Current Music News and Events

Current Music News and Events, Music News Articles.
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Breaking the skill limit, pianists attain more delicate touch
Japanese scientists discovered a training method to further improve the delicate touch of pianists by optimizing the method rather than increase the amount of training. They developed a system that freely controls the weight of piano keys using a haptic device, which enables to control the strength and direction of the force. The results of experiments showed that enhancing the somatosensory function of fingertips with AHT could improve the accuracy of keystrokes. (2020-11-25)

Astrocytes identified as master 'conductors' of the brain
A team of Duke scientists has found that glial astrocytes are involved in regulating inhibitory synapses by binding to neurons through an adhesion molecule called NrCAM. 'We really discovered that the astrocytes are the conductors that orchestrate the notes that make up the music of the brain,' said Scott Soderling, PhD, chair of the Department of Cell Biology in the School of Medicine and senior author on the paper. (2020-11-12)

Minor fluctuations in sound make it hard to identify in which concert hall music is played
The volume and timbre of music have a significant impact on how people perceive the acoustics in a concert hall, according to two recent studies carried out by the research group of Aalto University Professor Tapio Lokki. Both have been published in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, one of the most prestigious journals in its field. (2020-11-05)

Your favorite music can send your brain into a pleasure overload
Electroencephalography (EEG) has been used as a novel technique to show how cortical activity, related to the reward-system, happens in the brain when people experience a musical ''chill''. The new study yields an in-depth view into how organic chills are produced in natural musical settings, and why they might occur. (2020-11-03)

The rhythm of change: What a drum-beat experiment reveals about cultural evolution
Living organisms aren't the only things that evolve over time. Cultural practices change, too, and in recent years social scientists have taken a keen interest in understanding this cultural evolution. A new experiment used drum-beats to investigate the role that environment plays on cultural shifts, confirming that different environments do indeed give rise to different cultural patterns. (2020-10-27)

War songs and lullabies behind origins of music
Love is not the primary reason humans developed music. A new evolutionary theory of the origins of music argues more evidence supports music coming from the need for groups to impress allies and foes, and for parents to signal their attention to infants. They also argue against the theory that making music arose out of a need for social bonding, or that it is ''auditory cheesecake'' a fancy evolutionary byproduct with no purpose. (2020-10-26)

Frère Jacques, are you sleeping?
Researchers at Harvard's Music Lab have determined that American infants relaxed when played lullabies that were unfamiliar and in a foreign language. The new findings supported the latter hypothesis: infants responded to universal elements of songs, despite the unfamiliarity of their melodies and words, and relaxed. The researchers also predict that the results could be replicated with a different group of subjects from another culture. (2020-10-19)

Earphone tracks facial expressions, even with a face mask
Cornell University researchers have invented an earphone that can continuously track full facial expressions by observing the contour of the cheeks - and can then translate expressions into emojis or silent speech commands. (2020-10-12)

Musical training can improve attention and working memory in children - study
Musically trained children perform better at attention and memory recall and have greater activation in brain regions related to attention control and auditory encoding. (2020-10-08)

The proof is in the pudding
As Australia's aged care sector continues to be scrutinised, researchers at the University of South Australia show that plain solutions are often the best, with a new study finding that aged care residents can improve their nutrition intake simply by increasing their meal sizes. (2020-09-30)

Noise can put you off your food
Noise can make or break a dining experience, according to a laboratory study replicating common noise levels in restaurants. The acoustic experts say the study proves that high noise levels can play a major part in a dining experience - along with the quality of the food and restaurant service. (2020-09-29)

Is the "Mozart Effect" real? New analysis indicates that music can help epilepsy
A new comprehensive analysis on the effect of Mozart's music on epilepsy has confirmed that listening to his piano music can reduce the frequency of epilepsy attacks. The results of this comprehensive meta-analysis (a study of studies), which may overturn current scepticism about the effect, are presented at the ECNP congress after recent publication in a peer-reviewed journal (2020-09-11)

