Current Motivation News and Events

Current Motivation News and Events, Motivation News Articles.
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Chronic alcohol use reshapes the brain's immune landscape, driving anxiety and addiction
Deep within the brain, a small almond-shaped region called the amygdala plays a vital role in how we exhibit emotion, behavior and motivation; it's also strongly implicated in alcohol abuse. Now, for the first time, a Scripps Research team has identified important changes to anti-inflammatory mechanisms and cellular activity in the amygdala that drive alcohol addiction. (2020-11-16)

Animal groups consider multiple factors before fighting
Groups of animals consider multiple factors before deciding whether to fight rivals, researchers say. (2020-11-10)

Weight loss shouldn't be the goal of PE
For adults, the goal of exercise is often to shed some pounds, but new research from the University of Georgia suggests the objective should be different for kids. (2020-11-10)

Green prescriptions could undermine the benefits of spending time in nature
Spending time in nature is believed to benefit people's mental health. However, new research suggests that giving people with existing mental health conditions formal 'green prescriptions', may undermine some of the benefits (2020-11-06)

Conflicts in kindergarten can reduce children's interest in reading and math
Teacher-perceived conflict predicts lower interest and pre-academic skills in math and literacy among kindergarteners, a new study from Finland shows. (2020-11-05)

Study helps explain why motivation to learn declines with age
MIT neuroscientists have identified a brain circuit critical for learning to make decisions that require evaluating the cost or reward of an action. They showed this circuit is negatively affected by aging and in Huntington's disease. (2020-10-28)

Divide and conquer: a new formula to minimize 'mathemaphobia'
Maths - it's the subject some kids love to hate, yet despite its lack of popularity, mathematics is critical for a STEM-capable workforce and vital for Australia's current and future productivity. New research finds that boosting student confidence in maths, is pivotal to greater engagement with the subject. (2020-10-26)

IU study examines effects of low-level lead exposure and alcohol consumption
A new IU study examining effects of low-level developmental lead exposure in mice could explain why some people dependent on alcohol return to using. (2020-10-13)

Caring for others is a key driver in getting people to use chatbots for mental health
A study assessed what would motivate people to use chatbots for mental health services in the wake of a mass shooting. The researchers found that users' desire to help others with mental health problems was a more powerful driver than seeking help for their own problems. (2020-10-05)

Young physicist 'squares the numbers' on time travel
Paradox-free time travel is theoretically possible, according to the mathematical modelling of a prodigious University of Queensland undergraduate student. (2020-09-23)

Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known ''happy hormones'', and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with. (2020-09-22)

Reward and punishment take similar paths in the mouse brain
One brain pathway, originating from the striosome, regulates the motivations that influence behavior. Previously, this part of the brain was thought to support reward-seeking and positive reinforcement for learning. The discovery that some neurons in this pathway contribute instead to negative-reinforcement learning reveals the striosome to be a complex motivation-processing hub. Motivation processing is impaired in people with certain mental illnesses. (2020-09-15)

Apps and social distancing: Why we accept corona rules - or not
Study in psychology explores which factors are related to our motivation to use corona apps and to perform social distancing. (2020-09-04)

Inequality of opportunity drags down everyone's motivation
Unequal compensation reduces people's motivation to work, even among those who stand to benefit from unfair advantages, finds a new UCL-led study published in PLOS One. (2020-09-04)

Researchers reversibly disable brain pathway in primates
For the first time ever, neurophysiologists of KU Leuven, Harvard and the University of Kyoto have succeeded in reversibly disabling a connection between two areas in the brains of primates while they were performing cognitive tasks, or while their entire brain activity was being monitored. The disconnection had a negative impact on the motivation of the animals, but not on their learning behaviour. The study, which was published in Neuron, may eventually lead to more targeted treatments for certain brain disorders. (2020-08-25)

Social connection boosts fitness app appeal
Apps alone don't motivate most people to exercise but interacting with an online exercise community as well provides the impetus for exercisers to do more - and enjoy what they are doing. (2020-08-17)

The (neuro)science of getting and staying motivated
Neuroscientists at EPFL and the University of Edinburgh have discovered that the degree of motivation and the stamina to keep it up depends on the ratio between the neurotransmitters glutamine and glutamate in the nucleus accumbens of the brain. (2020-08-12)

Academic achievement is influenced by how pupils 'do' gender at school
Pupils' achievements at school are often shaped by the way that they 'act out' specific gender roles, according to a new study which warns against over-generalising the gender gap in education. The study, by researchers at the University of Cambridge, suggests that young people's attainment is linked to their ideas about what it means to be male or female. Those who defy traditional gender stereotypes appear to do better in the classroom. (2020-07-30)

Quantifying creativity to expand it? Better art begins with better understanding
Do different painting materials affect the creation of children's paintings? How might we increase children's focus and motivation to learn, while also improving their creativity? Researchers focusing on these very questions at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) have recently published the results of a wide-spanning study involving more than 650 children, revealing insight into improving fine art education for children. (2020-06-22)

A fair reward ensures a good memory
By deciphering the neural dialogue between the brain's reward and memory networks, a new study demonstrates that the lasting positive effect of a reward on the ability of individuals to retain a variety of information. (2020-06-17)

