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Current Molecular motor News and Events

Current Molecular motor News and Events, Molecular motor News Articles.
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Success in promoting plant growth for biodiesel
Scientists of Waseda University in Japan succeeded in promoting plant growth and increasing seed yield by heterologous expression of protein from Arabidopsis (artificially modified high-speed motor protein) in Camelina sativa, which is expected as a useful plant for biodiesel. (2020-08-07)
Research suggests viability of brain computer to improve function in paralyzed patient
Researchers demonstrated the success of a fully implantable wireless medical device called a stentrode brain-computer interface designed to improve functional independence in patients with severe paralysis. (2020-08-06)
Training neural circuits early in development improves response, study finds
When it comes to training neural circuits for tissue engineering or biomedical applications, a new study suggests a key parameter: Train them young. (2020-08-06)
Mathematical modeling revealed how chitinase, a molecular monorail, obeys a one-way sign
A novel mathematical modeling method has been developed to estimate operation models of biomolecular motors from single-molecule imaging data of motion with the Bayesian inference framework. (2020-08-03)
Autism spectrum disorder can be predicted from health checkups at 18 months
An early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, a type of developmental disorder was found to be effective from routine health checkups of infants at 18 months of age. (2020-08-03)
Study reveals less connectivity between hey brain regions in people with FXTAS premutation
Investigators from the University of Kansas were able to identify brain processes specifically linked to sensorimotor issues in aging people with the FMR1 premutation. (2020-08-03)
Big brains and dexterous hands
Primates with large brains can master more complex hand movements than those with smaller brains. (2020-07-24)
Putting the spring-cam back into stroke patients steps
A research group has developed a new, lightweight and motor-less device that can be easily attached to an ankle support device - otherwise known as an ankle foot orthosis (AFO). (2020-07-22)
Making balanced decisions
How decisions are made and how behavior is controlled is one of the most important questions in neuroscience. (2020-07-15)
UMass Amherst team makes artificial energy source for muscle
Muscle physiologist Ned Debold and colleagues at UMass Amherst sought an alternative energy source to replace the body's usual one, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). (2020-07-13)
Gene yields insights into the causes of neurodegeneration
Cornell researchers including Fenghua Hu, associate professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and member of the Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, are taking a closer look at the factors that cause Alzheimer's, FTLD and similar diseases. (2020-07-09)
A novel therapeutic target for recovery after stroke
IBS researchers have discovered a new mechanism to explain the effects of subcortical strokes and a new possible therapeutic approach. (2020-07-07)
NYAUD researchers study effects of cellular crowding on the cell's transport system
In the recent study Macromolecular crowding acts as a physical regular of intracellular transport, published in the journal Nature Physics, lead researcher and Assistant Professor of Physics at NYU Abu Dhabi George Shubeita and his team present the findings that in a native cell environment, which is crowded with a high concentration of macromolecules, the crowding significantly impacts the speed of groups of motor proteins, but not singular motor proteins. (2020-07-06)
Optogenetic stimulation of the motor cortex successfully induced arm movements in monkeys
Optogenetics can control cellular functions by illuminating lights and revolutionized stimulation methods. (2020-07-03)
Brain activity prior to an action contributes to our sense of control over what we do
Scientists have identified specific brain regions that contribute to humans' sense of agency - the implicit sense that we control our actions and that they affect the outside world. (2020-07-01)
A data treasure for gait analysis
The St. Pölten UAS and the Austrian general accident insurance institution AUVA have made one of the biggest data records for automated gait analysis worldwide openly accessible. (2020-06-30)
Lifting weights makes your nervous system stronger, too
Gym-goers may get frustrated when they don't see results from weightlifting right away, but their efforts are not in vain: the first few weeks of training strengthen the nervous system, not muscles. (2020-06-29)
Researchers discover algorithms and neural circuit mechanisms of escape responses
Prof. WEN Quan from School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has proposed the algorithms and circuit mechanisms for the robust and flexible motor states of nematodes during escape responses. (2020-06-28)
The tug-of-war at the heart of cellular symmetry
Researchers develop an artificial cell that brings to light the dynamics that govern each cell's internal symmetry. (2020-06-25)
Synaptic variability provides adaptability for rhythmic motor pattern
From snail to man, one of the most common features in behavior is arguably the variability of motor acts--for example, a soccer player evading an opponent. (2020-06-19)
Researchers create a photographic film of a molecular switch
