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Current Moths News and Events, Moths News Articles.
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Peculiar behavior of the beetle Toramus larvae
When studying the larval morphology of Toramini (Coleoptera: Erotylidae) we found that larvae of the genus Toramus attach their exuviae to their distal abdomen, with each exuvia from the preceding instar attached to the next to form a vertical pile. (2020-05-21)
How some insects manage to halt their own growth in harsh conditions
Most insects alter their own development or physiology to overcome adverse conditions, such as harsh winters. (2020-05-19)
Lidar technology demonstrates how light levels determine mosquito 'rush hour'
The first study to remotely track wild mosquito populations using laser radar (lidar) technology found that mosquitoes in a southeastern Tanzanian village are most active during morning and evening 'rush hour' periods, suggesting these may be the most effective times to target the insects with sprays designed to prevent the spread of malaria. (2020-05-13)
Lyin' eyes: Butterfly, moth eyespots may look the same, but likely evolved separately
The iconic eyespots that some moths and butterflies use to ward off predators likely evolved in distinct ways, providing insights into how these insects became so diverse. (2020-05-06)
New species of moths discovered in the Alps named after three famous alpinists
During a genetic project of the Tyrolean State Museums in Innsbruck, Austrian entomologist and head of the Natural Science Collections Peter Huemer used an integrative research approach to study four long-known, yet controversial European moths. (2020-04-27)
Why do men -- and other male animals -- tend to die younger? It's all in the Y chromosome
Males of most animal species die earlier than females because their smaller Y chromosome is unable to protect an unhealthy X chromosome, research suggests. (2020-03-03)
Deaf moths evolved noise-cancelling scales to evade prey
Some species of deaf moths can absorb as much as 85 per cent of the incoming sound energy from predatory bats -- who use echolocation to detect them. (2020-02-25)
Enigmatic small primate finally caught on film in Taita, Kenya
The Taita mountain dwarf galago was first reported in 2002 but no more signs of it were found for almost 20 years. (2020-02-17)
Climate warming disrupts tree seed production
Research involving the University of Liverpool has revealed the effect of climate warming on the complex interactions between tree masting and the insects that eat their seeds. (2020-02-12)
Orb-weaver spiders' yellow and black pattern helps them lure prey
Being inconspicuous might seem the best strategy for spiders to catch potential prey in their webs, but many orb-web spiders, which hunt in this way, are brightly coloured. (2020-02-11)
First release of genetically engineered moth could herald new era of crop protection
For decades, the agriculture industry has been trying to find biological and environmentally friendly ways to manage the diamondback moth, which is widely resistant to insecticides. (2020-01-29)
Moths' flight data helps drones navigate complex environments
The flight navigation strategy of moths can be used to develop programs that help drones to navigate unfamiliar environments, report Ioannis Paschalidis at Boston University, Thomas Daniel at University of Washington, and colleagues, in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology. (2020-01-09)
Moths and perhaps other animals rely on precise timing of neural spikes
By capturing and analyzing nearly all of the brain signals sent to the wing muscles of hawk moths (Manduca sexta), researchers have shown that precise timing within rapid sequences of neural signal spikes is essential to controlling the flight muscles necessary for the moths to eat. (2019-12-17)
Lazy moths taste disgusting
Researchers have noticed that some moths are nonchalant when attacked by predatory bats. (2019-12-16)
Research explores how grape pests sniff out berries
A new study, published Nov. 21 in the Journal of Chemical Ecology, investigates how these pests find their target amid a sea of other plants in the landscape. (2019-12-10)
Four ways to curb light pollution, save bugs
Artificial light at night negatively impacts thousands of species: beetles, moths, wasps and other insects that have evolved to use light levels as cues for courtship, foraging and navigation. (2019-11-18)
Scientists identify British butterflies most threatened by climate change
Many British butterflies and moths have been responding to warmer temperatures by emerging earlier in the year and for the first time scientists have identified why this is creating winners and losers among species. (2019-10-24)
Industrial melanism linked to same gene in 3 moth species
The rise of dark forms of many species of moth in heavily polluted areas of 19th and 20th century Britain, known as industrial melanism, was a highly visible response to environmental change. (2019-10-17)
When laying their eggs, tobacco hawkmoths avoid plants that smell of caterpillar feces
Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology demonstrated that not only plant odors determine the best oviposition site for egglaying hawkmoths, but also the frass of other larvae. (2019-10-08)
Bats use private and social information as they hunt
As some of the most savvy and sophisticated predators out there, bats eavesdrop on their prey and even on other bats to collect a wide variety of information as they hunt. (2019-09-24)
Paleontologists discovered diversity of insect pollinators in 99-million-year-old amber
A team of paleontologists from the Borissiak Paleontological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences (Moscow) discovered four new species of extinct insects with sucking mouthparts in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. (2019-08-28)
Two new species of parasitic wasps described from an altitude of over 3,400 m in Tibet
Specimens kept in the collection of the Institute of Beneficial Insects at the Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University (China) revealed the existence of two previously unknown species of endoparasitic wasps. (2019-07-03)
The chemical language of plants depends on context
Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, studied the ecological function of linalool in Nicotiana attenuata tobacco plants. (2019-07-01)
God doesn't play dice -- does cancer?