A Neandertal from Chagyrskaya Cave
Until now, only the genomes of two Neandertals have been sequenced to high quality: one from Vindjia Cave in modern-day Croatia and one from Denisova Cave in Siberia's Altai Mountains. A research team led by Svante Pääbo from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has now sequenced the genome of a third Neandertal whose remains were found - 106 kilometres away from the latter site - in Chagyrskaya Cave. (2020-06-17)

AI management can benefit the growing online workforce
USC research shows that gig workers and others in the new crowdwork economy need more autonomy and clear purpose in online tasks to perform at a high level -- advantages that AI assistance offers. The findings are significant for an economy changed by coronavirus pandemic. (2020-05-26)

How exposure to negative feedback in influences goal-directed consumer behaviors
Threats to self-esteem and negative feedback are pervasive in today's society. Social media researchers, for example, have shown a link between frequent usage of social media websites and upward social comparison and negative affect. (2020-05-26)

Study: Women entrepreneurs are more motivated by social impact than money
A new study from researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Columbia sheds light on the attributes that drive different types of entrepreneurs. By examining how entrepreneurs responded to motivation-related messages that involve money and social impact, the researchers concluded that women and people in altruistic cultures are more motivated by messages of social impact than by those related to money while men and people in less altruistic cultures are more motivated by messages related to money. (2020-05-20)

Inspiring stories from women like themselves helped these moms improve their diet
When researchers asked prospective study participants who they would like to see in videos promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors, the answer was unequivocal: They wanted to see themselves -- that is, other mothers living in low-income households who were overweight or obese. The researchers obliged. And the intervention they designed produced the desired results when it came to improving participants' diet. (2020-05-20)

Just read my face, baby
Are you good at reading your partner's emotions? Your perceptiveness may very well strengthen your relationship. Yet when anger or contempt enter the fray, little is to be gained and the quality of your relationship tanks, researchers found. (2020-05-20)

The brain's facial recognition area doesn't differentiate outgroup members
A quirk in how the brain processes faces makes it harder to tell members of a racial outgroup apart, according to new research published in eNeuro. (2020-05-18)

Parents that know a child's preferences can assertively guide exercise
A parent who knows a child's preferences and participates in the activities can guide the child assertively without diminishing the child's enthusiasm for physical activity and exercise. (2020-05-15)

Are our brains hard-wired for longing?
A new brain imaging study of prairie voles -- which are among only about 5% of mammalian species besides humans who are monogamous -- found that when it comes to forming bonds, longing may be as important as being together. The study also sheds light on why it's so hard to social distance, and could lead to new therapies for conditions like autism and depression. (2020-05-11)

A talk with your GP may prevent cardiovascular disease
Having a general practitioner (GP) who is trained in motivational interviewing may reduce your risk of getting cardiovascular disease. But only if you do not already have diabetes or are at risk of developing it. This is shown by a new randomised study from Aarhus University. (2020-04-14)

How dopamine drives brain activity
Using a specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensor that can track dopamine levels, MIT neuroscientists have discovered how dopamine released deep within the brain influences distant brain regions. (2020-04-01)

Ritalin and similar medications cause brain to focus on benefits of work, not costs
New research from cognitive neuroscientists at Brown and Radboud universities has pinpointed how stimulants such as Ritalin and Adderall can change people's motivation to complete difficult tasks. (2020-03-19)

Not finding new goals post-retirement associated with greater cognitive decline
Certain middle-aged and older adults, especially women who tend to disengage from difficult tasks and goals after they retire, may be at greater risk of cognitive decline as they age, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-03-16)

Instagram makes it easier to exercise
People who followed researchers' motivational posts on Instagram got more enjoyment out of their training sessions. Just a couple of minutes over the course of four weeks was enough to make a difference. (2020-03-16)

Buffed-up avatars deter us from exercising hard
An award-winning paper from the University of Bath shows people perform better in VR exercise games when they compete against a realistic avatar of themselves. (2020-03-13)

How brain biology promotes starvation in patients with anorexia nervosa
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered differences in brain circuitry that contribute to starvation and weight loss in people with anorexia nervosa. (2020-03-12)

Sorry, Einstein: Hard workers may make better role models than geniuses
Role models are important for aspiring scientists, but new research suggests that scientists who are known for their hard work -- like Thomas Edison -- are more motivating than scientists who are viewed as naturally brilliant, like Albert Einstein. (2020-03-11)

Rats avoid to hurt other rats
In a new paper published in the leading scientific journal Current Biology, a team of neuroscientists of the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience shows that male and female rats show harm aversion. This phenomenon depends on the same brain region associated with empathy in humans. This indicates that harm aversion is deeply engrained in our biology, and paves the way to future work on how to increase harm aversion in psychiatric diseases. (2020-03-05)

Men can smell when a woman is sexually aroused
University of Kent research suggests that men can distinguish between the scents of sexually aroused and non-aroused women. The detection of sexual arousal through smell may function as an additional channel in the communication of sexual interest and provide further verification of human sexual interest. (2020-03-03)

High sugar diet may impair metabolic health & maternal care after pregnancy
Rats on a high sugar diet during pregnancy have altered levels of sex steroid hormones and dopamine in their brains, which may lead to behavioural changes that can affect care of offspring and motivation, as well as increasing the risk of diabetes and liver disease, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology. (2020-02-28)

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