Molecular switches are the molecular counterparts of electrical switches and play an important role in many processes in nature. (2020-06-18)
Simple blood test could one day diagnose motor neurone disease
Scientists at the University of Sussex have identified a potential pattern within blood which signals the presence of motor neuron disease; a discovery which could significantly improve diagnosis. (2020-06-17)
Yale scientists propose explanation for baffling form of childhood OCD
Yale scientists may have found a cause for the sudden onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in some children, they report. (2020-06-16)
Working in the sun -- heating of the head may markedly affect safety and performance
Prolonged exposure of the head to strong sunlight significantly impairs cognitively dominated functions and coordination of complex motor tasks shows a new study from the Heat-Shield project coordinated by researchers from Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at University of Copenhagen. (2020-06-16)
The smallest motor in the world
A research team from Empa and EPFL has developed a molecular motor which consists of only 16 atoms and rotates reliably in one direction. (2020-06-16)
AI reduces 'communication gap' for nonverbal people by as much as half
Researchers have used artificial intelligence to reduce the 'communication gap' for nonverbal people with motor disabilities who rely on computers to converse with others. (2020-06-15)
Dopamine signaling allows neural circuits to generate coordinated behaviors
As part of the study, the MIT research team invented a new open-source microscopy platform complete with a parts list and online instructions for other labs to build their own. (2020-06-11)
Treat early or wait? Experts ponder best way to manage milder forms of spinal muscular atrophy
The advent of therapeutic interventions for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has increased the importance of presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment. (2020-06-11)
Protecting the neuronal architecture
Protecting nerve cells from losing their characteristic extensions, the dendrites, can reduce brain damage after a stroke. (2020-06-05)
Cannabis in Michigan: New report documents trends before recreational legalization
Nearly twelve years ago, Michigan voters approved the use of medical cannabis by residents with certain health conditions. (2020-06-04)
Squid studies illuminate neural dysfunction in ALS; suggest new route to therapy
Yuyu Song of Harvard Medical School was a Grass Fellow at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) when she took advantage of a powerful research organism in neuroscience, the local squid, to start asking how a mutant protein associated with familial ALS behaves under controlled conditions. (2020-06-01)
Restoring nerve-muscle communication in ALS
A new study finds that restoring the protein SV2 in a genetic form of ALS can correct abnormalities in transmission and even prevent cells from dying, providing a new target for future therapies. (2020-05-28)
Children's temperament traits affect their motor skills
A recent study among 3- to 7-year-old children showed that children's motor skills benefitted if a child was older and participated in organised sports. (2020-05-27)
Molecular pair offers potential for Parkinson's treatment, finds NTU Singapore-Harvard study
A promising molecular pair has offered hope that could lead to the development of a new treatment to slow down Parkinson's disease, a study by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Harvard University has found. (2020-05-27)
Similar to humans, chimpanzees develop slowly
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have systematically investigated developmental milestones in wild chimpanzees of the Taï National Park (Ivory Coast) and found that they develop slowly, requiring more than five years to reach key motor, communication and social milestones. (2020-05-26)
Mechanism behind upper motor degeneration revealed
Scientists have pinpointed the electrophysiological mechanism behind upper motor neuron disease, unlocking the door to potential treatments for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia and Primary Lateral Sclerosis. (2020-05-21)
IASLC survey: Molecular testing rates in most countries less than 50 percent
Access to targeted therapies for lung cancer depends on accurate identification of patients' biomarkers through molecular testing, but survey results published today in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology suggest that many international clinicians are unaware of evidence-based guidelines that support the use of molecular testing. (2020-05-20)
CU researchers publish study on nerve cell repair in Nature Neuroscience
Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have identified a new way that cells in the central nervous system regenerate and repair following damage. (2020-05-18)
Significant differences exist among neurons expressing dopamine receptors
An international collaboration, which included the involvement of the research team from the Institut de Neurociències of the UAB (INC-UAB), has shown that neurons expressing dopamine D2 receptors have different molecular features and functions, depending on their anatomical localization within the striatum. (2020-05-13)
Researchers find the 'brain's steering wheel' in the brainstem of mice
In a new study in mice, neuroscientists from the University of Copenhagen have found neurons in the brain that control how the mice turn right and left. (2020-05-12)
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