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Current Movement News and Events, Movement News Articles.
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'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement
A computer model shows that a starfish-like animal can coordinate rhythmic motion based on body structure without the brain telling them to do so. (2019-07-12)
New gene linked to healthy ageing in worms
Damage to gene causes impaired movement in adult worms. (2019-07-12)
Study explores how social movements can use virtual worlds
Online virtual worlds can help social movements raise awareness and create safe spaces for their members, according to a new study by an academic at the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2019-07-10)
Researchers identify maximum weight children should carry in school backpacks
Scientists from the University of Granada and Liverpool John Moores University (UK) have established that school children who use backpacks should avoid loads of more than 10% of their body weight -- and those who use trolleys, 20% of their body weight. (2019-07-02)
DGIST Discovers control of cell signaling using a cobalt (iii)-nitrosyl complex
Joint research team of Professors Jaeheung Cho and Daeha Seo in the Department of Emerging Materials Science developed a technology to control the generation of nitric oxide in cells. (2019-07-02)
Researchers study healthy ALS neurons as way to understand resistance to the disease
Scientists have developed a stem-cell-based modeling system that identifies how some neurons are resistant to ALS -- a breakthrough that offers potential for battling neurodegeneration. (2019-06-25)
Slime travelers
New UC Riverside-led research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. (2019-06-20)
The evolution of puppy dog eyes
Dogs have evolved new muscles around the eyes to better communicate with humans. (2019-06-17)
Reaching and grasping -- Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain
When we train the reaching for and grasping of objects, we also train our brain. (2019-06-12)
A microscopic topographic map of cellular function
The flow of traffic through our nation's highways and byways is meticulously mapped and studied, but less is known about how materials in cells travel. (2019-06-12)
Research moves closer to brain-machine interface autonomy
A University of Houston biomedical engineer reports in eNeuro that a brain-computer interface, a form of artificial intelligence, can sense when its user is expecting a reward by examining the interactions between single-neuron activities and the information flowing to these neurons. (2019-06-11)
Scholars investigate how mirror activity works
A team of researchers from Germany and Russia, including Vadim Nikulin from the Higher School of Economics, have demonstrated that long contraction of muscles in one hand increases involuntary reaction of the other one. (2019-06-07)
The Earth's rotation moves water in Lake Garda
Lake Garda has not yet revealed all of its secrets. (2019-06-05)
US abortion politics: How did we get here and where are we headed?
After Roe v. Wade, the pro-life movement accelerated rapidly, describes Munson in a new paper, 'Protest and Religion: The US Pro-Life Movement,' published last week in the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. (2019-06-03)
Humans used northern migration routes to reach eastern Asia
Northern and Central Asia have been neglected in studies of early human migration, with deserts and mountains being considered uncompromising barriers. (2019-05-29)
On Mars, sands shift to a different drum
In the most detailed analysis of how sands move around on Mars, a team of planetary scientists led by the UA found that processes not involved in controlling sand movement on Earth play major roles on Mars. (2019-05-23)
Subtropical Storm Andrea gone girl
Subtropical Storm Andrea was gone before the storm could even reach Tropical Storm status. (2019-05-22)
Progress to restore movement in people with neuromotor disabilities
A study published in the advanced edition of April 12, 2019 in the journal Neural Computation shows that approaches based on Long Short-Term Memory decoders could provide better algorithms for neuroprostheses that employ Brain-Machine Interfaces to restore movement in patients with severe neuromotor disabilities. (2019-05-20)
Embryogenesis reveals the role of the 'second brain' in digestion
Two muscles in the gut move along and mix together ingested food, and in between them is an autonomous network of neurons. (2019-05-15)
Relay station in the brain controls our movements
The relay station of the brain, the substantia nigra consists of different types of nerve cells and is responsible for controlling the execution of diverse movements. (2019-05-14)
Species facing climate change could find help in odd place: Urban environments
