Current Molecular biology News and Events

Current Molecular biology News and Events, Molecular biology News Articles.
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Treatment shows reduction in heart failure after myocardial infarction
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine identified potential preventative therapies for heart failure after a significant heart attack. (2020-11-24)

Sestrin makes fruit flies live longer
Researchers identify positive effector behind reduced food intake. (2020-11-24)

Study reveals true origin of oldest evidence of animals
Two teams of scientists have resolved a longstanding controversy surrounding the origins of complex life on Earth. The joint studies found molecular fossils extracted from 635-million-year-old rocks aren't the earliest evidence of animals, but instead common algae. (2020-11-23)

Discovery illuminates how cell growth pathway responds to signals
A basic science discovery by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health reveals a fundamental way cells interpret signals from their environment and may eventually pave the way for potential new therapies. (2020-11-20)

Genetic code evolution and Darwin's evolution theory should consider DNA an 'energy code'
Darwin's theory of evolution should be expanded to include consideration of a DNA stability ''energy code'' - so-called ''molecular Darwinism'' - to further account for the long-term survival of species' characteristics on Earth, according to Rutgers scientists. (2020-11-16)

Circular RNA regulates neuronal differentiation by scaffolding an inhibitory transcription complex
In a screening for a functional impact to the neuronal differentiation process, Danish researchers identified a specific circular RNA, circZNF827, which surprisingly 'taps the brake' on neurogenesis. The results provide an interesting example of co-evolution of a circRNA, and its host-encoded protein product, that regulate each other's function, to directly impact the fundamental process of neurogenesis. (2020-11-13)

How molecular chaperones dissolve protein aggregates linked to Parkinson's disease
In many neurodegenerative diseases, proteins clump in the brain, forming so-called amyloid fibrils. Yet there exists a cellular defence mechanism that counteracts this process and even dissolves fibrils already formed. The mechanism is based on the activity of molecular helpers, so-called chaperones of the heat shock protein 70 family. Heidelberg researchers studied how the Hsp70 system disaggregates fibrils of the Parkinson-specific protein α-synuclein in a test tube. (2020-11-11)

A molecule from gut bacteria reduces effect of diabetes medication
The action of metformin, the classic drug used to treat diabetes by stabilizing blood sugar, can be blocked by a molecule from the bacteria in our intestines, a University of Gothenburg study shows. (2020-11-11)

Changes in subcellular traffic increase invasiveness of radioresistant cancer cells
Scientists have revealed the molecular mechanism regulating the trafficking of lysosomes that increases the invasiveness of radioresistant cancer cells following radiotherapy. (2020-10-29)

How octopus suckers "taste by touch"
Imagine if you could taste something simply by touching it. Octopuses can do just that with their unique ''touch-taste'' sense, made possible by the suction-cup-like suckers along each of their eight arms. Now, researchers reporting October 29 in the journal Cell have new evidence as to how this sensory ability works. The findings help to explain how octopuses, and perhaps other marine organisms, explore the seafloor by tasting objects underwater with a simple touch. (2020-10-29)

Yeast study yields insights into longstanding evolution debate
In a study published Oct. 27 in the journal Cell Reports, Yale scientists show how epigenetic mechanisms contribute in real time to the evolution of a gene network in yeast. Specifically, through multiple generations yeast cells were found to pass on changes in gene activity induced by researchers. (2020-10-27)

High fat or 'ketogenic' diets could prevent, reverse heart failure
Research from Saint Louis University finds that high fat or ''ketogenic'' diets could completely prevent, or even reverse heart failure caused by a metabolic process. The research team, led by Kyle S. McCommis, Ph.D., assistant professor in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at SLU, looked at a metabolic process that seems to be turned down in failing human hearts. (2020-10-26)

Happiness and the evolution of brain size
Serotonin can act as a growth factor for the stem cells in the fetal human brain that determine brain size. (2020-10-23)

Oregon researchers reveal why heat stress damages sperm
University of Oregon biologists have used the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to identify molecular mechanisms that produce DNA damage in sperm and contribute to male infertility following exposure to heat. (2020-10-22)

How some sea slugs keep their ability to carry out plant-like photosynthesis
Scientists have shed new light on a relationship between a sea slug and tiny structures called chloroplasts from their food algae that allow the animals to photosynthesise in a similar way to plants. (2020-10-20)

An integrated approach to ultrasound imaging in medicine and biology
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this editorial, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Pingtong Huang considers an integrated approach to ultrasound imaging in medicine and biology. (2020-10-19)

Research demonstrates a molecular dance that keeps your heart beating
New research demonstrates a molecular dance that keeps your heart beating. The findings could someday lead to improved diagnostics and medical treatments for serious and sometimes devastating hereditary heart conditions. (2020-10-14)

NYUAD study finds key protein related to the disease-causing malformation of fat tissue
A team of researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD), led by Associate Professor of Biology Piergiorgio Percipalle in collaboration with Research Assistant Professor Mohamed Al-Sayegh, recently studied the molecular basis of adipogenesis and discovered that the protein actin (a specific variant referred to as β-actin) has an important role in activating the genes which need to be expressed in order to create fat tissue. (2020-10-14)

How deadly parasites 'glide' into human cells
A group of scientists led by EMBL Hamburg's Christian Löw provide insights into the molecular structure of proteins involved in the gliding movements through which the parasites causing malaria and toxoplasmosis invade human cells. (2020-10-13)

Scientists shed new light on mechanisms of malaria parasite motility
New insight on the molecular mechanisms that allow malaria parasites to move and spread disease within their hosts has been published today in the open-access eLife journal. (2020-10-13)

Osteoarthritis biomarker could help 300 million people worldwide
University of South Australia researchers are a step closer to finding a new biomarker for osteoarthritis, a painful condition which affects more than 300 million people worldwide. (2020-10-11)

