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Current Movement News and Events

Current Movement News and Events, Movement News Articles.
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New imaging technique reveals 'burst' of activity before cell death
Using a novel optical imaging technique, Northwestern University's Vadim Backman and researchers discovered connections between the macromolecular structure and dynamic movement of chromatin within eukaryotic cells. (2019-04-11)
Conservationists clash over ways forward despite sharing 'core aims', study finds
Latest research reveals rifts within global conservation movement while confirming support for aims underpinning it. (2019-04-09)
How understanding animal behavior can support wildlife conservation
Researchers from EPFL and the University of Zurich have developed a model that uses data from sensors worn by meerkats to gain a more detailed picture of how animals behave in the wild. (2019-04-03)
Artificial intelligence enables recognizing and assessing a violinist's bow movements
In playing music, gestures are extremely important, in part because they are directly related to the sound and the expressiveness of the musicians. (2019-04-02)
Running upright: The minuscule movements that keep us from falling
Maybe running comes easy, each stride pleasant and light. Maybe it comes hard, each step a slog to the finish. (2019-03-28)
Artificial intelligence identifies key patterns from video footage of infant movements
A simple video recording of an infant lying in bed can be analyzed with artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to extract quantitative information useful for assessing the child's development as well as the efficacy of ongoing therapy. (2019-03-26)
Climate change affecting fish in Ontario lakes, University of Guelph study reveals
Researchers have found warmer average water temperatures in Ontario lakes over the past decade have forced fish to forage in deeper water. (2019-03-22)
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Trevor move into Gulf of Carpentaria
Tropical Cyclone Trevor has crossed Queensland, Australia's Cape York Peninsula and re-emerged into the Gulf of Carpentaria. (2019-03-21)
Underwater surveys in Emerald Bay reveal the nature and activity of Lake Tahoe faults
Emerald Bay, California, a beautiful location on the southwestern shore of Lake Tahoe, is surrounded by rugged landscape, including rocky cliffs and remnants of mountain glaciers. (2019-03-19)
Machine learning tracks moving cells
Scientists can now study the migration of label-free cells at unprecedented resolution, a feat with applications across biology, disease research, and drug development. (2019-03-13)
Thanks to pig remains, scientists uncover extensive human mobility to sites near Stonehenge
A mutli-isotope analysis of pigs remains found around henge complexes near Stonehenge has revealed the large extent and scale of movements of human communities in Britain during the Late Neolithic. (2019-03-13)
One among many
Anyone moving in a large crowd, absorbed in their phone and yet avoiding collisions, follows certain laws that they themselves create. (2019-03-12)
Speedy 'slingshot' cell movement observed for the first time
By slingshotting themselves forward, human cells can travel more than five times faster than previously documented. (2019-03-12)
Parkinson's treatment delivers a power-up to brain cell 'batteries'
Scientists have gained clues into how a Parkinson's disease treatment, called deep brain stimulation, helps tackle symptoms. (2019-03-12)
NYU Abu Dhabi study finds grasping motions lead by visuo-haptic signals are most effective
NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have found that the availability of both visual and haptic information for a target object significantly improves reach-to-grasp actions, demonstrating that the nervous system utilizes both types of information to optimize movement execution. (2019-03-06)
Tracking firefighters in burning buildings
McMaster researchers, working with partners at other universities, have created a motion-powered, fireproof sensor that can track the movements of firefighters, steelworkers, miners and others who work in high-risk environments where they cannot always be seen. (2019-03-01)
Understanding high efficiency of deep ultraviolet LEDs
Deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (DUV-LEDs) made from aluminium gallium nitride (AlGaN) efficiently transfer electrical energy to optical energy due to the growth of one of its bottom layers in a step-like fashion. (2019-02-22)
Altered brain activity patterns of parkinson's captured in mice
Researchers pinpoint how brain activity changes in mouse models of Parkinson's disease, hinting at what may drive symptoms in humans. (2019-02-19)
Let's dance!
