hypertension, obesity, and cancer in adulthood. Milk consumption among children has been declining for decades, so understanding and fulfilling the needs of children is crucial to reverse the decline. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists studied key contributors to increasing milk consumption among children. (2020-08-18)

More healthful milk chocolate by adding peanut, coffee waste
Milk chocolate is a consumer favorite worldwide, prized for its sweet flavor and creamy texture. In contrast, dark chocolate has high levels of phenolic compounds, which can provide antioxidant health benefits, but is less popular. Today, researchers report a new way to combine milk chocolate with waste peanut skins and other wastes to boost its antioxidant properties. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo. (2020-08-17)

Poor hygiene is significant risk for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria colonization
Scientists have found clear indicators for how the interaction of poor hygiene and antibiotic use contribute to the colonization of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacteria in humans, a problem that contributes to hundreds of thousands of deaths annually. (2020-08-14)

Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies
More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. 'Preemies' can be severely underweight babies and struggle to get the nutrients they need from breast milk alone, so neonatal intensive care units provide an additional milk fortifier, either in the form of cow's milk or manufactured from donor breast milk, to keep them healthy. (2020-08-12)

Pasteurization inactivates COVID-19 virus in human milk: new research
A new study has confirmed what researchers already suspected to be the case: heat inactivates SARS-CoV-2 in human milk. (2020-08-10)

New guidelines say breastfeeding is safe after anaesthesia
New guidelines published by the Association of Anaesthetists in the journal Anaesthesia, to coincide with the start of World Breast Feeding Week (1-7 August) say that breastfeeding is safe after the mother has had anaesthesia, as soon as she is alert and able to feed. (2020-07-31)

Plastics, pathogens and baby formula: What's in your shellfish?
The first landmark study using next-generation technology to comprehensively examine contaminants in oysters in Myanmar reveals alarming findings: the widespread presence of human bacterial pathogens and human-derived microdebris materials, including plastics, kerosene, paint, talc and milk supplement powders. (2020-07-30)

NIST expands database that helps identify unknown compounds in milk
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have recently doubled the size of a reference library that includes examples of a certain type of carbohydrate found in milk from humans and several other animals. The expansion of the library will help scientists identify the unknown compounds in their own milk samples. The researchers published their new findings in Analytical Chemistry. (2020-07-27)

Correct dosage of methane-inhibiting additive in dairy cow feed shown in study
The optimum amount of a methane-inhibiting supplement in dairy cattle feed has been determined by an international team of researchers, indicating that widespread use of the compound could be an affordable climate change-battling strategy, if farmers embrace it. (2020-07-23)

Mitigation of greenhouse gases in dairy cattle through genetic selection
Researchers in Spain propose mitigating methane production by dairy cattle through breeding. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists are targeting reduction of enteric methane in the breeding objectives for dairy cattle to select for animals that use feed more efficiently and thus produce less methane. Because livestock farming contributes 13 percent of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, selective breeding can reduce those emissions while increasing milk output. (2020-07-22)

First in-depth insights into parturition in rhinos
Scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research together with zoo veterinarians closely monitored 19 pregnant white rhinos in six European zoos and recorded timelines for pre-birth development, milk production, hormone levels, gestation length and documented the onset of parturition, different stages of labour and foetal position at birth. These data significantly improves the knowledge base for birth management and obstetrics in rhinos. (2020-07-20)

Cheese making relies on milk proteins to form structure
Cheese production relies on coagulation of milk proteins into a gel matrix after addition of rennet. Milk that does not coagulate (NC) under optimal conditions affects the manufacturing process, requiring a longer processing time and lowering the cheese yield, which, in turn, has economic impact. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from Lund University studied the protein composition of milk samples with different coagulation properties to learn more about why only some milk coagulates with rennet. (2020-07-20)

Heat stress in gestating dairy cows impairs performance of future generations
In a recent article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from the University of Florida and the University of California, Davis investigated the performance and profitability of two future generations of cows born to mothers exposed to heat stress during pregnancy. (2020-07-16)

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