Current Mosquitoes News and Events

Current Mosquitoes News and Events, Mosquitoes News Articles.
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'Domestication' increases mosquito's zika virus susceptibility
The Aedes aegypti aegypti subspecies of mosquito, which has become a ''domestic'' pest worldwide, can acquire and transmit Zika virus more easily than its African forerunner. (2020-11-19)

Lethal brain infections in mice thwarted by decoy molecule
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a molecule that protects mice from brain infections caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a mosquito-borne virus notorious for causing fast-spreading, deadly outbreaks in Mexico, Central America and northern South America. (2020-11-18)

Young asymptomatic 'super spreaders' keep malaria viable by infecting local mosquitoes
The new findings, reported today at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH), reveal a hidden reservoir that's a barrier to long-term efforts to eliminate malaria and an immediate threat for disease resurgence if control measures like bednets and indoor spraying falter. (2020-11-18)

Buffalo fly faces Dengue nemesis
Australian beef cattle researchers trial the use of insect-infecting bacterium Wolbachia to tackle buffalo fly, a major blood-sucking pest that costs the industry $100 million a year in treatments and lost production. (2020-11-03)

UC researchers pioneer more effective way to block malaria transmission in mosquitoes
Employing a strategy known as 'population modification,' which involves using a CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive system to introduce genes preventing parasite transmission into mosquito chromosomes, University of California researchers have made a major advance in the use of genetic technologies to control the transmission of malaria parasites. (2020-11-03)

Malaria parasites adapt to survive the dry season, research shows
The main parasite that causes malaria can alter its gene expression to survive undetected in the human blood stream, new research has shown. (2020-10-30)

Salt-based mosquito-control products are ineffective, study shows
A new study by a bevy of expert mosquito researchers offers an important warning to consumers: Products claiming to reduce mosquito populations with salt-water solutions are ineffective. In a series of lab tests using nine mosquito species, researchers found no evidence that adult mosquitoes are killed by salt ingested at concentrations used in several popular mosquito-control products. The findings are reported in the Journal of Medical Entomology. (2020-10-20)

Light pollution may increase biting behavior at night in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes
Artificial light abnormally increases mosquito biting behavior at night in a species that typically prefers to bite people during the day, according to research from the University of Notre Dame that was published in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (2020-10-20)

AJTMH tip sheet for October 2020
Your advance look at two new studies publishing online on October 15, 2020 in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. (2020-10-15)

Mosquitoes' taste for blood traced to four types of neurons
The female mosquito has an amazing ability to detect blood using her syringe-like ''tongue.'' Now scientists have identified the neurons that give her blood-seeking powers. (2020-10-12)

Chemists create new crystal form of insecticide, boosting its ability to fight mosquitoes and malaria
Through a simple process of heating and cooling, New York University researchers have created a new crystal form of deltamethrin -- a common insecticide used to control malaria -- resulting in an insecticide that is up to 12 times more effective against mosquitoes than the existing form. (2020-10-12)

Scientists discover mosquitoes' unique blood-taste detectors
Scientists aren't sure how mosquitoes sense taste of blood, or how they know that this, of all things, is something to gorge on. Nothing else, not even sweet nectar, makes them pump as ferociously as when they're draining our veins. New research identifies a unique group of neurons that don't care about simple tastes like sweet or salty. Rather, they activate only when sugar, salt, and other components of blood are all present at once. (2020-10-12)

Solving global challenges using insect research
IRD researchers and their partners have published a special issue in the Current Opinion in Insect Science journal. Using an interdisciplinary approach and based on examples from international research, they explain how insects can contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) identified by the United Nations for 2030. (2020-10-02)

Mosquitos lost an essential gene with no ill effects
University of Maryland scientists discovered mosquitos are missing a gene that's critical for survival in other insects. Alys Jarvela noticed the missing gene and went on the hunt to find out how mosquitos survive without it. She identified the first example of nature swapping out closely related genes, a phenomenon that poses caveats for studies using model organisms as proxies for other species. The research was published September 30, 2020, in Communications Biology. (2020-09-30)

How zika virus degrades essential protein for neurological development via autophagy
Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) shed new light on how Zika virus hijacks our own cellular machinery to break down an essential protein for neurological development, getting it to ''eat itself''. By triggering this process known as autophagy, Zika virus is able to degrade an important protein, a process that may contribute to the development of neurological or brain deficiencies and congenital birth defects in the newborns of infected pregnant women. (2020-09-28)

New tool mimics human skin to allow detailed study of mosquito biting
Scientists have developed a tool for studying the biting behaviour of common pathogen-carrying mosquitoes, according to new research published this week in eLife. (2020-09-23)

Rising temperatures could shift US West Nile virus transmission
West Nile virus spreads most efficiently in the US at temperatures between 24-25 degrees Celsius (75.2-77 degrees Fahrenheit), a new study published today in eLife shows. (2020-09-15)

Human activities promote disease-spreading mosquitoes; more study needed for prevention
Disease-spreading mosquitoes may be more likely to occupy areas impacted by human activities like pesticide use and habitat destruction, than they are areas less disturbed by humans, a recent Oregon State University study found. (2020-09-14)

Engineering speciation events in insects may be used to control harmful pests
This research provides the foundations for scientists to be able to prevent genetically modified organisms from reproducing with wild organisms. Additionally, the research will allow scientists to develop new tools to control populations of disease carrying insects and invasive species in a highly targeted fashion. (2020-09-08)

Mosquito immune system mapped to help fight malaria
Scientists have created the first cell atlas of mosquito immune cells, to understand how mosquitoes fight malaria and other infections. Researchers from the Sanger Institute and collaborators discovered new types of mosquito immune cells, including a rare cell type that could be involved in limiting malaria infection. The findings offer opportunities for uncovering novel ways to prevent mosquitoes from spreading the malaria parasite to humans and break the chain of malaria transmission. (2020-08-27)