Climate change will decimate Palm Springs, Coachella Valley tourism
A new UC Riverside study finds that climate change will have a devastating effect on the greater Palm Springs area's dominant industry -- tourism. Due to climate change, the number of days above 85 degrees between November and April is projected to increase up to 150% by the end of the century. (2020-09-08)

New species of Cretaceous brittle star named in honour of Nightwish vocalist
Palaeontologists have discovered a previously unknown species of brittle star that lived in the shallow, warm sea which covered parts of the present-day Netherlands at the end of the Dinosaur Era. The starfish-like creature was unearthed more than 20 years ago but has only now been identified as new to science. The name of the new fossil pays tribute to Dutch metal vocalist Floor Jansen, in recognition of the mutual inspiration between science and music. (2020-08-24)

What violin synchronization can teach us about better networking in complex times
A new study published in Nature Communications suggests by using a model of violin synchronization in a network of violin players, there are ways to drown out distractions and miscommunications that could be used as a model for human networks in society. (2020-08-11)

Seeing chemical reactions with music
Audible sound enables chemical coloring and the coexistence of different chemical reactions in a solution. (2020-08-10)

Music training may not make children smarter after all
Music training does not have a positive impact on children's cognitive skills, such as memory, and academic achievement, such as maths, reading or writing, according to a study published in Memory & Cognition. (2020-07-28)

Getting a grip on near-field light
Harvard researchers have developed a system to mold near-field light -- opening the door to unprecedented control over this powerful, largely unexplored type of light. (2020-07-23)

Music on the brain
A new study looks at differences between the brains of Japanese classical musicians, Western classical musicians and nonmusicians. Researchers investigated specific kinds of neural behavior in participants as they were exposed to unfamiliar rhythms and nonrhythmic patterns. Trained musicians showed greater powers of rhythmic prediction compared to nonmusicians, with more subtle differences between those trained in Japanese or Western classical music. This research has implications for studies of cultural impact on learning and brain development. (2020-07-20)

Desert island discs: Music listened to in younger years defines us forever, research finds
Researchers at the University of Westminster and City University of London analysing the music record choices of guests on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs programme has found that the music we listen to between the age of 10 and 30 define us for the rest of our lives. (2020-07-09)

Artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark, research
Researchers at McMaster University who study how the brain processes sound have discovered the common practice of using artificial tones in perception experiments could mean scientists are overlooking important and interesting discoveries in the field of brain research. (2020-07-07)

New study detects ringing of the global atmosphere
A ringing bell vibrates simultaneously at a low-pitched fundamental tone and at many higher-pitched overtones, producing a pleasant musical sound. A recent study, just published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences by scientists at Kyoto University and the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, shows that the Earth's entire atmosphere vibrates in an analogous manner, in a striking confirmation of theories developed by physicists over the last two centuries.   (2020-07-07)

Fans love musicians' personalities as much as their music
Why do you like the music you do? You would think that it is because of the music itself. But that's only half the story. Surprisingly, the other half of the story doesn't have much to do with music at all. A new Big Data study from Bar-Ilan University and Columbia Business School found that the musician's personality plays a large role, as well, in listener preferences. (2020-07-02)

Science fiction becomes fact -- Teleportation helps to create live musical performance
A new study by the University of Plymouth explains for the first time how quantum supercomputers could be helpful in the world of making and performing music (2020-07-02)

Study confirms ultra music festival likely stressful to fish
A new study published in the Journal Environmental Pollution by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that the Ultra Music Festival was likely stressful to toadfish. (2020-07-01)

We feel connected when we move together in time with music
Go dancing! A new study conduted at Center for Music in the Brain at Aarhus University, Denmark, suggest that then moving together with music, synchronous movements between individuals increase social closeness. (2020-06-26)

