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Current Mitochondria News and Events

Current Mitochondria News and Events, Mitochondria News Articles.
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Study: Phenols in cocoa bean shells may reverse obesity-related problems in mouse cells
A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois suggests that three of the phenolic compounds in cocoa bean shells have powerful effects on the fat and immune cells in mice, potentially reversing the chronic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity. (2019-06-20)
SPbU scientists have discovered the first family of extracellular Rickettsia-like bacteria
Microbiologists of St Petersburg University, together with researchers from the University of Milan, the University of Pisa, and the University of Pavia, have discovered a new family of bacteria belonging to the order Rickettsiales -- Deianiraeaceae. (2019-06-14)
SIRT1 plays key role in chronic myeloid leukemia to aid persistence of leukemic stem cells
Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia are treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. (2019-06-10)
Worm study sparks hope for slowing muscle decline
Muscle decline caused by ageing and certain diseases could be dramatically slowed by stopping a chain reaction that damages cells, new research shows. (2019-06-07)
Astrocytes protect neurons from toxic buildup
Neurons off-load toxic by-products to astrocytes, which process and recycle them. (2019-05-31)
Circadian clock and fat metabolism linked through newly discovered mechanism
Princeton University researchers found that the enzyme Nocturnin, known for its role in fat metabolism and circadian rhythm, acts on two well-established molecules in metabolism. (2019-05-30)
Dissolving protein traffic jam at the entrance of mitochondria
Researchers from Freiburg discovered a novel mechanism that ensures obstacle-free protein traffic into the powerhouse of the cell. (2019-05-23)
Interplay between mitochondria and nucleus may have implications for new treatment
Mitochondria, the 'batteries' that produce our energy, interact with the cell's nucleus in subtle ways previously unseen in humans, according to research published today in the journal Science. (2019-05-23)
Researchers link new protein to Parkinson's
Cells depend on a protein called Parkin, which is mutated in some forms of Parkinson's disease, to get rid of damaged mitochondria. (2019-05-20)
Miro2 is a Parkin receptor for selective removal of damaged mitochondria
Defects in mitophagy are linked to a variety of human diseases including Parkinson's and cardiac disorders. (2019-05-16)
Membrane madness: The ins and outs of moving materials through the cell
The cell membrane is a fatty layer that forms a border between the inside of the cell, its various structures and the outside world. (2019-05-15)
How egg cells choose their best powerhouses to pass on
Developing egg cells conduct tests to select the healthiest of their energy-making machines to be passed to the next generation. (2019-05-15)
Neurodevelopmental disorders may be rooted in genetics and mitochondrial deficits
A new study published in Neuron provides the first evidence showing that individual nerve cells fail to make the right number of connections. (2019-05-09)
A link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosis
In healthy people, a tightly controlled process balances out the activity of osteoblasts, which build bone, and osteoclasts, which break it down. (2019-05-09)
Serotonin boosts neuronal powerplants protecting against stress
Research from the Vaidya and Kolthur-Seetharam groups (TIFR) shows that the neurotransmitter serotonin enhances the production and functions of neuronal mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, and protect against stress. (2019-05-09)
Intelligence can link to health and aging
For over 100 years, scientists have sought to understand what links a person's general intelligence, health and aging. (2019-05-08)
Untangling a cancer signaling network suggests new roadmap to tumor control
In this advanced age of molecular sleuthing, a research team led by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center have findings that suggest tumors will eventually become resistant to drug inhibitors of a common cancer pathway (dubbed YAP/TAZ), now in preclinical development. (2019-05-06)
New cancer therapy target found in mitochondria for potential treatment of blood cancers
A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center identified a new therapeutic target in cancer cells and explains how new anti-cancer drugs called imipridones work by inducing cancer cell death in blood cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and mantle cell lymphoma. (2019-05-02)
Veritable powerhouses -- even without DNA
The cells of most life forms contain mitochondria for energy production. (2019-04-24)
