Nav: Home

Current Movement News and Events

Current Movement News and Events, Movement News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Researchers of the UMA analyze the role of kinesiophobia in individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain
Finding out how kinesiophobia -- unreasonable fear of movement -- may affect individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain is the aim of a research group of the University of Malaga, which recent studies have been published in the scientific journal British Journal of Sports Medicine, the world's No. (2019-10-15)
How bats relocate in response to tree loss
Identifying how groups of animals select where to live is important for understanding social dynamics and for management and conservation. (2019-10-09)
Creating a single phonon in ambient conditions
EPFL physicists have for the first time successfully observed a single quantum of vibrational energy at ambient conditions, involving the oscillation of more than 100 billion atoms. (2019-10-08)
How can ultrasonic brain stimulation cure brain diseases?
IBS scientists found a calcium channel expressed in astrocytes in the brain to be a highly sensitive target for LILFU-induced neuronal activity in the motor cortex, such as tail movement. (2019-10-08)
Need to balance guides development of limb-body coordination
The need to feel balanced drives the development of coordination between body and limbs as zebrafish larvae learn to swim, a new study finds. (2019-10-08)
Icaros: Flight simulator home trainer
Epidemiological studies show significant correlations between periods spent sitting and the prevalence of chronic diseases. (2019-10-07)
Intriguing discovery provides new insights into photoelectric effect
The discovery that free electrons can move asymmetrically provides a deeper understanding of one of the basic processes in physics: the photoelectric effect. (2019-10-01)
Molecular motors -- Rotation on an eight-shaped path
Chemical engineers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich, Germany, have developed the first molecular motor that enables an eight-shaped movement. (2019-10-01)
Collagen fibers encourage cell streaming through balancing act
Engineers from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University have shown that the length of collagen fibers has a roll to play in the ability of normal cells to become invasive. (2019-10-01)
Step forward in falling research
University of Queensland research shows there is more at play than just a sinking feeling when you stumble during movement or trip in a hole in the ground. (2019-10-01)
Why are there no animals with three legs?
If 'Why?' is the first question in science, 'Why not?' must be a close second. (2019-10-01)
Climate change could pit species against one another as they shift ranges
Species have few good options when it comes to surviving climate change--they can genetically adapt to new conditions, shift their ranges, or both. (2019-09-30)
Tracking Alzheimer's disease pathology in single neuronal cells
University of Warwick researchers have developed a superior method to describe the very earliest effects that Alzheimer's Disease proteins have on the properties of brain cells. (2019-09-26)
T. rex used a stiff skull to eat its prey
A Tyrannosaurus rex could bite hard enough to shatter the bones of its prey. (2019-09-25)
Fractal patterns in growing bacterial colonies
Lautaro Vassallo and his co-workers in Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Argentina have modelled the growth and sliding movement of bacterial colonies using a novel method in which the behaviour of each bacterium is simulated separately. (2019-09-20)
Study finds hub linking movement and motivation in the brain
Detailed observations in the lateral septum indicate that the well-connected region processes movement, and reward information to help direct behavior. (2019-09-19)
Cancer cells prefer a 'comfort cruise,' follow predictable paths of least resistance
New research from a group of Vanderbilt biomedical engineers reveals that while cancer cells move quickly in metastasis, they're rather lazy in which paths they choose -- opting to move through wider, easier to navigate spaces rather than smaller, confined spaces to reduce energy requirements during movement. (2019-09-13)
Cause of congenital nystagmus found
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have overturned the long held view that congenital nystagmus, a condition where eyes make repetitive involuntary movements, is a brain disorder by showing that its cause is actually retinal. (2019-09-12)
Professor's research paints picture of #MeToo movement's origins
San Francisco State University Assistant Professor of Economics Sepideh Modrek studies tweets sent during the first week of the #MeToo movement to understand its magnitude. (2019-09-11)
How emotion affects action
During high stress situations such as making a goal in soccer, some athletes experience a rapid decline in performance under pressure, known as 'choking.' Now, Salk Institute researchers have uncovered what might be behind the phenomenon: one-way signals from the brain's emotion circuit to the movement circuit. (2019-09-10)