Research shows that animals move faster through 'low quality' habitats (fulfilling a minimum of resources for survival) -- evidence that could change the way conservationists think about managing urban landscapes to help species move in response to climate change. (2019-05-14)
Mystery of texture of Guinness beer: inclination angle of a pint glass is key to solution
A team of researchers from Osaka University and Kirin Holdings Company, Limited demonstrated that the texture-formation in a pint glass of Guinness beer is induced by flow of a bubble-free fluid film flowing down along the wall of the glass, a world first. (2019-05-07)
Missing molecule hobbles cell movement
Cells are the body's workers, and they often need to move around to do their jobs. (2019-05-03)
It's hard to be a nomad in Mongolia
Scientists tracked 22 Mongolian gazelles (Procapra gutturosa) over the vast grasslands of Mongolia for a 1-3 year period using GPS. (2019-05-02)
Reggaeton can also contribute to feminist claims
A study led by Mònica Figueras, a researcher with the Department of Communication at UPF, together with Núria Araüna and Iolanda Tortajada, researchers from the Department of Communication at Rovira i Virgili University, published on March 25 in the journal Young. (2019-04-24)
New imaging technique reveals 'burst' of activity before cell death
Using a novel optical imaging technique, Northwestern University's Vadim Backman and researchers discovered connections between the macromolecular structure and dynamic movement of chromatin within eukaryotic cells. (2019-04-11)
Conservationists clash over ways forward despite sharing 'core aims', study finds
Latest research reveals rifts within global conservation movement while confirming support for aims underpinning it. (2019-04-09)
How understanding animal behavior can support wildlife conservation
Researchers from EPFL and the University of Zurich have developed a model that uses data from sensors worn by meerkats to gain a more detailed picture of how animals behave in the wild. (2019-04-03)
Artificial intelligence enables recognizing and assessing a violinist's bow movements
In playing music, gestures are extremely important, in part because they are directly related to the sound and the expressiveness of the musicians. (2019-04-02)
Running upright: The minuscule movements that keep us from falling
Maybe running comes easy, each stride pleasant and light. Maybe it comes hard, each step a slog to the finish. (2019-03-28)
Artificial intelligence identifies key patterns from video footage of infant movements
A simple video recording of an infant lying in bed can be analyzed with artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to extract quantitative information useful for assessing the child's development as well as the efficacy of ongoing therapy. (2019-03-26)
Climate change affecting fish in Ontario lakes, University of Guelph study reveals
Researchers have found warmer average water temperatures in Ontario lakes over the past decade have forced fish to forage in deeper water. (2019-03-22)
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Trevor move into Gulf of Carpentaria
Tropical Cyclone Trevor has crossed Queensland, Australia's Cape York Peninsula and re-emerged into the Gulf of Carpentaria. (2019-03-21)
Underwater surveys in Emerald Bay reveal the nature and activity of Lake Tahoe faults
Emerald Bay, California, a beautiful location on the southwestern shore of Lake Tahoe, is surrounded by rugged landscape, including rocky cliffs and remnants of mountain glaciers. (2019-03-19)
Machine learning tracks moving cells
Scientists can now study the migration of label-free cells at unprecedented resolution, a feat with applications across biology, disease research, and drug development. (2019-03-13)
Thanks to pig remains, scientists uncover extensive human mobility to sites near Stonehenge
A mutli-isotope analysis of pigs remains found around henge complexes near Stonehenge has revealed the large extent and scale of movements of human communities in Britain during the Late Neolithic. (2019-03-13)
One among many
Anyone moving in a large crowd, absorbed in their phone and yet avoiding collisions, follows certain laws that they themselves create. (2019-03-12)
Speedy 'slingshot' cell movement observed for the first time
By slingshotting themselves forward, human cells can travel more than five times faster than previously documented. (2019-03-12)
Parkinson's treatment delivers a power-up to brain cell 'batteries'
Scientists have gained clues into how a Parkinson's disease treatment, called deep brain stimulation, helps tackle symptoms. (2019-03-12)
NYU Abu Dhabi study finds grasping motions lead by visuo-haptic signals are most effective
NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have found that the availability of both visual and haptic information for a target object significantly improves reach-to-grasp actions, demonstrating that the nervous system utilizes both types of information to optimize movement execution. (2019-03-06)
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