Researchers show potential for subseasonal forecasts to predict dengue outbreaks
A new study demonstrates for the first time that subseasonal rainfall and temperature forecasts can be used to predict outbreaks of dengue fever by estimating mosquito abundance. (2020-08-25)

Warming climate may trigger more West Nile outbreaks in Southern California
A new study of captured mosquitoes in Los Angeles finds that West Nile infection is strongly associated with average temperature, and that temperatures above 73 degrees Fahrenheit are highly favorable for West Nile transmission. As climate change brings hotter weather to the region, it is likely that cooler, coastal neighborhoods will be pushed into the 'favorable' zone, accelerating transmission of the virus. (2020-08-05)

Researchers uncovered the Zika virus mutation responsible for quick spread, birth defects
A multidisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a Zika virus mutation that may be responsible for the explosive viral transmission in 2015/2016 and for the cause of microcephaly (babies with small heads) born to infected pregnant women. The study is currently available in Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences. (2020-08-03)

The mystery of the less deadly mosquito nets
Research published in Nature Communications shows that insecticide-treated mosquito nets, the mainstay in the global battle against malaria, are not providing the protection they once did - and scientists say that's a cause for serious concern in tropical and subtropical countries around the globe. (2020-07-28)

Study reveals how different mosquitoes respond to light and ti
In a new study, researchers found that night- versus day-biting species of mosquitoes are behaviorally attracted and repelled by different colors of light at different times of day. Mosquitoes are among major disease vectors impacting humans and animals around the world and the findings have important implications for using light to control them. (2020-07-27)

How mosquitoes got their taste for human blood and what it means for the future
To predict and help control the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses, it's important to know where and why certain mosquitoes got their taste for biting humans in the first place. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on July 23 have identified two major factors: a dry climate and city life. Based on these findings, they predict that increased urbanization in the coming decades will mean even more human-biting mosquitoes in the future. (2020-07-23)

Where are arctic mosquitoes most abundant in Greenland and why?
Bzz! It's mosquito season in Greenland. June and July is when Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) are in peak abundance, buzzing about the tundra. While Arctic mosquitoes serve as an important food source to other animals, they are notorious for their role as pests to humans and wildlife. Yet, these mosquitoes spend most of their lives in an aquatic environment in shallow, tundra ponds. A Dartmouth study finds that Arctic mosquito populations appear to be driven by food quality rather than predator density. (2020-07-23)

K-State study first to show SARS-CoV-2 is not transmitted by mosquitoes
A new study by Kansas State University researchers is the first to confirm that SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, cannot be transmitted to people by mosquitoes. (2020-07-17)

Gut bacteria protect against mosquito-borne viral illness
A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that mice infected with Chikungunya virus get less sick and are less likely to transmit the virus to mosquitoes if they have healthy gut microbiomes. (2020-07-14)

Converting female mosquitoes to non-biting males with implications for mosquito control
''Nix has great potential for developing mosquito control strategies to reduce vector populations through female-to-male sex conversion, or to aid in the Sterile Insect Technique, which requires releasing only nonbiting males,'' said James Biedler, a research scientist in the Tu lab. (2020-07-14)

Malaria's secret to surviving in the blood uncovered
New research from the Francis Crick Institute has found how the malaria parasite protects itself from toxic compounds in red blood cells. (2020-06-30)

Parents twice as likely to be concerned about ticks than of mosquitoes
When it comes to bug bites, parents are twice as likely to be concerned about ticks as they are about mosquitoes transmitting disease, a new national poll finds. (2020-06-15)

An ISGlobal team achieves massive sexual conversion of the malaria parasite in a dish
The technique will facilitate the design of new tools to block disease transmission. (2020-06-10)

Stanford-led study suggests a new approach to reducing spread of mosquito-borne diseases
Stanford researchers working in rural Kenya have identified the most productive breeding habitats for mosquitoes that spread a range of untreatable viruses. Their findings point to more effective health interventions that focus on the purpose of water-holding containers. (2020-06-08)

Volcanic glass spray shows promise in controlling mosquitoes
An indoor residual spray made by combining a type of volcanic glass with water showed effective control of mosquitoes that carry malaria, according to a new study. The findings could be useful in reducing disease-carrying mosquito populations - and the risk of malaria - in Africa. (2020-06-05)

Asian tiger mosquito gains ground in Illinois
Researchers report that the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has become more abundant across Illinois in the past three decades. Its spread is problematic, as the mosquito can transmit diseases -- like chikungunya or dengue fever -- to humans. (2020-06-04)

Malaria vaccines based on engineered parasites show safety, signs of efficacy
Two vaccines for malaria based on genetically engineered malaria parasites have been found to be safe in humans and show preliminary signs of protection, according to a pair of new phase 1/2a clinical trials. (2020-05-20)

First clinical trial with genetically modified malaria vaccine completed
In an innovative study, Radboudumc and LUMC jointly tested a candidate vaccine based on a genetically weakened malaria parasite. The results of this clinical trial, published in Science Translational Medicine, show that the vaccine is safe and elicits a defense response against a malaria infection. (2020-05-20)

Lidar technology demonstrates how light levels determine mosquito 'rush hour'
The first study to remotely track wild mosquito populations using laser radar (lidar) technology found that mosquitoes in a southeastern Tanzanian village are most active during morning and evening 'rush hour' periods, suggesting these may be the most effective times to target the insects with sprays designed to prevent the spread of malaria. (2020-05-13)

Malaria mosquitoes eliminated in lab by creating all-male populations
A modification that creates more male offspring was able to eliminate populations of malaria mosquitoes in lab experiments. (2020-05-12)

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