Study: Action-oriented goals produce higher probability of purchases under tight deadlines
People on a tight deadline have stronger intentions to enact behaviors -- whether it's redeeming a coupon or following through on receiving a flu shot -- immediately after moving than after sitting, says research co-written by U. of. (2019-09-09)
An oral splint that can reduce Tourette syndrome tics
Osaka University researchers developed a new device that ameliorates the characteristic vocal and motor tics of Tourette syndrome. (2019-09-09)
Racial disparity in Houston's pretrial population
This report examines racial and ethnic disparity among jail bookings and the pretrial population in Harris County so that we are better able to inform and prioritize approaches to pretrial equity. (2019-09-04)
Moving faster in a crowd
Cell particles move more quickly through a crowded cellular environment when the crowding molecules are non-uniformly distributed. (2019-08-30)
UCI scientist identifies cone snail's strike as one of the quickest in the animal kingdom
With the use of ultra-high-speed videography, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Associate Professor Emanuel Azizi and colleagues from Occidental College Los Angeles have shed light on the hunting mechanism of the cone snail Conus catus. (2019-08-30)
New method could help assess a worker's situational awareness while multitasking
With the ever-increasing connectivity of today's society, the demand for a real-time way to evaluate how well an employee understands their current situation -- often called situational awareness -- has become a paramount safety issue for employers, especially those in industrial and manufacturing industries. (2019-08-29)
Who you see matters: Stroke patients benefit more from observing their own hand movements during therapy
Japanese scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have found that for stroke patients, observing their own hand movements in a video-assisted therapy -- as opposed to someone else's hand -- could enhance brain activity and speed up rehabilitation. (2019-08-23)
African elephants demonstrate movements that vary in response to ecological change
Wild African elephants show markedly different movements and reactions to the same risks and resources, according to a new study from Colorado State University and Save the Elephants. (2019-08-20)
National livestock movement bans may prove economically damaging
New research from the University of Warwick has pioneered an economic perspective on controlling livestock diseases. (2019-08-19)
Impulsive behaviour linked to sleep and screen time, CHEO study finds
A paper published today in Pediatrics suggests that children and youth who do not sleep enough and use screens more than recommended are more likely to act impulsively and make poorer decisions. (2019-08-14)
#MeToo media coverage sympathetic to but not necessarily empowering for women
The #MeToo movement has encouraged women to share their personal stories of sexual harassment. (2019-08-14)
Mapping the energetic landscape of solar cells
A new spectroscopic method now makes it possible to measure and visualize the energetic landscape inside solar cells based on organic materials. (2019-08-13)
Estrogen improves Parkinson's disease symptoms
Brain-selective estrogen treatment improves the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in male mice, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2019-08-12)
The formula that makes bacteria float upstream
Bacteria can swim against the current -- and often this is a serious problem, for example when they spread in water pipes or in medical catheters. (2019-08-12)
Biomarker to avoid safety risk for the sleep deprived
New research published today in the The Journal of Physiology shows that a range of eye-movement tests provide a reliable biomarker of individual acute sleep loss. (2019-08-08)
Wearable motion sensors could save unborn babies
Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a technique that could allow expectant parents to hear their baby's heartbeat continuously at home with a non-invasive and safe device that is potentially more accurate than any fetal heartrate monitor currently available in the market. (2019-08-07)
Animal collectives like ants should move through their environment like 'savvy gamblers'
Many animals have to move around in their environment to find resources to live and reproduce. (2019-08-06)
Technique uses magnets, light to control and reconfigure soft robots
Researchers have developed a technique that allows them to remotely control the movement of soft robots, lock them into position for as long as needed and later reconfigure the robots into new shapes. (2019-08-02)
Music was form of resistance for women during Civil Rights Movement
'Freedom songs' were key in giving motivation and comfort to those fighting for equal rights, in addition to helping empower Black women to lead others when formal leadership positions were unavailable. (2019-08-02)
How humans and chimpanzees travel towards a goal in rainforests
How do human-unique ranging styles, like large home range and trail use, influence the way we travel to our goals? (2019-07-30)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...