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Current Multiple sclerosis News and Events

Current Multiple sclerosis News and Events, Multiple sclerosis News Articles.
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Multiple sclerosis as the flip side of immune fitness
About half of the people with multiple sclerosis have the HLA-DR15 gene variant. (2020-10-22)
Tracer molecule may improve imaging tests for brain injury
Researchers have validated a new radiolabeled molecule that can be used with imaging tests to accurately detect and characterize brain injury. (2020-10-22)
Mayo Clinic: diagnostic, therapeutic advance for rare neurodegenerative disorder
Mayo Clinic researchers, along with national and global collaborators, have developed a potential test for Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) ? a disease that has no cure. (2020-10-21)
Anti-inflammatory therapy shows promise in slowing progression of multiple sclerosis
Intranasal administration of an anti-inflammatory drug helped reduce disease progression in a preclinical model of multiple sclerosis, according to recent research out of the University of Alberta. (2020-10-20)
Gut bacteria in multiple sclerosis: Probiotic or commensal, good or bad?
Though evidence suggests that the gut microbiome modulates risk of multiple sclerosis, new findings from the University of Vermont highlight complex interactions between host genetics and environmental factors impact susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. (2020-10-19)
Study identifies key enzyme for development of autoimmune diseases
An enzyme associated with energy production in cells also participates in the differentiation of immune cells involved in exacerbated inflammation. (2020-10-19)
New therapy improves treatment for multiple sclerosis
A new therapy that binds a cytokine to a blood protein shows potential in treating multiple sclerosis, and may even prevent it. (2020-10-12)
Simple sugar possible therapy for repairing myelin in multiple sclerosis
N-acetylglucosamine, a simple sugar found in human breast milk and sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement in the United States, promotes myelin repair in mouse models and correlates with myelination levels in multiple sclerosis patients according to a new University of California, Irvine-led study. (2020-10-07)
A small switch with a big impact
Minor changes in immune cells can significantly affect the immune response, scientists of the University of Würzburg have now discovered. (2020-10-05)
Study defines risk factors for unemployment in working people with multiple sclerosis
'Risk of unemployment is highest during the first three to five years after diagnosis, so we need to be able to intervene early to prevent job losses, and their subsequent impact. (2020-10-05)
Medicine for multiple sclerosis patients inhibits coronavirus - at least in a test tube
A drug which has already been approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis patients effectively inhibits the coronavirus when tested on human lung cells. (2020-10-02)
Remote neuropsychology tests for children shown effective
Administering neuropsychology evaluations to children online in the comfort of their own homes is feasible and delivers results comparable to tests traditionally performed in a clinic, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers and Children's Health indicates. (2020-09-24)
New insights into how the drug pomalidomide fights cancer
Scientists from the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo Medical University, and Saitama Medical University have published findings that offer insights into how the drug pomalidomide benefits some patients with a cancer called multiple myeloma. (2020-09-21)
Regulatory T cells could lead to new immunotherapies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis
In a new University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers have discovered how regulatory T cells (Treg) are instrumental in limiting the damage caused to the spinal cord in diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). (2020-09-21)
Immune system may have another job -- combatting depression
An inflammatory autoimmune response within the central nervous system similar to one linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) has also been found in the spinal fluid of healthy people, according to a new Yale-led study comparing immune system cells in the spinal fluid of MS patients and healthy subjects. (2020-09-18)
World's first major study into MS and pregnancy reveals it delays onset of MS symptoms by more than 3 years
A comprehensive international study, led by Monash researchers, has definitively found that pregnancy can delay the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) by more than 3 years. (2020-09-14)
Glial cells play an active role in the nervous system
Researchers at Münster University, Germany, have discovered that glial cells - one of the main components of the brain -not only control the speed of nerve conduction, but also influence the precision of signal transduction in the brain. (2020-09-08)
Kidney problems as a young adult may affect thinking skills in midlife
If you have moderate-to-high risk of kidney failure as a young adult, you may be at risk for worse cognitive function in middle age, according to a study published in the Sept. (2020-09-02)
COVID-19 impact survey yields unexpected findings for individuals with progressive MS
Dr. Chiaravalloti: 'People with progressive MS appeared to have adapted more effectively to the lockdown conditions. (2020-09-02)
Immune protein IL-17A responsible for lethal side effects of gastric cancer
The formation of scar tissue, or fibrosis, as gastric cancer disseminates throughout the peritoneum can be more lethal than the cancer itself and can interfere with chemotherapy. (2020-08-26)
Tag team gut bacteria worsen symptoms of multiple sclerosis
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) have discovered that a particular combination of microorganisms in the gut can worsen symptoms in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. (2020-08-26)
Researchers pursue 'hidden pathology' to explain fatigue in multiple sclerosis
In a study published in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital used positron emission technology (PET) imaging to look for brain's immune cells that may become erroneously activated in MS, leading to fatigue. (2020-08-26)
Faulty brain circuits arise from abnormal fusion
University of Queensland (UQ) researchers have found that when nematode worms were engineered to express the molecules fusogens in their neurons, these nerve cells fused together, causing behavioural impairments. (2020-08-24)
Is risk of Alzheimer's linked to specific sleep patterns?