Simple sea anemones not so simple after all
New research on tube anemones is challenging everything that evolutionary biologists thought they knew about sea animal genetics. (2019-04-23)
Hole-forming protein may suppress tumor growth
A gene called gasdermin E, which is downregulated in many cancers, aids cells in dying in an unexpected way, and may also suppress tumor growth. (2019-04-22)
Broken mitochondria use 'eat me' proteins to summon their executioners
When mitochondria become damaged, they avoid causing further problems by signaling cellular proteins to degrade them. (2019-04-11)
NASA Twins Study includes San Antonio multiomics center
The NASA Twins Study compares the health of identical twin astronauts, one who spent a year in spaceflight while the other remained on Earth. (2019-04-11)
In mice, eliminating damaged mitochondria alleviates chronic inflammatory disease
Treatment with a choline kinase inhibitor prompts immune cells to clear away damaged mitochondria, thus reducing NLRP3 inflammasome activation and preventing inflammation. (2019-04-11)
Cell death may be triggered by 'hit-and-run' interaction
A 'hit-and-run' interaction between two proteins could be an important trigger for cell death, according to new research from Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers. (2019-04-09)
Half-hearted: New insight into why the heart doesn't develop properly in some children
Investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina have found evidence that the gene Ccdc117 supports the rapid growth of precursor cells needed for proper development of right-sided heart structures. (2019-04-09)
Study: Protein key to charcot-marie-tooth, other nerve diseases
A new study provides critical insight into a little-known, yet relatively common, inherited neurological condition called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. (2019-04-04)
Spinning-prism microscope helps gather stem cells for regenerative medicine
Pluripotent stem cells are crucial to regenerative medicine, but better screening methods are needed to isolate safe and effective cells for medical use. (2019-03-27)
Obese mouse mothers trigger heart problems in offspring
Mitochondria manufacture energy in every cell of the body, including heart muscle cells. (2019-03-22)
Mount Sinai and IBM researchers uncover key to greater efficacy in cancer treatment
Researchers from Mount Sinai and IBM reveal that the number of mitochondria in a cell is, in great part, associated with how the cancer responds to drug therapy. (2019-03-21)
Androgen receptor, treatment target for prostate cancer, imports into mitochondria
Androgens stimulate prostate cancer cells to grow. Many drugs to target that cancer focus on stopping androgen biosynthesis or blocking the androgen receptor, or AR. (2019-03-19)
How a mitochondrial enzyme can trigger cell death
Cytochrome c is a small enzyme that plays an important role in the production of energy by mitochondria. (2019-03-14)
Gene behind long-recognized mitochondrial disease has highly varied effects
Mutations in the mitochondrial gene mt-ATP6, which encodes an essential part of the mitochondrial motor known as ATP synthase that generates cellular energy, are much more variable than previously thought. (2019-03-12)
Researchers create SAMĪ²A, a new molecule to treat heart failure
This innovation has been developed by researchers based in Brazil and the US. (2019-03-12)
Parkinson's treatment delivers a power-up to brain cell 'batteries'
Scientists have gained clues into how a Parkinson's disease treatment, called deep brain stimulation, helps tackle symptoms. (2019-03-12)
Vitamin B3 analogue boosts production of blood cells
Scientists from EPFL and the UNIL/Ludwig Cancer Research have found that supplementing diet with nicotinamide riboside, an analogue of vitamin B3, boosts the production of blood cells by improving the function of their stem cells. (2019-03-07)
Cell editors correct genetic errors
Almost all land plants employ an army of editors who correct errors in their genetic information. (2019-03-01)
Better together: Mitochondrial fusion supports cell division
New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that when cells divide rapidly, their mitochondria are fused together. (2019-02-26)
Pioneering study could offer protection to patients with rare genetic disease
Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a healthy population, according to new research from the University of Bath. (2019-02-21)
WVU researcher explores what tumor cells and a healthy retina have in common
West Virginia University researcher Jianhai Du is parsing how the retina hijacks an energy-producing chemical reaction to churn out molecular building blocks to renew photoreceptor membranes that keep our vision sharp. (2019-02-21)
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