Colorado study suggests that changes to the tissue ecosystem and not necessarily mutations allows growth of cancer. (2019-06-20)
New to science New Zealand moths link mythological deities to James Cameron's films
In an unexpected discovery, two species of macro-moths were described as new species endemic to the South Island, New Zealand. (2019-06-11)
Four new species of plume moths discovered in Bahamas
Deborah Matthews hunts for plume moths in darkness, waiting for the halo of her headlamp to catch a brief flicker. (2019-06-07)
Russian scientists make discovery that can help remove gypsy moths from forests
The caterpillars of Lymantria dispar or Gypsy Moth are voracious eaters capable of defoliating entire forests. (2019-05-20)
Finnish researchers discover a new moth family
Two moth species new to science belonging to a previously unknown genus and family have been found in Kazakhstan, constituting an exceptional discovery. (2019-05-09)
An important function of non-nucleated sperm
Some animals form characteristic infertile spermatozoa called parasperm, which differ in size and shape compared to fertile sperm produced by single males. (2019-04-29)
Could climate change cause infertility?
A number of plant and animal species could find it increasingly difficult to reproduce if climate change worsens and global temperatures become more extreme -- a stark warning highlighted by new scientific research. (2019-04-15)
DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors
Researchers have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. (2019-02-08)
Deaf moth evolves sound-production as a warning to outwit its predator
A genus of deaf moth has evolved to develop an extraordinary sound-producing structure in its wings to evade its primary predator the bat. (2019-02-05)
Ecological benefits of part-night lighting revealed
Study shows there is no difference in pollination success between part-night lighting and full darkness, highlighting the ecological benefit of switching off our street lights even for short periods in the night. (2019-01-20)
Big genome found in tiny forest defoliator
Drs. Don Gammon and Nick Grishin of UT Southwestern have sequenced the genomes of the European gypsy moth and its even more destructive cousin, the Asian gypsy moth. (2019-01-14)
Antennal sensors allow hawkmoths to make quick moves
All insects use vision to control their position in the air when they fly, but they also integrate information from other senses. (2018-12-20)
Birds can mistake some caterpillars for snakes; can robots help? 
Researchers witnessed a hummingbird defending its nest from what it interpreted to be a snake, but was actually a caterpillar of the moth Oxytenis modestia. The encounter is described in a new paper published in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecology.  (2018-12-17)
New butterfly named for pioneering 17th-century entomologist Maria Sibylla Merian
More than two centuries before initiatives to increase the number of women in STEM fields, Maria Sibylla Merian was a professional artist and naturalist whose close observations and illustrations were the first to accurately portray the metamorphosis of butterflies and moths and emphasize the intimate relationship between insects and their host plants. (2018-12-05)
Austrian-Danish research team discover as many as 22 new moth species from across Europe
Following a long-year study of the family of twirler moths, scientists from the Tyrolean State Museum, Austria and the Zoological Museum of the University of Copenhagen have discovered a startling total of 44 new species, including as many as 22 species inhabiting various regions throughout Europe. (2018-11-29)
Moths and magnets could save lives
Rice University bioengineers have combined a virus that infects moths with magnetic nanoparticles to create a potential new therapy for inherited genetic diseases like muscular dystrophy, sickle cell, cystic fibrosis, spinal muscular atrophy and some forms of cancer. (2018-11-13)
Resonant mechanism discovery could inspire ultra-thin acoustic absorbers
New research led by academics at the University of Bristol has discovered that the scales on moth wings vibrate and can absorb the sound frequencies used by bats for echolocation (biological sonar). (2018-11-12)
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