Research shows that dance supports wellbeing, improves group spirit, and boosts learning. (2019-02-19)
Movement impairments in autism could be reversible
Researchers from Cardiff University have established a link between a genetic mutation and developmental movement impairments in autism. (2019-02-13)
Questions in quantum computing: How to move electrons with light
To design future quantum technologies, scientists pinpoint how microwaves interact with matter. (2019-02-11)
Examining Nazi obsession with movement further reveals how they manufactured the idea of race
In a recent article in the journal American Historical Review, Denning argues that by paying attention to the Nazis' obsession with mobility, we can deepen our understanding of how they manufactured and exploited the idea of race. (2019-02-04)
Adaptive models capture complexity of the brain and behavior
Scientists reveal rich details of dynamical systems by breaking them down into simpler components which change over time. (2019-01-31)
Putting that free energy around you to good use with minuscule energy harvesters
Scientists at Tokyo Tech developed a micro-electromechanical energy harvester that allows for more flexibility in design, which is crucial for future IoT applications. (2019-01-27)
The first tendril-like soft robot able to climb
Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia obtained the first soft robot mimicking plant tendrils: it is able to curl and climb, using the same physical principles determining water transport in plants. (2019-01-24)
How our cellular antennas are formed
Most of our cells contain an immobile primary cilium. The 'skeleton' of the cilium consists of microtubule doublets, which are 'pairs' of proteins essential for their formation and function. (2019-01-17)
Wearable sensor can detect hidden anxiety, depression in young children
Anxiety and depression in young children are hard to detect and often go untreated, potentially leading to anxiety disorders and increased risk of suicide and drug abuse later. (2019-01-16)
Moving more in old age may protect brain from dementia
lder adults who move more than average, either in the form of daily exercise or just routine physical activity such as housework, may maintain more of their memory and thinking skills than people who are less active than average, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study by Rush University Medical Center published in the January 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-01-16)
RUDN pedologists found out a correct combination of nitrogen fertilizers and plastic mulch
RUDN pedologists studied the combined effect of nitrogen-containing fertilizers and plastic mulching. (2019-01-15)
Discovery casts doubt on cell surface organization models L
Like planets, the body's cell surfaces look smooth from a distance but hilly closer up. (2019-01-14)
Stick insect study shows the significance of passive muscle force for fast movements
Zoologists from the University of Cologne gain new insights into the motor function of limbs of different sizes. (2019-01-09)
Do large human crowds exhibit a collective behavior?
By observing the collective movement of thousands of Chicago Marathon runners queueing up to the starting line, researchers find that the motion of large crowds is fluid-like and mathematically predictable. (2019-01-03)
A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds
By studying the movement of runners at the start of marathons, researchers from a laboratory* affiliated with the CNRS, l'ENS de Lyon, and l'Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 have just shown that the collective movements of these crowds can be described as liquid flows. (2019-01-03)
Electric fish in augmented reality reveal how animals 'actively sense' world around them
In a new study, NJIT and Johns Hopkins researchers have used augmented reality technology to unravel the mysterious dynamic between active sensing movement and sensory feedback. (2018-12-21)
Mind-body exercises may improve cognitive function as adults age
Mind-body exercises -- especially tai chi and dance mind-body exercise -- are beneficial for improving global cognition, cognitive flexibility, working memory, verbal fluency, and learning in older adults. (2018-12-19)
New insights on animal movement in fire-prone landscapes
A new Biological Reviews article considers how fire histories affect animals' movement and shape the distribution of species. (2018-12-19)
Snowed in: Wolves stay put when it's snowing, study shows
Wolves travel shorter distances and move slower during snowfall events, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2018-12-19)
Resting easy: Oxygen promotes deep, restorative sleep, study shows
Exposure to high levels of oxygen encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep, according to a new study by University of Alberta neuroscientists. (2018-12-12)
Future doctors learn how to prescribe physical activity for their patients
An initiative adopted by Lancaster University to embed physical activity into the training for medical students has been showcased at a national and international level. (2018-12-11)
Using drones to simplify film animation
Producing realistic animated film figures is a highly complex technical endeavour. (2018-12-05)
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