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Becoming a nerve cell: Timing is of the essence
A Belgian team of researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen (VIB-KU Leuven) finds that mitochondria regulate a key event during brain development: how neural stem cells become nerve cells. (2020-08-13)
KIST finds a strong correlation between ultrasonic stroke rehabilitation treatment and brain waves
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team led, by Dr. (2020-08-12)
Adaptation in single neurons provides memory for language processing
To understand language, we have to remember the words that were uttered and combine them into an interpretation. (2020-08-12)
Math shows how brain stays stable amid internal noise and a widely varying world
A new theoretical framework shows that many properties of neural connections help biological circuits produce consistent computations. (2020-08-10)
Success in promoting plant growth for biodiesel
Scientists of Waseda University in Japan succeeded in promoting plant growth and increasing seed yield by heterologous expression of protein from Arabidopsis (artificially modified high-speed motor protein) in Camelina sativa, which is expected as a useful plant for biodiesel. (2020-08-07)
Pinpointing the cells that keep the body's master circadian clock ticking
UT Southwestern scientists have developed a genetically engineered mouse and imaging system that lets them visualize fluctuations in the circadian clocks of cell types in mice. (2020-08-07)
REM sleep tunes eating behavior
REM sleep tunes eating behavior. (2020-08-06)
The bouncer in the brain
How do you keep orientation in a complex environment, like the city of Vienna? (2020-08-06)
Research suggests viability of brain computer to improve function in paralyzed patient
Researchers demonstrated the success of a fully implantable wireless medical device called a stentrode brain-computer interface designed to improve functional independence in patients with severe paralysis. (2020-08-06)
Training neural circuits early in development improves response, study finds
When it comes to training neural circuits for tissue engineering or biomedical applications, a new study suggests a key parameter: Train them young. (2020-08-06)
Autism: How a gene alteration modifies social behavior
A team of researchers at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has discovered a new connection between a genetic alteration and social difficulties related to autism: A mutation in the neuroligin-3 gene reduces the effect of the hormone oxytocin. (2020-08-05)
Implanted neural stem cell grafts show functionality in spinal cord injuries
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report successfully implanting specialized grafts of neural stem cells directly into spinal cord injuries in mice, then documenting how the grafts grew and filled the injury sites, mimicking the animals' existing neuronal network. (2020-08-05)
Break it down: A new way to address common computing problem
A new algorithm developed in the lab of Jr-Shin Li at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. (2020-08-04)
New study on development of Parkinson's disease is 'on the nose'
Scientists suggest that the initial impact of environmental toxins inhaled through the nose may induce inflammation in the brain, triggering the production of Lewy bodies that can then be spread to other brain regions. (2020-08-03)
Mathematical modeling revealed how chitinase, a molecular monorail, obeys a one-way sign
A novel mathematical modeling method has been developed to estimate operation models of biomolecular motors from single-molecule imaging data of motion with the Bayesian inference framework. (2020-08-03)
Autism spectrum disorder can be predicted from health checkups at 18 months
An early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, a type of developmental disorder was found to be effective from routine health checkups of infants at 18 months of age. (2020-08-03)
Energy demands limit our brains' information processing capacity
Our brains have an upper limit on how much they can process at once due to a constant but limited energy supply, according to a new UCL study using a brain imaging method that measures cellular metabolism. (2020-08-03)
Study reveals less connectivity between hey brain regions in people with FXTAS premutation
Investigators from the University of Kansas were able to identify brain processes specifically linked to sensorimotor issues in aging people with the FMR1 premutation. (2020-08-03)
Brain cell types identified that may push males to fight and have sex
Two groups of nerve cells may serve as ''on-off switches'' for male mating and aggression, suggests a new study in rodents. (2020-07-27)
Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-07-27)
Neurons are genetically programmed to have long lives
Most neurons are created during embryonic development and have no ''backup'' after birth. (2020-07-24)
Big brains and dexterous hands
Primates with large brains can master more complex hand movements than those with smaller brains. (2020-07-24)
How COVID-19 causes smell loss
Loss of smell, or anosmia, is one of the earliest and most commonly reported symptoms of COVID-19. (2020-07-24)
SARS-CoV-2 infection of non-neuronal cells, not neurons, may drive loss of smell in patients with COVID-19
A new study of human olfactory cells has revealed that viral invasion of supportive cells in the nasal cavity might be driving the loss of smell seen in some patients with COVID-19. (2020-07-24)
Cells react differently to genomic imprinting
We inherit half of our genes from each parent. For their function of most genes, it doesn't matter which parent a gene comes from. (2020-07-23)
Developing neural circuits linked to hunting behavior
Researchers demonstrated the relationship between improvements in zebrafish's hunting skills and the development of sensory coding in a part of the brain which responds to visual stimuli. (2020-07-23)
Remember the first time you...? Mysterious brain structure sheds light on addiction
Do you remember where you were when you first heard that two planes had crashed into New York's Twin Towers? (2020-07-23)
Two distinct circuits drive inhibition in the sensory thalamus of the brain
The thalamus is a 'Grand Central Station' for sensory information coming to our brains. (2020-07-23)
New approach simultaneously measures EEG and fMRI connectomes
Researchers have developed a new approach to compare changes in neural communication using electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging simultaneously. (2020-07-23)
Rely on gut feeling? New research identifies how second brain in gut communicates
You're faced with a big decision so your second brain provides what's normally referred to as 'gut instinct', but how did this sensation reach you before it was too late? (2020-07-23)
Putting the spring-cam back into stroke patients steps
A research group has developed a new, lightweight and motor-less device that can be easily attached to an ankle support device - otherwise known as an ankle foot orthosis (AFO). (2020-07-22)
Mapping the brain's sensory gatekeeper
Researchers from MIT and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have mapped the thalamic reticular nucleus in unprecedented detail, revealing that the region contains two distinct subnetworks of neurons with different functions. (2020-07-22)
How neurons reshape inside body fat to boost its calorie-burning capacity
Scientists have found that a hormone tells the brain to dramatically restructure neurons embedded in fat tissue. (2020-07-22)
Calcium channel subunits play a major role in autistic disorders
Neurobiologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have found new evidence that specific calcium channel subunits play a crucial role in the development of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. (2020-07-22)
Wireless, optical cochlear implant uses LED lights to restore hearing in rodents
Scientists have created an optical cochlear implant based on LED lights that can safely and partially restore the sensation of hearing in deaf rats and gerbils. (2020-07-22)
Study points to potential new approach to treating glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have shown for the first time that when one optic nerve in the eye is damaged, as in glaucoma, the opposite optic nerve comes to the rescue by sharing its metabolic energy. (2020-07-21)
"Love hormone" oxytocin could be used to treat cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's
Alzheimer's disease progressively degrades a person's memory and cognitive abilities, often resulting in dementia. (2020-07-20)
Restoring mobility by identifying the neurons that make it possible
Partial mobility can be restored in rodents with impaired spinal cords. (2020-07-20)
Study helps to settle debate on roles of REM and non-REM sleep in visual learning
A study by a team of Brown University researchers sheds new light on the complementary roles of REM and non-REM sleep in visual perceptual learning. (2020-07-20)
A mechanical way to stimulate neurons
Magnetic nanodiscs can be activated by an external magnetic field, providing a research tool for studying neural responses. (2020-07-20)
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