Product recommendation systems can help with search of antiviral drugs
Scientists from Skoltech and the Chumakov Federal Scientific Center for Research and Development of Immune-and-Biological Products of RAS checked the ability of artificial intelligence that suggest products to buy, recommend new antiviral compounds. The researchers found that advanced algorithms can effectively suggest both music, movies to buy, and compounds with antiviral activity. (2020-06-22)

Researchers flush out worrying trend of designer drug use
In a sign that designer drugs are becoming more prevalent in Australia, synthetic cathinones -- commonly known as 'bath salts' -- have been detected in the nation's wastewater in the largest study of its kind in the country. (2020-06-15)

A creative way to expand the geriatrics workforce
In this new study, researchers outlined the results and outcomes of an undergraduate service-learning course that used music and filmmaking to teach person-centered approaches to dementia. (2020-06-11)

Mozart may reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy
A new clinical research study by Dr. Marjan Rafiee and Dr. Taufik Valiante of the Krembil Brain Institute at Toronto Western Hospital, part of University Health Network, has found that a Mozart composition may reduce seizure frequency in patients with epilepsy. (2020-06-10)

Study shows some infants can identify differences in musical tones at six months
New research from neuroscientists at York University suggests the capacity to hear the highs and lows, also known as the major and minor notes in music, may come before you take a single lesson; you may actually be born with it. The study examined the capacity of six-month-old infants to discriminate between a major and a minor musical tone sequence with a unique method that uses eye movements and a visual stimulus. (2020-06-04)

Vision loss influences perception of sound
People with severe vision loss can less accurately judge the distance of nearby sounds, potentially putting them more at risk of injury. (2020-06-03)

Musical rhythm has very deep evolutionary roots and is present in some animals
The musical motives of a song emerge from the temporal arrangement of discrete tones. These tones normally have few durational values, and are organized in structured groups to create metrical patterns. (2020-05-25)

Hearts that drum together beat together
Researchers from Bar-Ilan University found that in a structured group drumming task aspects of participants' heart function synchronized. In a subsequent improvisational drumming task, groups with high physiological synchrony in the structured task showed more coordination in drumming. The data show that behavioral synchronization and enhanced physiological synchronization while drumming each uniquely predicts a heightened experience of group cohesion. Additionally, higher physiological synchrony predicts enhanced group performance in a subsequent, different group task. (2020-05-21)

Every heart dances to a different tune
Play the same piece of music to two people, and their hearts can respond very differently. That's the conclusion of a novel study presented today on EHRA Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2020-05-20)

Music and filmmaking can transform undergraduate student perceptions of dementia
Undergraduate arts and music departments may represent untapped resources for building up the workforce needed to care for older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2020-05-06)

Students who listened to Beethoven during lecture -- and in dreamland -- did better on test
College students who listened to classical music by Beethoven and Chopin during a computer-interactive lecture on microeconomics -- and heard the music played again that night -- did better on a test the next day than did peers who heard the same lecture, but instead slept that evening with white noise in the background. (2020-04-07)

Seductive details inhibit learning
Information that is interesting but irrelevant, or 'seductive details', can be detrimental to learning, according to a meta-analysis of 58 studies by Washington State University researchers. The analysis found that those who learned with seductive details performed lower on learning outcome measures than those who learned without the extraneous information. (2020-03-19)

Music as medicine? 30 minutes a day shows benefits after heart attack
Listening to music can be enjoyable, but is it also good for your heart? Patients who suffered episodes of chest pain soon after a heart attack, known as early post-infarction angina, had significantly lower levels of anxiety and pain if they listened to music for 30 minutes a day, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC). (2020-03-18)

Composing new proteins with artificial intelligence
Scientists have long studied how to improve proteins or design new ones. Traditionally, new proteins are created by mimicking existing proteins or manually editing their amino acids. This process is time-consuming, and it is difficult to predict the impact of changing an amino acid. In APL Bioengineering, researchers explore how to create new proteins by using machine learning to translate protein structures into musical scores, presenting an unusual way to translate physics concepts across domains. (2020-03-17)

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