Chromosome defects seen from over-exchange of DNA in sperm and eggs
The exchange of DNA between chromosomes during the early formation of sperm and egg cells normally is limited to assure fertility. But when there are too many of these genetic exchanges, called crossover events, the segregation of chromosomes into eggs is flawed, say biologists who combined on a basic science project done across three labs at the University of Oregon and Northwestern University. (2020-10-07)

Dozens of mammals could be susceptible to SARS-CoV-2
Numerous animals may be vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, according to a large study modelling how the virus might infect different animals' cells, led by UCL researchers, published in Scientific Reports. (2020-10-05)

Hidden DNA fragment the 'trigger switch' for male development
Biology textbooks may need to be re-written, with scientists finding a new piece of DNA essential to forming male sex organs in mice. (2020-10-02)

NUS researchers solve decades-old problem of how to uniformly switch memristors
An international team, led by the scientists from the National University of Singapore, has developed a solution to uniformly switch memristors. This innovation addresses a long-standing problem in the field of organic and molecular electronics. (2020-09-29)

Virus turns deadly fungus from foe to friend in plants
Researchers have discovered that a fungal virus (also called a mycovirus) can convert deadly fungal pathogens into beneficial fungus in rapeseed plants. Once transformed, the fungus boosts the plant's immune system, making the plant healthier and more resistant to diseases. These findings, published on September 29 in the journal Molecular Plant, indicate that some fungal viruses can be used for developing ''plant vaccines'' to improve crop health and enhance crop yield. (2020-09-29)

Fine-tuning stem cell metabolism prevents hair loss
An international research team has shown in mice that Rictor, a protein that helps to regulate the growth, energy, and oxygen consumption of cells, plays a key role in the cellular metabolism and longevity of hair follicle stem cells / publication in 'Cell Metabolism' (2020-09-28)

Likely molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis are revealed by network biology
Researchers have built an interactome that includes the lung-epithelial cell host interactome integrated with a SARS-CoV-2 interactome. Applying network biology analysis tools to this human/SARS-CoV-2 interactome has revealed potential molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis for SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. The research identified 33 high-value SARS-CoV-2 therapeutic targets, which are possibly involved in viral entry, proliferation and survival to establish infection and facilitate disease progression. (2020-09-23)

Mining molecular data with cryo-EM unveils hidden biological secrets
In the new study, Abhishek Singharoy and his colleagues demonstrate that cryo-EM can be pushed to even greater extremes of clarity, by extracting precious information previously buried in the reams of cryo-EM data. (2020-09-22)

First look at how hallucinogens bind structurally to serotonin receptors
Although hallucinogenic drugs have been studied for decades, little is known about the underlying mechanisms in the brain by which they induce their effects. A paper publishing September 17 in the journal Cell reveals the first X-ray crystallography structure of LSD bound to its target in the brain, the serotonin receptor. The paper also includes the first cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a prototypical hallucinogen coupled with the entire serotonin receptor complex. (2020-09-17)

The intricate protein architecture linked to disease
In research published today in the journal Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, scientists at the University of Leeds report that they have been able to visualise the structure of amylin fibrils using the latest electron microscope technology - and have discovered an architecture that they suspect makes some amylin sequences more prone to form amylin aggregates than others: a feature linked to earlier onset of type 2 diabetes. (2020-09-14)

New molecule to repair and restore brain and spinal cord function
A molecule created by researchers can restore lost connections in the spinal cord and brain of mice with neurological disorders including cerebellar ataxia, Alzheimer's disease and spinal cord injury. The research, involving scientists in the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology (MRC LMB), in Cambridge, and collaborators from Japan and Germany, describes how the molecule repaired function in cells and in mouse models of diseases and injury. (2020-09-11)

Finding a handle to bag the right proteins
A method that lights up tags attached to selected proteins can help to purify the proteins from a mixed protein pool. (2020-09-09)

More than just genetic code
Researchers discover how messenger RNAs transport information to where photosynthesis takes place. (2020-09-08)

Plant protein discovery could reduce need for fertilizer
Researchers have discovered how a protein in plant roots controls the uptake of minerals and water, a finding which could improve the tolerance of agricultural crops to climate change and reduce the need for chemical fertilisers. (2020-09-04)

Cell division: Cleaning the nucleus without detergents
A team of researchers, spearheaded by the Gerlich lab at IMBA, has uncovered how cells remove unwanted components from the nucleus following mitosis. The results, published in the journal Nature, stem from a fruitful collaboration between the Gerlich lab and former IMBA Postdoc Sara Cuylen-Häring, who recently established her own group at EMBL. (2020-09-03)

Cellular roadmaps predict body's coronavirus vulnerability
New research from Cornell University developed potential roadmaps for how the coronavirus infects organs and identifies what molecular factors could help facilitate or restrict infection. (2020-09-03)

Start here to make a protein
Researchers at UC Davis and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, U.K. have solved the the structure of the complex formed when mRNA is being scanned to find the starting point for translating RNA into a protein. The discovery, published Sept. 4, 2020 in Science, provides new understanding of this fundamental process. (2020-09-03)

How do tumor cells divide in the crowd?
Scientists led by Dr. Elisabeth Fischer-Friedrich, group leader at the Excellence Cluster Physics of Life (PoL) and the Biotechnology Center TU Dresden (BIOTEC) studied how cancer cells are able to divide in a crowded tumor tissue and connected it to the hallmark of cancer progression and metastasis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). (2020-09-02)

Why naming neurons can help cure brain disease
A group of 74 scientists proposed the use of single-cell RNA sequencing as the skeleton for a unified classification of cortical neurons. The ''Copenhagen Classification'' came out of an international meeting on cortical neurons two years ago. (2020-09-02)

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