Disturbed sleep patterns do not cause Alzheimer's disease but people who are at high genetic risk of developing Alzheimer's disease may be more likely to be a 'morning person,' have shorter sleep duration and other measures of sleep disturbance and are less likely to have insomnia, according to a study published in the August 19, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-08-19)
Cashew shell compound appears to mend damaged nerves
In laboratory experiments, a chemical compound found in the shell of the cashew nut promotes the repair of myelin, a team from Vanderbilt University Medical Center reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-08-17)
Multiple sclerosis drug blocks HIV infection and transmission in human immune cells
An immunomodulatory drug called fingolimod, which is approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, blocks human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and transmission in human immune cells, according to a study published August 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Postdoctoral Fellow Rachel Resop and Assistant Professor Alberto Bosque of The George Washington University, and colleagues. (2020-08-13)
MS drug may be used to inhibit hiv infection and reduce latent reservoir
A multiple sclerosis drug may be used to block HIV infection and reduce the latent reservoir, according to research published in PLOS Pathogens by a team at the RGeorge Washington University. (2020-08-13)
People who feel dizzy when they stand up may have higher risk of dementia
Some people who feel dizzy or lightheaded when they stand up may have an increased risk of developing dementia years later, according to a new study published in the August 12, 2020, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-08-06)
Identification of a new mechanism in the immune system provides knowledge about diseases
A recently identified mechanism in the immune system reveals a previously unknown protein that could provide an opening to a better understanding of infections and autoimmune diseases. (2020-08-04)
Stretches of repeating DNA predispose to systemic sclerosis
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that extended repeats of DNA in the gene FLI1 are associated with systemic sclerosis. (2020-08-03)
Your brain parasite isn't making you sick -- here's why
The new discovery could have important implications for brain infections, neurodegenerative diseases and autoimmune disorders. (2020-07-30)
Stem cell 'therapy' injuries more widespread than we knew
Grotesque side effects from unproven 'stem cell' therapies are more common than we realized, reports a team of researchers led by UConn Health in Annals of Neurology on July 29. (2020-07-29)
A safer cell therapy harnesses patient T cells to fight multiple myeloma
A treatment for multiple myeloma that harnesses the body's cancer-fighting T cells was safe in humans and showed preliminary signs of effectiveness, according to a clinical trial involving 23 patients with relapsed or treatment-resistant disease. (2020-07-29)
Mental fatigue of multiple sclerosis linked to inefficient recruitment of neural resources
Results of the pilot study were consistent with prior research into brain activity in response to mental fatigue, according to Dr. (2020-07-28)
New role for white blood cells in the developing brain
Whether white blood cells can be found in the brain has been controversial, and their role there a complete mystery. (2020-07-22)
Restoring mobility by identifying the neurons that make it possible
Partial mobility can be restored in rodents with impaired spinal cords. (2020-07-20)
Yale researchers discover potential treatment for rare degenerative disease
Yale pharmacology professor Barbara Ehrlich and her team have uncovered a mechanism driving a rare, lethal disease called Wolfram Syndrome and also a potential treatment. (2020-07-16)
Simple blood test may predict concussion severity just as well as spinal tap
A blood biomarker in people who have had concussions may be just as accurate at predicting the severity of the injury and how long it will last as biomarkers that are obtained through more expensive and invasive tests, according to a study published in the July 8, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-07-08)
Study: Fever-associated seizures after vaccination do not affect development, behavior
Now a new study has found there is no difference in developmental and behavioral outcomes for children who have febrile seizures after vaccination, children who have febrile seizures not associated with vaccination and children who have never had a seizure. (2020-07-01)
Does deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's increase risk of dementia?
There's good news for people with Parkinson's disease. A new study shows that deep brain stimulation may not increase the risk of developing dementia. (2020-07-01)
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